Small Collection of WWI Folders

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The basic army-issue clasp knife with marline spike and tin opener in the first part of the 1900s was the pattern 6353/1905. It first appeared in 1905 and remained basically the same until the start of WWII. The original spec comprised of stag scales. The first knife in pic 1 is an example made by Hunter Sheffield and marked with the Broad Arrow and I for use by troops in India. It appears to have seen alot of use over the years. It made stops in Alaska and Texas before finally making its way home.

Just before WWI, in 1913, the specs were updated. The scales were changed from stag to chequered horn. The three attachments to be made of the best 'cast steel'. The overall length closed is 4 7/8 inches with the spear blade 3 1/2 inches from kick to point. The shackle made from number 11 guage copper wire. These were the basic GI folder in WWI. Two typical examples seen in pic 1 made by Frank Mills and Jos Rodgers & Sons. Both marked with W arrow D; the War Department mark.

WW1002.jpg

Rodgers2.jpg


Next are three examples of circa WW1 knives for use by Canadian Forces. The first is the typical British 6353 knife made by Wostenholm, but marked on the spike with the Canadian broad arrow inside a C. The middle knife is the same basic spec made by Thomas Turner & Co but with metal scales. The handle is marked with M & D for Militia and Defense 1915. The last knife in the photo was made for the Canadian forces by Schatt & Morgan of Titusville PA. Beautiful bone scales on the this one and a nail nick on the can opener is different from the Sheffield-made knives.

WW1003.jpg

Schatt029.jpg


While not an official issue knife, the jack knives with tin opener and bone scales were included in gift boxes sent to the troops during WWI. This example was made by Wade and Butcher.

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This British Navy knife was known as the Admiralty Pattern 301. It first appeared in 1910 and saw service in WWI. It is 4 1/2 inches long with a 'Best cast-steel hand-forged sheep foot blade' This example was made by Joseph Allen and Sons.

015-12-07005.jpg



WWII collection for a future thread. Please feel free to add knives and comments. Thanks for looking. :D s-k
 
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absolutely beautiful, love them...
All looked like they saw alot of action in their day.:thumbup:
Love the old bone handles:D
thanks
ivan
 

waynorth

Dealer / Materials Provider
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Nice collection, s-k! Thanks for showing them, and for adding the information about them. I have seen a few of these knives at shows, and never had enough information to make them interesting to me, but now I'll take a second look.
I have one that seems to fall into the last category. It is marked Harrison Brothers and Howson, and its manufacturing location is not marked; probably Sheffield.
At 4 3/4" long, would you say it still falls into the Admiralty pattern?
BigRig.jpg
 

Bastid

Goat herding fool and resident vermin breeder.
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Great knives SK and WN.

I love seeing them, would love them even more if I could listen to what they went through!
 
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Thanks everyone for your positve comments. Yes waynorth that appears to be an Admiralty 301 pattern made in Sheffield. My knife is a little longer than 4.5 inches. There was probably some slight variation from maker to maker. Knice stag on your knife. Thanks for adding it here.

added; just looked in Flook's British and Commonwealth Military Knives book and there is a photo of a Harrison Bros & Howson 301 described as having original spec stag handles, a 3.5 inch sheeps foot blade and an overall length of 8.125 inches. Looks like your knife waynorth.
 
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Blues

hovering overhead
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Great knives, S-K and great history.

(When you get further along in the decades I'll try picking your (and Charlie's) brains on that "Amsterdam" mark military knife I have from WWII or thereabouts and had previously posted in BRL's forum without any success at gleaning further info.)
 
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You just keep surprising us(maybe just me ;-)).
Nice collection to be sure, and some good info as well.
two:thumbup:s up

Peter
(cant wait for the WW2 one ;-))
 
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Thank-you Blues and Stockman. I appreciate your comments. WWII perhaps on the weekend. Need to take photos.
 

Will Power

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Another first rate history/culture lesson thank you!

Really astounded that Stag scales might have been on some service knives for use by Tommies and other soldiers, but then, I suppose stag was not as scarce as it is today,but must have been the most prized knife nevertheless.

Be very interesting to see what sort of service knives the Germans and other nations were issued with as well.
 
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Hi,

Absolutely beautiful! Thank You so much for sharing them. I too would love to hear them talk!

dalee
 

knowtracks

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Very cool s-k! I bet you looked for awhile for those beauties. Some very good history there. I too wish they could tell a tale or two.
Thanks for sharing.

Dave
 
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