The Mystical Swing

Joined
Jun 11, 2008
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3
I keep reading that chopping is all in the swing, unfortunantly cant seem to find a reference to this technique. Chopping small stuff around 1/2"-1" i can usually take out in on shot, larger stuff seems to take longer then I would have thought based on the other stuff. Make me wonder if it is my technique ( as I really dont have one) are there any videos or guides to this or mostly just practice.
Thanks
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2006
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7,035
I think if you read the FAQ at HimalayanImports.com, they describe the technique.

Here's what works for me (sorry, no pics):
First I hold the kukri with the center rib between my ring and little finger. I have a tight grip with the ring and little finger, looser grip with the middle and forefingers and thumb.

Next, I hold it as high as I can, and start a good down swing (let the weight of the kukri and gravity do most of the work, you tell it where to go). Just before I make contact with the sweet spot, I give my wrist a little snap (it's going to take practice to get the timing right). CS Graves gave a good description in another thread: basically, it looks like you're using a whip.

At least for me, using a rigid grip and a straight in chop like for a hatchet greatly diminishes the chopping power of the kukri.
 
Joined
Jun 11, 2008
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The whipping tactic seems to work good as well as the hold. I was holding very solidly, now I understand why the rear of the handle is shaped that way. Thank you for the advise. The blade is just a $23 khuk 12", I'm think about an 18" or so CAK, how much better would this be for chopping thru stuff in your experiences
Thanks alot for the Info
 
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Jan 28, 2006
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IMO chopping efficiency goes up a great deal with the larger kukris, especially the Ang Kholas. My favorite is a 20" CAK -- I was absolutely amazed at how well it chops. Outside of my full-sized axe, nothing I have out chops it (OK, I have a 25" CAK, it probably outchops it too).

18" is a good size. You sacrifice some chopping ability for some weight savings. My 20" is a little over 3 pounds, not a lightweight by any means.

A little hint on the larger kukris: get a baldric type setup for carrying it, it rides much better -- I hardly notice it -- than on a belt. Belt carry with the larger models will have your pants around your ankles in no time!
 
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Jun 13, 2006
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Aye, there'll be a world of difference between a 12" and 18" models... heck, the 18" still has considerably more heft than a 15" khuk.
 
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Jan 30, 2002
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7,259
consider your chopping technique as if you were whipping the sweet spot edge to your intended point of contact. You want the highest velocity/greatest impact to hit at point of aim. By using the pivot points of your shoulder, then elbow, then wrist into the chop you are creating a "bull-whip" of flexibility and and momentum.

Hang on, read the safety thread, anticipate the line of flight of the blade...both intended and possible deflection...and practice slowly, then with greater force. In a bit, it will become second nature. A khuk is not a belt axe.

Be safe, have fun.



Kis
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2006
Messages
3,724
Okay, I know I've been here a while and everything, but I just want to check with those of you with more experience again... is the sweet spot on a given khuk typically just below the "belly" of the blade?
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2007
Messages
957
IMO chopping efficiency goes up a great deal with the larger kukris, especially the Ang Kholas. My favorite is a 20" CAK -- I was absolutely amazed at how well it chops. Outside of my full-sized axe, nothing I have out chops it (OK, I have a 25" CAK, it probably outchops it too).

18" is a good size. You sacrifice some chopping ability for some weight savings. My 20" is a little over 3 pounds, not a lightweight by any means.

A little hint on the larger kukris: get a baldric type setup for carrying it, it rides much better -- I hardly notice it -- than on a belt. Belt carry with the larger models will have your pants around your ankles in no time!

It's also worth it to keep the chape from digging into your calf when negotiating inclines.
 
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