The Way Of the Street "Street 101" Part 1

Discussion in 'Chris Caracci's Urban Jungle' started by Darren Laur, Jan 5, 2002.

  1. Darren Laur

    Darren Laur

    34
    Dec 12, 2001
    Street 101:



    Acknowledgements:



    In preparing this post, I have attempted to put into writing some of the information that I have gleaned over the years specific to self protection and the “way of the street” In doing so , I had the opportunity to integrate a number of ideas and concepts from others in the field. To say that all of the information in this post was totally mine, would only ignore those people who have made this work possible.

    I believe that there is no such thing as the “ultimate” fighting form. Every combative system has its own set of strengths and weaknesses. I believe the secret is to recognize and acknowledge those weaknesses and then go elsewhere to strengthen them. In doing so, there are a number of people who I must thank for the content of this post. Some of the below noted instructors/coaches/teachers I know personally and have trained with, others I only known through their own published works. It is because of these people that I have been able to strengthen my weaknesses and make this post possible:


    Albert Carty

    Gil Puder

    Tony Blauer

    Bradley Steiner

    Marc McYoung

    Peyton Quinn

    Sammy Franco

    Richard Dimitri

    Geoff Thompson

    Jim Grover

    Jerry Van Cook






    Taking It To The Streets:


    The Police:


    First of all, I am a police officer and have some knowledge in this topic. Most people believe that the police are the first line of defense. In a perfect world this may be true, but the fact is “YOU” are going to be the first line of defense. It is a fact that most police department are far more “reactive” to crime than “proactive.” Although I would love to see a police officer on every corner, the fact remains that this will never happen. In our world, there are more criminals that there are police officers, this is why we call what we do the “thin blue line”. Police officers understand that if the criminal element was to ban together as one cohesive entity, such as what happened in the L.A. riots after the Rodney King incident, there would be little police could do to regain control in the short term.

    It is also a sad fact that unlike 30-40 years ago when most of the criminal element feared the police, today most do not and only see us as an “annoyance” to their criminal activity. Most of the experienced criminals know how not to get caught as well. We in policing usually catch the inexperienced, why?, because the experienced criminals have learned from their mistakes. The next sad thing is that even if the police do catch the criminal, many are soon released.


    The Courts:

    Even if the criminal is caught red handed committing the crime, the next step is court and the Criminal Justice system, or should I say “The Criminal’s Justice System.” Many criminals see the justice system as an advantage rather than a disadvantage. Why?, because most, including their lawyers, know the ins and outs of the judicial jungle, especially when it comes to a legal technicality or plea bargan. The fact remains that in some countries the criminal has nothing to loose but everything to gain by going to court. In some cases the punishment from the courts, if found guilty, does not deter the criminal from continuing on with their actions. The term “let the punishment fit the crime” seldom exists, but even if convicted to jail, there is a very real chance that the criminal will only have to serve 1/3 of their sentence anyways.


    Who is the Street Predator:

    So who is the Street Predator? The answer is “anyone”, but the average inmate housed in the Canadian Correctional system for violent crimes is:

    - male between the ages of 15-24 years

    - 5’9” - 6’0” tall

    - 175 – 190 lbs


    Most street predators can be split up into two categories; “The Amateur” and “The Professional”


    The Amateur:

    The amateur is an “ego” based animal who is looking for a fight “just because.” To be preyed upon by the amateur you do not have to be doing anything wrong, you just have to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. This beast is usually very identifiable;

    - usually walks with attitude
    - elbows pushed away from body
    - verbally aggressive and rude to people within a few feet
    - confrontations are usually triggered by eye contact


    Some of the “Ritualized” combative signs that are apparent from the amateur prior to contact, but not limited to, include:

    - splaying arms to express exclamation
    - beckoning with finger
    - nodding of head, usually accompanies finger beckoning
    - bulging eyes
    - acquires innate fighting stance
    - will close distance during confrontation


    The Professional:

    The professional street predator is someone who I like to identify as the serial mugger, serial rapist, serial killer. These beasts usually attack for profit and not because they want to fight. These animals are a little harder to identify as they merge into society quite well and usually prey upon targets that have “no” situational awareness. When the professional strikes a target they usually follow a seven step process of target acquisition:
     
  2. Darren Laur

    Darren Laur

    34
    Dec 12, 2001
    Step #1: victim selection:

    - looking for subjects with no situational awareness
    - attacks usually occur in sparsely populated locations out the view of witnesses and therefore reduces the chances of being seen heard or caught

    Step #2: Victim Stalking:

    - Once a target has been identified the professional will usually stalk first
    - They are waiting for the time and place that suits their need for privacy and control



    Step #3: Victim/Predator Positioning:


    - the professional must place themselves in position to either attack by surprise or engage in a “street Interview”
    - remember this beast is a lazy animal and does not want to fight but totally overwhelm

    The professional will usually use one of five “relative” positioning tactics to set their intended victim up for attack:

    1) Closing:

    - Most common, walks directly up to target to get as close as they can
    - the closer they get the more success he will have in his abilities to overwhelm and control
    - this is why the “reaction gap” is so important once you have identified a person as a threat. If the threat has breached the gap when you have told him not to, he has clearly announced that his intentions are not good

    2) Cornering/ Trapping:

    - this is the second most commonly used tactic
    - will want to corner you between himself, you, and any safe exit point


    3) Surprise

    - Surprise is the primary tactic that an attacker depends upon for full advantage



    4) Pincer:

    - usually used by two or more criminals
    - one circles while the other distracts you
    - one attacker follows from behind and while you are focused on them, there is a second attacker just up ahead
    - things to be aware of, two people standing across from one another in a narrow space such as a hallway, staircase, or alley

