Some Knife Test Photos

Discussion in 'Fletcher Knives' started by B Griffin, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    My partner Andrew had been wanting to play with the X for a while. Know the different materials available on his land, I thought it sounded like fun. So Sunday afternoon, in a drizzling rain, I let him check it out versus bamboo, wood, and some very dense rubber that is half an inch thick. The rain and dark skies made action shots a challenge, but I managed a few decent photos of the knife in use. And apparently now I am supposed to supply him with one of these too...

    Not a lot of text to read this time, I thought I would just share some of the photos.

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  2. Fletcher Knives

    Fletcher Knives STEEL BREATHING BLADE MAESTRO Moderator

    Aug 30, 2007
    This is one of the greatest threads EVARRRR!
     
  3. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thanks Dylan! I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the testing :)
     
  4. Comprehensivist

    Comprehensivist Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Aug 23, 2008
    Great thread Brian! You have the gift for capturing photos that show knives performing the way the makers intended. I love the motion shots. That is a big bad-ass knife that performs as good as it looks.

    Thanks for posting this series of photos. Awesome blade and performance!

    Phil
     
  5. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thank you Phil! Dylan and I go back a ways. We both joined BF the same year, we talked quite a bit through the forums and then met at Blade the first year he was offering his knives for sale. I got the honor of getting to put one of his earliest knives through hell for a while, and was really impressed with his work as a whole. His ergonomics were awesome, his grinds were fantastic, and his heat treat was spot on. We have had a lot of discussions on knife use and functionality over the years and we have a lot of similar thoughts on the matter. This knife came about from a discussion on the tools we would want in an apocalyptic environment. I have and use axes, and though I do like using hawks some, I am really not a big axe fan. I really prefer a large knife. machetes tend to run a little thin for my tastes in most cases, and then in large knives most production knives seem to either be too thick and have too much mass for my tastes, or they are thinner but not tough enough to handle the hard work that I wanted one to handle. Dylan has a great talent for blending his blade geometry together for the right combination of balance, cutting performance, lateral strength, and overall durability. He knows where to remove unnecessary mass without sacrificing strength. When I described the knife I wanted, I thought about what environmental elements I might encounter in such a world. I wanted it to perform in a variety of cutting tasks, in a variety of environments from temperate forest, to the swamps in the deep south.

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    So I drew out a knife with a 10 inch blade to give me reach, but still be small enough to tuck away in a pack for discretion if needs be. I wanted the elements I liked most about the Bowie, Kukri, and Barong blended together without the elements I didn't like about each. I wanted a slight re-curve for the mechanical advantage of enhance cutting ability in a fatigued physical state, an oval cross section to the handle for good blade control in finer work, and Dylan's awesome contours for both the secure purchase and hand comfort in long term use. I wanted a forward weight distribution for good inertia development with enough mass in the front half of the blade to bite well in chopping, combined with a point sharp enough to penetrate tough hides. I wanted it to function well as a tool in an organic environment, to make other tools with, shelters, fire prep, and general camp work. I also had to take into consideration how I would want it to perform well in an defensive / offensive role as well. These conversations between Dylan and I always flow very smoothly. He has a lot of knowledge in that head of his, and it is really easy for us to get on the same page blade wise. So he took it from there. He refined the drawing and put it to steel in his usual stellar fashion. Though we needed to tweak the handle just a bit for the final version, he essentially nailed it right out of he gate and produced exactly what I needed and wanted.

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    Last edited: Feb 24, 2016
  6. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Wow Brian. Great write up and I especially liked your response to Comprehensivist as you explain the history and purpose. Did you do the drawing or is that something Dylan Fletcher did based on your ideas? That is an excellent drawing. No CAD stuff.... just an old fashion pencil drawing.

    I do think it is an excellent substitute for a hatchet or small axe.

    Anyway, I enjoyed this write up and the pictures. That is one heck of a blade. It pretty much is a high end short machete (but more) with the 15" overall length.

    The photos overall are fantastic. I guess you shot that with an DSLR as a video and then grab the individual images. Very cool.

    I haven't cut enough bamboo to really get a sense if the knife cuts normal trees such as we have here in East TN and the Southeast. But the shots with the oak tree (I believe) demonstrate the chopping ability.

    How was the edge (sharpness) after testing?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2016
  7. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thanks man. I did the original drawing, more of a rough sketch, of the overall shape and elements I wanted in the knife. Then Dylan refined it to the working drawing to suit his style of knife making.

    I think so too, and while I wanted a weight forward design and some reach, here in the south a hatchet can be very limited in functionality for me. A longer blade serves me better in more uses.

    Thank you, actually those were all still shots taken on a rainy day with crappy lighting. Andrew and I plan to get together again on a day with better light :)

    Bamboo is a good test material here in my opinion. It can be very hard in the colder months.

    So far the edge is doing very well, I haven't sharpened it yet, but I probably will before I attack the bamboo again :)
     
  8. Eric@DLT

    [email protected]

    548
    Mar 30, 2015
    Great write up and great pictures! That looks like one heck of a blade.
     
  9. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thank you Eric! I think it turned out very well.
     
  10. Kirkwood

    Kirkwood Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Dec 29, 2012
    Brian, great shots as always. Always love your threads.

    So Dylan... how bout a run of Griffin Xs?
     
  11. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thank you Kris, I'm glad you enjoy the posts :)

    It's not a one-off, he is doing more of them :D
     
  12. Torch76

    Torch76

    211
    Nov 1, 2015
    Awesome dude. Just awesome all around. Super cool thread. Love the pics.
     
  13. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thanks man, glad you liked them! :)
     
  14. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    I'm going back to Andrew's this weekend, to work on a project. Apparently he wan'ts to play with the X more when it isn't raining and muddy. He was very complimentary of your work earlier today :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016
  15. inlikeflynt56

    inlikeflynt56 Gold Member Gold Member

    214
    Apr 16, 2013
    I'd be willing to bet that Dylan had a big grin on his face crafting this one Brian!
    Great writeup and pics as usual.
     
  16. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    I've had the opportunity to watch Dylan grind blades a few times and you are probably right there. Ethan saw it on a trip I made to his house a couple of months ago, and then played with it more this last gathering, smiling the whole time. Apparently it is one of my designs that he gives his 110% approval to :) I love what happens when Dylan takes one of my sketches and the subsequent discussion, and then brings the design to life. I can't wait for the next one, I will actually be able to carry in regularly, and in public even :D
     
  17. Bmurray

    Bmurray Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 9, 2012
    Very cool Brian
     
  18. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Thanks Bob :)
     
  19. trestle

    trestle

    Feb 2, 2008
    You should call it the budget buster 'cause I can't afford one right now. :D

    Awesome design, even better execution. Dylan seems like one of those mercurial artisan types. Without the patchouli.
     
  20. B Griffin

    B Griffin Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 22, 2007
    Lol, with him pricing them at $350, the last I heard anyway, he is already trying to make them as affordable as he can for a handmade knife of this size and one of his awesome sheaths.

    Dylan is awesome. He is as much fun to work with as he is to talk to. He has an uncanny ability to translate data and design functionality into blade profile and geometry very smoothly. He is one of a handful of knife makers I know who grasps so much of the overall function of blades from small ones to large ones. He is one of a few I know who is so anal about the quality of the work he produces. Then he is one of even fewer whose tools I will trust with my life in the middle of nowhere. I've hung out with him a few times, and watched him get into his work. It would take a lot of patchouli to mask the scent of all the steel and handle material dust :D
     

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