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Skrama:

Discussion in 'Knife Reviews & Testing' started by GREENJACKET, Apr 20, 2016.

  1. dogrunner

    dogrunner Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 26, 2003
  2. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    Got some more pics of the rounded tip of the puukko 110 in close-up. You can also clearly see the beveled spine (done by the manufacturer for effective scraping and use of a firesteel, as the outer steel is softer than the inner body, which of course also forms the edge). On the edge you can also see the secondary bevel. The rounded-off 'mini sheep's foot' remains functional as a cutting tip, just not for stabbing things or persons. On a far larger scale of course, this is also true of the Skrama bush tool. Note that the Skrama and the puukko are equally thick (4 mm) and made of the same 80CrV2 tool steel that I have seen described by one custom knife maker as 'ridiculously tough'. I don't think this thing is likely to ever break. :)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Humb baby

    Humb baby

    127
    Mar 29, 2017
    8E5CA642-6936-47D0-BDC3-CBF363509765.jpeg
     
    Lyubomir Trayanov and JasonJ like this.
  4. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    Right, back to the Skrama. :) Talk about a sheep's foot...
     
  5. Drakul Mihawk

    Drakul Mihawk

    26
    Jan 4, 2014
    Love my Skrama.... I actually think it's better than a lot of more heavier knife. I tested the skrama vs the tops El chete, they actually have a similar blade shape, the skrama win in chopping, has a more confourtable handle and a better steel in my opinion. It was very fun to try both in a challenge.

     
    jdk1 and JasonJ like this.
  6. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    Energy equals mass multiplied by speed squared, so a knife that is half the weight of its competitor but can move twice as fast will pack twice the punch. More realistically, if the Skrama is 2/3 the weight of the El Chete but can be swung at 50% more speed with some experience and a bit of a wrist flick... All other things being equal (which they obviously aren't) it still hits at more than 1.3 times the energy of the heavier knife. Add better steel (80CrV2 is ridiculously tough), a more comfortable handle and a grind that is keen but, along with a secondary bevel meant for chopping, will break chips out more effectively from the log, and it's no surprise that it leaves the El Chete in the dust.

    Note that the Skrama is a tool aimed at Finnish conscript/reservist soldiers who train to fight a guerilla war in the forests against invading Russians. These guys want something effective that is worth carrying along as a group tool.
     
    Drakul Mihawk likes this.
  7. Drakul Mihawk

    Drakul Mihawk

    26
    Jan 4, 2014
    I thought the exact same things by reasoning about the formula of kinetic energy and forces. The speed is squared in the formula, so it is very important, more that the mass. In addition, an exaggerated mass makes me get tired very quickly.
     
  8. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    I think the Sami people have honed the combination of a short puukko and a long leuku knife to perfection, using the short blade for allround knife tasks and carving, and the leuku for light chopping, brush clearing, splitting kindling (not firewood, they use axes and saws for the big jobs) and as weapons. The skrama is one step up from there but the leuku principle of having a fairly long but relatively light and fast blade for chopping is still present. I have an old leuku here that is 7 inches long (175 mm), 3 mm thick, weighs less than 300 grams and it is still my preferred blade for chopping away bramble vines that invade trails and try to poke your eyes out. Flick, gone.
    The skrama is still more of a northern machete than a hatchet, although it can play that role pretty well in a pinch.
    Generally, the idea of getting the lightest tool that can effectively do what you need appeals to the long-gone backpacker in me...
     
    Boggs likes this.
  9. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    On another note, on the small end of the Terava/Varusteleka scale of cutting implements, I just received their Mini Puukko Bare Tang in the mail. With the flat leather sheath they just started selling for those. Nice... You can hardly get anything more utilitarian than that. Just one piece of 3 mm thick 80CrV2 steel with a somewhat skeletonized full tang that acts as the handle. Oh boy. Turn it into a project to practice handle making, or use it as a backup blade, or, well... Possibilities... B-)
     
