Spyderco Native on Airplanes

Discussion in 'Spyderco Forum Archive' started by JDS, Mar 5, 2000.

  1. JDS

    JDS

    187
    Jan 31, 2000
    I love my new Spyderco Native and would like to take it on an upcoming trip. I'll have only carry-on luggage and was wondering if anyone has had problems with the Native at security checkpoints. I know the FAA says under 4 in. is ok, but the false edge makes the knife look a little more aggressive. Just in case I'll carry an envelope to mail it home. Any good or bad experiences?

    Thanks
     
  2. aflatfoot

    aflatfoot

    245
    Jun 19, 1999
    I WOULD SUGGEST GETTING INFORMATION FROM THE AIRPORTS YOU PLAN ON TRAVELLING THROUGH. THE FAA DOES HAVE GUIDELINES BUT I AM FUZZY ON THEM. I DO KNOW THAT WHEN I FLEW THROUGH MEMPHIS THEY HAVE POSTED NO KNIVES, GUNS, OR OTHER WEAPONS. BUT I CARRIED A PLAIN EDGE NAVIGATOR AND HAD NO PROBLEM. I WOULD HIGHLY SUGGEST CHECKING AND AVOID ANY HASSLES.

    ------------------
    EXCUSE ME WHILE I WHIP THIS OUT.
    **Blazing Saddles**
     
  3. sing

    sing

    Jan 31, 1999
    JDS,

    I have traveled with my BF Native quite a few times and never had a problem. Caveate -- that is no trouble with the straight edge. Serrations seem to strike irrational fear. Maybe they think you can cut open the fusalage like a can. Dunno.

    YMMV because the airport security people seem to react different ways. I have dumped the knife on the counter and walked through the detector with no problem. I had one guy measure the blade length against his security ID. Another called his supervisor. She said, "No serrations, no problem." [shrug] I always bring a self addressed envelop just in case.

    sing

    AKTI #A000356
     
  4. RH

    RH

    Jan 31, 1999
    aflatfoot, just a little internet FYI, when someone posts in all CAPS, it sends the message to others that you are SHOUTING. It is also hard on the eyes for readers. I know the tone of your postings is not one of shouting, but it might be taken thusly.
     
  5. aflatfoot

    aflatfoot

    245
    Jun 19, 1999
    I think it is irresponsible of the FAA not to clearly define a policy concerning knives and air travel. As our society becomes more fearful of domestic terrorism, one might unwittingly face serious consequences due to an over zealous airport authority.

    ------------------
    EXCUSE ME WHILE I WHIP THIS OUT.
    **Blazing Saddles**

    [This message has been edited by aflatfoot (edited 03-07-2000).]

    [This message has been edited by aflatfoot (edited 03-08-2000).]
     
  6. Ron L

    Ron L Basic Member Basic Member

    608
    Mar 23, 1999
    I flew out of Detroit Metro to Philadelphia last week and the security guard looked at my Calypso Junior like it was the plague. I tried to use it as a money clip and not make a big deal about it. He held the basket at arm's length and asked ME to open it so that he could check it out. Then they made a big deal about the SOG tool I had in my daytimer. Like I was going to hijack the plane by dismantling it piece by piece. What a trip. Needless to say, I had both in my carry-on on the trip home and had no problems whatsoever.
     
  7. Brian_T

    Brian_T

    Oct 7, 1999
    JDS,

    My job requires extensive travel and I've never had a problem with my part-serrated Native.

    I actually had a Dragonfly confiscated in O'Hare but the security guard didn't even bat an eye at the Native.

    If you are concerned, put the knife in your carry-on and take it out once through the checkpoint. I doubt anything bad would happen to you during the few moments when you didn't have access to your Native.

    Great knife though. I never leave home without mine.

    Brian_T
    [email protected]
     
  8. Mochiman1

    Mochiman1

    449
    Aug 23, 1999
    I too travel quite a bit and have never encountered any problems with my plain edge Native or for that matter with any serrated knife. But I never have to take my knife off my person and put it in the basket. It's already in my shaving kit inside my carry-on bag. Why risk a scene?
     
  9. Mochiman1

    Mochiman1

    449
    Aug 23, 1999
    P.S.--somebody enlighten me. What is meant by a troll or trolling? I see this from time to time and I can tell the implication is pretty negative, but I haven't a clue as to where it comes from. Fishing? Norse myths about critters under the bridge?
     
  10. RH

    RH

    Jan 31, 1999
    aflatfoot,
    I've seen similiar etiquette faux pas handled similiarly (politely, with no condescension or insult intended) in this and other forums. If you are that sensitive re: public correction, perhaps you shouldn't be posting on a world-wide public forum. Troll ? Undeserving of a response. Let's just drop it.
     
