SPEAKING OF SMITH & WESSON

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Jan 28, 2001
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I know that Taylor Cutlery has bought the "rights" to use the Smith & Wesson name, however, they seem to use a sales tactic that's becoming popular with some other knife companies. First off, let me say that Taylor Cutlery should be ashamed for marketing knives that say "MADE IN USA" on the box, when in reality, they're made in ROC. I think that was truly a cheap maketing gimmick just to make sales. But what I really want to point out is that some knife companies contract with overseas makers and just throw their company logo on the knives.
Joy Enterprises did this on knives made overseas. One day you would see a knife with a Fury stamp on it and the next you would see the same knife with a Master stamp on it.
Taylor Cutlery marketed small "California legal" automatics and now I see the same knife with a DeltaZ stamp on it. Also, Kellam has some knives out that look and feel just like some DeltaZ'folders. If these knife companies contract their knives overseas, why can't the be original designs?
 

Gollnick

Musical Director
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">If these knife companies contract their knives overseas, why can't the be original designs?</font>

They have that option. But, to do so they would have to pay for tooling and there will be delays. A cheaper and faster way to get knives to sell is just to accept a model that the manufacturer already has tooled up and in production. Maybe you can tweak the design a bit, a unique insert material, a special logo inked or lasered onto the blade, and, of couse, your logo. But it's gonna be basically the same knife.

Delta Z does some original stuff. At least they're upfront about what they do. They tell you right upfront: "we import these." And that's what Delta Z is known for.

When a company has spend generations building a repuation and a brand name that stands for quality, they need to realize that that name and that reputation is the most valuable thing they own. Licensing it out is ok, but must be done very carefully to be sure that every last item that bears their name or logo reflects the quality that their name stands for.

I have a tee shirt with the H&K logo on it, for example. When I bought it, I taked to the seller since I was concerned about buying a pirated thing. His sign said, "All logos are officailly licensed", but I was concerned. I don't want to support any such activities. He assured me that he is licensed by H&K to use the logo and had a copy of the license letter right there with him. I asked him why the H&K shirt was more expensive than the other logos he had. I joked that apparently H&K charges for their name like they do for their guns. He laughed and said that H&K charges him about the same fee as the others but that H&K insists that he put the H&K name on only very high quality shirts. He pointed out that if I liked one specific style of shirt but wanted a different logo on it, he could make that up for me and send it out right away... but, not the H&K logo. That could only go on a limited few styles of shirts that H&K had approved. And as I compared them, yes, the H&K shirts were heavier and better made.

H&K wisely realizes that any time their logo appears on something, the customer's opinion of H&K and all of their products might be formed by the experience with that thing.


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Chuck
Balisongs -- because it don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing!
http://www.balisongcollector.com
 
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I have seen the lame Walther knives being produced by Gutmann. I guess it's up to the knife buyer to be mindful about the knife they buy when the company name is licensed.
 
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Great point Chuck, it's the same with Glock, and I've got a couple of Glock T's that still look great even though they're five years old.
(quote from Gollnick)
When a company has spend generations building a repuation and a brand name that stands for quality, they need to realize that that name and that reputation is the most valuable thing they own. Licensing it out is ok, but must be done very carefully to be sure that every last item that bears their name or logo reflects the quality that their name stands for.
That's the whole problem
S&W is no longer owned by the people who built that reputation. It's owned by foriegn investors looking for the quick buck, and if the investment doesn't pan out, they'll dump it like yesterday's fish. They could care less.
That's why it was so easy for them to roll over for the infamous "S&W Decision" too.




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Tráceme no sin la razón, envoltura mi no sin honor
Usual Suspect
 

Burke

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Feb 25, 1999
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Actually, Chuck, your point about companies being careful what they put their name on isn't really true of any gun company when it comes to knives. I've heard that the HK folder (looks like an Emerson) out there is a piece of crap, and I know that both the Smith & Wesson and Colt folders are pretty lousy. It's too bad these companies that are mostly known for making high-quality guns can't get it together and produce decent knives.
 
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The only HK folder I've seen is made for them by Boker. It has a plastic or should I say "polymer" handle and a spear point or tanto point blade. In it's construction, I would say it's comparable to the Boker Gemini series.

[This message has been edited by el cid (edited 02-21-2001).]
 
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Does anyone Remember when S&W did make their own knives back in the 70s Those were nice knives but rather pricey for the time.

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JimBob
 
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