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Technique questions

Joined
Jul 28, 2003
Messages
2,790
I have a couple of questions for you guys before I get into some stock-removal knife making!

I plan on using loveless bolts to secure my scales. How exactly do these work? I've seen pictures of them, but I'm not exactly sure if I know what's going on. Are there different configurations for these?

Also, if I was going to use a vulcanized liner that I got from KnifeKits.com, would I just sandwich it between the epoxied tang and epoxied scale as is or is there something else that should be done to it to make sure no moisture is trapped inside? I figured that the original treatment of it would make it unreceptive to moisture, but I don't need to soak it in anything first do I?

On the knife that Brian Goode made for me, there is a very distinct hamon that bisects the blade, and he uses a torch for HT. What is the approximate technique to achieve a distinct, even heat treat and hamon? Do you heat along your desired hamon first and then flip the knife back and forth while heating inside of that area?

Thanks for any help you can give! I have a big hunk of black g-10 and red vulcanized liner, and my dad is a machinist and can get me some 0-1 through McMaster-Carr when his company puts in another order, so those are probably the materials I'll be using for my first knife.
 
Loveless or Corby bolts are used by countersinking the scales, then grinding the heads off. A step drill is the best way to countersink your handle scales. Set a stop on your drill press because it really sucks when you drill too deep, like all the way through.

When using liners. I use a hole punch and make holes within the border of the scales. Essentially, get everything cut out first, the pin holes all aligned, the liners in place, then finish the front end of the scales. You don't get a second chance when they are on the knife.

Punch holes in the liner material, lightly sand it to flatten any ridges around the holes, then put it together with epoxy. The holes allow the epoxy to bond from scale to liner to tang. The epoxy gives you all the moisture barrier you will need. Vulcanized liner material is waterproof.

The quench line you refer to really is not a hamon. It is merely the line created between the hardened and non hardened area of the blade. Using a toech, heat the edge from side to side, starting at the ricasso and working towards the tip. When the edge becomes non magnetic, heat slightly more then quench in warm oil. Set up a platform in the oil reservoir so you can only immerse the edge, maybe 1/3 of the way up the blade. Rock it toward the tip, back and forth, until the blade turns dark, as in no longer glowing, then go ahead and immerse the rest. Keep the blade oriented vertically the whole time. If you get it leaned over it will warp frpm uneven heating.

You can do this with O-1, but you'll get better performance from O-1 with a furnace, holding it at temp. A cryo cycle is good, too. A steel like 5160 or a 10xx series steel responds better to this type treatment.

Good luck on your first knife.

Gene
 
I have a couple of questions for you guys before I get into some stock-removal knife making!

I plan on using loveless bolts to secure my scales. How exactly do these work? I've seen pictures of them, but I'm not exactly sure if I know what's going on. Are there different configurations for these?

I bet I know what you can't figure. You are saying to yourself, There will be a screw head on one side and it wont look the same.

The loveless bolts consist of 2 round nuts and a bolt. You thread one of the nuts on all the way up to the screw head. pass this through the handle and thread the other nut on and snug the whole thing down.

Gene recomended a step drill, You can do better and spend less by buying a piloted counterbore. You get a flat bottom hole with ba counterbore. Those step drills are a waste of money in my opinion. ($15-$20) You probably can get a counterbore with interchangeable pilots for the same money.
 
I like the counterboring drill that Pop's has made. It is a four flute counterbore that has flutes on the pilot,too. You drill an under-size guide hole and run the counterbore down until the seat depth is where you want. He sells them for all the sizes of Corby rivets he sells. I'm sure they will work for Loveless rivets ,too.The fit is perfect.
BTW - Corby rivets are easier and better looking than Loveless rivets in my opinion.
 
I epoxy my liners onto the scales before ANYTHING. Simply sand everything rough and gert both sides coated with epoxy. Cut the liner about 1/2" wider to catch the oozing epoxy that squishes out the sides.

Use spring clamps to clamp them to a flat piece of glass.

You can use whatever you have to do it your way though :)

be sure you dont grind those corby's too much. There hollow inside :)

Lovelesses are easier for me :)
 
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