  11. aflatfoot

    aflatfoot

    245
    Jun 19, 1999
    good idea

     
  12. leroys_45

    leroys_45

    626
    Oct 26, 1999
    I'll share my native traveling experiences here. I flew to Montana and back last year with a part serrated native, no problem. I flew out to college this year with it as well, once again no problem. I flew home at Christmas break with a plain micarta calypso jr, and tried to fly back to college after break with a plain edge BF native. Sorry if I offend anyone here, it's not my intent. The "rent-a-cop" at the security post could barely speak english so I may not be representing him exactly as it was. I unclipped it and put it in the basket. He opened it up and said I couldn't take it through. I informed him that under 4" was the law and that it was clearly under that limit. He agreed, so I asked why it couldn't go. From what I could understand, he said, "It's because of the sharpness" while pointing to the grind lines. He knew almost nothing about knives as he couldn't close it and he never felt the edge for real sharpness. If he had, it would have scared the crap out of him. I had to leave shortly, so I didn't argue anymore and just checked it with my other baggage. No one ever noticed or said a work about the baby wayne goddard on my keychain though. For most times, where the security personel are halfway qualified, you should be fine. But you might get unlucky and find an idiot as I did. Just my 2 cents.
     
  13. RH

    RH

    Jan 31, 1999
    Last year I travelled between Newark and LAX twice with a Multi-Tool and Delica inside my carry on - a knapsack. No questions asked. If carry on is all you have, I would recommend stowing it there for the scanners, and keeping what you have at 3" or so, plain edge. Or buy a knockoff cheapie to stow in the bag, so you won't lose much if it's taken. Recently picking up a friend at JFK, I had to leave my knife in the car when I ran in for the Mens room - the detectors were at the terminal door, for all to pass thru, even non-passengers. Brave new world.
     
  14. JDS

    JDS

    187
    Jan 31, 2000
    Thanks for all of the input. I'll stick it in my carry-on and see what happens. Happy travels.
     
  15. Will.223

    Will.223

    459
    Mar 1, 2000
    I'm always a little shocked when I hear of a a small knife being confiscated at an airport. Brian_T, was the Dragonfly ever given back to you at some point? I have heard that someone got their Cricket taken away at Newark. It is just unbelievable that someone would be concerned with a Cricket! Then again, I'm from the south and having a pocket knife is kind of a tradition. Still, it's really offensive when someone say's, "give me the knife".

    Will

    ------------------
    Mendacity is the
    system we live in.
     
  16. Brian_T

    Brian_T

    Oct 7, 1999
    Will,

    Nope. I never saw it again. [​IMG]

    Ah well, live and learn.

    Brian_T
    [email protected]
     
  17. tim_marsh

    tim_marsh

    41
    Dec 2, 1999
    I recently flew from Melbourne to Sydney (in Australia, of course), with my standard daily combo of Calypso Jr clipped in my pocket and an SAK Traveller in a small belt sheath. I put them both in the change tray, and walked through the detector arch. The woman on the detector saw the sheath and said 'excuse me, sir, but do you have a leatherman or a pocket knife in that'. I explained that I'd put it through the x-ray machine. She smiled and said 'No worries then'.

    As I was picking up my stuff from the other side of the x-ray machine another guard saw me slip the Calypso back into the front pocket of my jeans. She came over and said 'Excuse me, sir. What kind of knife is that?' I said, it's a small Spyderco folder, expecting a scene. She replied 'Oh, sorry, I meant what model Sypderco is it? It didn't look like a Delica, but I was sure it was a Spyderco'.

    Took me a while to pick my jaw off the ground, but there you go. Despite state and federal laws to the contrary, there seems to be an unwritten Australian knife law: "if you're not being a dickhead, you won't be bothered by the law.'

    Cheers,
    Tim
     
  18. Jason Kitta

    Jason Kitta

    29
    Oct 9, 1998
    Just a wonderful thought for you all.

    I saw a hiring add for Detroit Metro security. They where offering 7.00 to 7.50 an hour. KFC was offering 8.00hr.

    I did ask a detroit metro securit guards once about carring a knife on board and was told as long as the blade was under 4 inches there where no other restrictions.

    Jason
     
  19. dsvirsky

    dsvirsky

    Aug 2, 1999
    Jason,
    That is indeed a very large part of the problem. As it is in knives and whisky, so it is in security guards: you get what you pay for.

    While it's true that the SF Bay Area is an expensive place to live, you should see the quality of candidates we got for a temporary file clerk position that pays $9.38/hr. None of them were hired; I guess they're now airport security guards.

    ------------------
    Dave

    Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of More Knives
     
  20. Will.223

    Will.223

    459
    Mar 1, 2000
    Brian_T,
    All I can say is that's one hell of a note. I never liked O'Hare anyway. If security tried to confiscate my "Dragonfly" I would have made a scene. I couldn't have helped myself. I know that we aren't talking about an expensive pocketknife here, however any pocketknife that I choose as a "carry" knife becomes something I am emotionally attached to. I just wouldn't have been able to hand it over to some dummy that thought that such a small pocketknife presented a threat.

    Will

    ------------------
    Mendacity is the
    system we live in.
     

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