• STOP USING PAYPAL FRIENDS & FAMILY
    Please, help us prevent you getting ripped off because someone got their account compromised by reusing their email & password. Read the new best practices for using the Exchange FAQ page.

The Lynn Griffith Marksman: First Impressions

stjames

Sebenzanista
Joined
Oct 26, 1998
Messages
6,465
I received my latest knife from Lynn this week; a White Micarta handled version of his Marksman design, with a few modifications. At my request Lynn shortened the blade to 3-1/2”, a more manageable length for my purposes. He also happened to have a thicker stock of White Micarta from a mis-shipment he received that he put to good use on the handle.

Fit and finish is superb, from the smooth contoured grip to the keen edge of the blade. The flat grind is perfect, with the blade gracefully tapering down to the point as the spine drops to the tip. The edge is as flat as a razor, and just as sharp. Part of this is the thinner edge he put on the blade for me. Most of Lynn’s customers are in Law Enforcement or the Military, so a thick, tough blade is essential, but having some experience with the performance he gets out of ATS-34 I expect the blade will more than stand up to the work I plan to use it for.

The knife is quite simply one of the most comfortable hand tools that I have ever owned. It has the standard handle design found on all of Lynn’s Belt Knife Series, a single finger cutout and a palm swell, with a red liner under the Micarta scales for a very handsome look. As I said, mine has a thicker grip than usual, one that really fits my hand. I haven’t had a chance to put the knife to hard use yet, but I turned an old broomstick into a pile of shavings in about half an hour this afternoon, with nary a hot spot to show for it. Easy to control and a joy to use, my wife was not happy about the mess, though.

I highly recommend working with Lynn to anyone that enjoys a finely crafted tool. And I do mean with him, as we had many enjoyable and interesting discussions as the project progressed. One of the true joys of owning a custom knife is the relationships you develop with the maker, and Lynn is one of the nicest, easiest to deal with people I have had the pleasure of meeting, even if it has only been virtually.


------------------
James Segura
San Francisco, CA



 
Good review James. I am interested to here how the thinner edge holds up for you. I thinned the edge on my Patrolman so I could touch it up on the sharpmaker and the angles would match. For me the thinner edge is great. Lynn could be called a wizzard with ats34, as even with the thin edge I now have, there is not even a hint of wanting to chip, and it is a wonderful edge holder. How do you like the white micarta? I think it is extremely classy looking on my Patrolman. Best looking knife I have, that is until I can get one with the red handles (one of these days Lynn). You say hes a good guy to work with, even if only over the web. True, he is a nice guy here, but I visited his shop, and he is a hell off a nice guy in person as well. I look forward to reading more about your knife. Maybe you ould post a pic of yours?

Richard
 
I've been honing my Sniper on a flat stone to keep the original bevel and edge. Easy to do on a strait edged blade, and it keeps the tip nice and pointy.

The white Micarta is very attractive, though I like the grain pattern on the black as well. With all the choices Lynn offers in handle materials, he should be able to please most tastes.

------------------
James Segura
San Francisco, CA



 
I have written and re-written this response ten times so far with out submitting it. The friendship an kind words from you guys is overwhelming to me. I hope you both know how much I value your friendhip. Since I don't know what els to say, I will just say



Thank you


------------------
Lynn Griffith-Knifemaker

My website
GriffithKN@aol.com


 
OK Lynn,
The next time St, James orders a knife from you I want you to automatically make me the same one FIRST!! As I recall, this happened with the Sniper...... I was reading the review from St.James a few days before mine arrived. Now its deja-vu all over again with the Marksman!! My Marksman is on its way... AHHHHHHHHHH!!!
Lynn, I am saying this on record, A deposit for a Raven is in the mail !!!! Ha!! There I did it!!! I will get a Raven first!!!!
I think the knife bug just bit real bad....
Neil
PS: St.James, nice review! I will still be pleasantly surprised when my Marksman arrives!

------------------
New Hawkbill Pics!
http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Meeting/5520/index.html

 
Neil, trying to sneak one by me, eh? Guess that I'll get the second Raven
wink.gif


------------------
James Segura
San Francisco, CA



 
Maybe this should be a thread unto itself, but what do most of you like the Wharncliff style blade for on larger knives?

I like the Wharncliff style, but I tend to think of it as a delicate task blade for use on smaller knives. I am really interested to know!

Thanks, guys!

Clay

------------------
Clay Fleischer
clay_fleischer@yahoo.com
AKTI Member A000847

Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the recipient who doesn't get it.
 
I posted the following on the Custom forum - figured it would be appropriate here too!

Lynn,
Enjoyed the conversation yesterday - I think you have made a wise & hopefully profitable decision. HEAR YE! HEAR YE! Lynn made a decision yesterday to offer all of his models with Talonite blades - having talked to Lynn & knowing of the quality of his work I have no doubt they will be awesome - Talonite will be fantastic for his tacticals - zero worries about conditions & incredible edgeholding. I have placed Order Nbr. 1 for a Talonite Tracker with Carbon Fiber scales - If you are planning to get a knife from Lynn in the near future you might want to think about getting your order in soon - I have a feeling his backlog may zoom like Rob Simonich's shortly.

Bill
 
Clay, I find that too long a warncliffe does get in its own way. The piece Lynn made for me is a bit shorter than his standard model, with a blade length of 3.5”. It excels at cutting sheeting and packing materiel (perfect for the Holiday Season), and is great for general bench work, as you don’t have to tilt your wrist up to penetrate with the point. Having a long, strait edge is great for light “chopping”, and also works well for “whittling” type tasks, as you don’t have any extra blade wasted on an upsweep when all you need is the edge and a point. When you want to go from big, general slicing to small precise cuts in a hurry, this size warncliffe works well.

------------------
James Segura
San Francisco, CA
 
Thanks for the info, James! Very well put!

May have to be my next selection...

Clay

------------------
Clay Fleischer
clay_fleischer@yahoo.com
AKTI Member A000847

Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the recipient who doesn't get it.
 
A Talonite (R) Wharnecliff blade?

Sounds sweet, mine would need to be a shorter blade as I agree with StJames in the fact that a longer blade tends to get in it's own way, but I'd shorten the blade to about 2 3/4 to 3" max but leave the handle the same profile for a comfortable grip.

Thin edged for slicing as well would be nice.

I'll have to think about this one as I could use a knife like that....there I go again!

G2

------------------
"There are no dangerous weapons;
there are only dangerous men."
.......... Robert A. Heinlein, 1959


G2 Leatherworks
 
Just a little word of advise when it comes to Talonite. You don't want the blade to be too thin or pointy. Remember that this alloy tops out at around RC43. This makes it very prone to bending in thinner blades. Especially the needle sharp points of some of Lynn's designs need a harder (tougher) material. Otherwise the point can be bend/broken easily.

Talonite is a very specialized alloy and not a "Do-it-all". It's a nice performer, but it needs to be used in a suitable design which should try to eliminate its weaknesses. Thin, pointy blades are done much better in current high carbon steels.
 
Back
Top