  10. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    First quick impression of the Terävä mini puukko: it works. You can actually use this thing as a utility knife without first needing to put a DIY handle on it. Baton it through 30-40 mm thick sticks, make notches, feathersticks, whittle points on sticks, cut cardboard boxes to pieces, slice bread and cheese; it does it all. One would expect that from such a blade. The micro bevel is supposed to be 23 degrees inclusive, I measured the main grind at about 14 degrees inclusive - this is a very high 'scandi' grind going more than halfway up the 3 mm thick blade, making it almost exactly twice as keen as the 29 degrees pure scandi grind on a Mora HD (which is just as thick). Guess which is the better slicer. It cuts like a light saber. The only thing it is not brilliant at is striking a firesteel - it can scrape allright, the spine removes bark for instance, but for some reason it only strikes measly sparks (from my dinky little cheap firesteel; not the best example but it does not do as well as another knife I tested with that firesteel). Maybe the bevel on the spine should have been a tad deeper into the hard inner steel, or it may benefit from a little file job. To me it's not a deal breaker.
    I removed the black forge residue, I have done that with all my Terava puukkos (not the Skrama). It is burnt-in oil from the quenching during the heat treatment, and it tends to stick to certain foods you want tu cut (like cheese). In this case it also stuck to my hands as the whole tange/handle is covered in it. A kitchen sponge, fine-grit sandpaper and 1000-grit steel wool get rid of almost all of it. I guess that wit a lot of effort I could give the whole thing a mirror polish, but it is not that kind of tool. Anyway, mine is now clear metal.
    Many will consider this mini a blade blank for a DIY handle project, and they won't need to buy the flat wraparound sheath from Varusteleka - it will not fit any handled blade, it just holds the naked piece of steel. Put a homemade handle on it, plus a homemade sheath and you have your custom short puukko. Nice, I guess, but there are millions of those. Leave it as it is and get the flat leather sheath with it, and you have a backup knife that fits in most cargo trouser pockets, a corner of a pouch, handbag, computer bag, day pack or whatever. It will allow you to do whatever you would normally do with a sturdy folder, plus things like splitting sticks and other jobs that require more force than you might want to subject a folding mechanism to. You can rinse off muck without bothering about ruining a nice handle or about dirt getting into a folding mechanism.
    I actually like the idea of having such a very basic piece of bare sharp steel 'just in case'.
    Of course there is also a Mini Skrama, the same thing but with the Skrama-style sheep's foot shape. Out of stock when I looked, which is why I went with the mini puukko. They will be back, certainly. I recommend getting the sheath as well for anyone buying a mini - they are OK, good leather, simple, but with a sturdy welt protecting the blade and strong stitching. Even while reflecting on which noble wood you are going to use for a DIY handle you will have a functional knife that will slip unobtrusively into a pocket. And if you manage to attach that flat sheath to the Skrama one, you'll have a little companion for your big blade. :)
     
  11. GREENJACKET

    GREENJACKET

    Feb 23, 2000
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
  12. Patrice

    Patrice Basic Member Basic Member

    20
    Jun 22, 2018
    Just thought I’d chuck in a couple of pics and thoughts on my Skrama. This thread made me aware of them in the first place and I bought it pretty soon after.

    Pic of my Skrama and Junglas 2:
    [​IMG]

    The Skrama is amazing and better than the Junglas 2 for everything I’ve used it for. At 1/3 of the price too! The Junglas 2 would obviously be a better stabber but, for me, that’s not a factor in this type of knife.

    I ordered the Skrama on a Tuesday afternoon and it arrived on Thursday afternoon (Finland-England) so I can’t fault the delivery whatsoever. I already owned the Junglas 2 but had I not, I wouldn’t have needed to buy it (the sheath is great though tbf). My fiancée has somewhat taken ownership anyways so it still gets use.

    They have a similar blade length ( skrama is ~1” longer), and the Skrama is actually lighter(by 35g/ 1 1/4 oz). The main advantage of the Skrama is that if you grip right back on the handle, the tip is actually around 12” from the front of my hand, making it feel like a much more substantial knife, and a huge difference when chopping. When taking into account the straighter sheepsfoot blade it effectively gives about 4” of useable blade beyond the belly of the Junglas 2.

    I opted for the cheaper plastic sleeve, which is safe and sufficient for my use. The sleeve holds tightly, yet releases easily enough, if that makes sense.

    Pic below illustrates comparative blade/handle lengths:
    upload_2018-9-19_12-57-31.jpeg

    Don’t want to ramble or go over things that have been covered previously but I really love everything about this cleverly designed knife. Knives in general are expensive in the UK but the Skrama cost me roughly £80 inc delivery and I honestly don’t think it could be beaten for value in its class.
     
    Dangerously likes this.
  13. Dangerously

    Dangerously

    Jan 8, 2013
    I have skrama fever. In the knife hobby, it’s pretty darned near the impulse purchase range. If they had a stack of them at the checkout of the grocery store I’d already have three.

    The only question: is the leather sheath required? I can’t imagine belt carrying this beast.
     
    GlockMonster30 likes this.
  14. Patrice

    Patrice Basic Member Basic Member

    20
    Jun 22, 2018
    I only have the plastic sheath (shown in pic above) and I’d say it’s perfectly adequate for carrying in a pack etc. Obviously depends on your use and preference but I definitely wouldn’t say it’s necessary.

    The Skrama is a beast and I too was suffering from a debilitating case of Skrama fever :). I reckon there’s only one cure ;)
     
    Dangerously likes this.
  15. BBuser

    BBuser

    215
    Sep 4, 2016
    The leather sheath isn't necessary because it's a bit big to dangle. But it's a nice sheath and provides secure storage.
     
    Dangerously likes this.
  16. schwep

    schwep

    81
    Jan 4, 2017
    Pruned some large tree branches today and needed to delimb them. The Skrama shines at that job. It just flies through finger-thick limbs almost as if they weren't there. :)
     
  17. StrangeDaze

    StrangeDaze Gold Member Gold Member

    821
    Mar 20, 2016
    Its a good sheath imo, especially for the price.
     
    Dangerously likes this.
  18. aleforme

    aleforme Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 21, 2013
    Just for some good old chopping action. The Skrama is a beast of a knife.

     
  19. Dangerously

    Dangerously

    Jan 8, 2013
    You sent them to him! Good on you.

    I received my skrama already. It’s marvelous to grip and pretend swing it around like I’m an Anglo Saxon warrior from five hundred years ago. I don’t know if it cuts anything yet, though. Have to go down a local trail and prune all the branches.
     

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