    5) Surround:

    - most common in “packs” or “swarms”
    - one in the pack will distract while the others surround
    - instead of a fast swarm, the pack will usually drift towards you so as not to alert you to their intentions


    Step #4: Testing the Waters:

    - only used if the element of surprise is not available
    - here the predator will use one or more “street interviewing tactics” to see if you are a low risk high gain target


    A) reasonable request interview:

    - will ask you for the time, match, cigarette, spare change, directions
    - as you are complying with their request, the attacker moves into a surprise attack position.
    - This is a classic “distraction technique”

    B) The Distant Interview:

    - takes place from a distance
    - attacker is assessing your body language and awareness level
    - the professional uses this method regularly to identify targets of opportunity
    - most criminals are in plain view but because of no “situational awareness” the intended victim fails to recognize the fact that they are there

    C) The Escalating Interview:

    - usually takes place in a pack situation
    - starts off small but builds to the boiling point
    - weapons are usually involved
    - men are really bad for this because of “ego”


    D) the Bully Interview:

    - will say things to you such as “ what the **** are you looking at”
    - the attacker hopes that by saying this to you, you will respond in kind thus giving them the reason that they were looking for to engage you either verbally and or physically
    - this interview usually starts with the eye glare which then moves to the bully question which then leads to an escalating interview and then goes physical



    E) the Bully Interview:

    - Continual eye contact made (non-verbal challenge)
    - The bully interview: what the **** are you looking at
    - The approach towards you
    - The bully question reiterated
    - The response from you; usually a verbal challenge
    - Escalating interview back and forth
    - Actual physical challenge: let’s ****ing go right now
    - Single syllable replies back and forth
    - The actual attack; usually a hooking sucker punch
    - During the last few stages prior to actual physical attack, not uncommon to have finger pointing, arm flailing, and slight one or two hand pushes. These are done as an intelligence gathering technique to ascertain your intentions and abilities to fight back




    Step #5: The Assesment Stage:

    - if after steps 1-4 there is a positive assessment by the professional, they will usually attack using the element of surprise. If there is a negative assessment and the victim appears to be ware of what is going on, the attacker will usually abort their attack and move onto another safe target


    Step #6: Using Threats Of Violence:

    - If a positive threat assessment has been made by the professional in step #5, it is usually followed by verbl threats which are sometimes aided by a weapon or an accomplice or both
    - These threats are very direct and extremely violent in nature using very course language
    - The professionals “goal” here is to create a state of “hyper vigilance” to cause you to go into “brain fart” mode. Why ? because the professional understands that the mind guides the body. If they can get you into brain fart mode their in control.
    - It is also very common that the attacker will promise not to hurt you if you comply with their requests. Why? They don’t want you to make a scene that increases the risks of them being seen, heard, or caught.




    Step #6: the Attack:

    - after step #6 the professional now engages
    - some of these attacks may be minimal, intended only to freeze you allowing them to take what they want. Most, however, will be frenzied and severe with onw intent, to totally disable or even kill you before you can launch an effective counter attack



    Although both the amateur and professional attacker are two different beasts, both will exhibit one or more pre-assaultive signs (Ritualized Combat) that if you know what to look for are real good indicators ( warning bells) to let you know what may be happening:


    Ritualized Combat Signs That An Assault May Not Be Imminent But Possible:

    - head, neck, shoulders go back
    - face is red, twitching, jerking
    - lips pushed forward bearing teeth
    - breathing is fast and shallow
    - sweating
    - thousand mile glare
    - exaggerated movements
    - finger pointing/ head pecking
    - totally ignores you
    - gives you excessive attention during normal conversation such as direct uninterrupted eye contact
    - goes from totally uncooperative to totally cooperative
    - acts stoned or drunk
    - directs anger towards other items such as tables, chairs, walls


    Here create distance, awareness level up.



    Ritualized Combat Assault is Imminent:

    - face goes from red to white
    - lips tighten over teeth
    - breathing is fast and shallow
    - change of stance, body blades and shoulders drop
    - hands closed tight into a fist ( usually autonomic)
    - bobbing up and down on feet, or rocking back and forth
    - target glance to your body parts
    - putting head and chin down (protects eyes and airway)
    - stops all movements
    - dropping of their center or lowering of body
    - shedding cloths ( very common)
    - full sentences to one syllable reply


    If you see these signs and can not walk or talk your way out, you take FIRST STRIKE and continue with compound attack.



    Five tactical Advantages Of The Criminal:

    Remember, most attackers have five very real advantages over most of their victims:


    Advantage #1: Confidence

    - will usually not attack unless he has full confidence in his abilities to win the physical encounter
    - Confidence comes from ability to use the tactic of the sucker punch or the the ambush to his full advantage

    Advantage #2: Experience

    - Experience comes from actual street application rather than a training studio or martial arts school
    - Experience comes from real lessons learned on the street. Both good and bad




    Advantage #3: Competence:

    - Most have one or two techniques that they have mastered to some degree
    - This mastery comes from actual application in the real world
    - Because of this fact, they know what works most of the time, and what does not
    - Their combatives training is learned by doing under “real” street conditions


    Advantage #4: Tactics:

    - a criminal’s tactics are that of simplicity, the simpler it is the better it will work
    - when they do physically attack, it is usually a continuous attack until the intended victim has been knocked out or grounded
    - physical attacks are usually very brutal and violent
    - usually the criminal uses the advantage of FIRST STRIKE



    Advantage #5: Psychological:


    - Most people believe that this **** will never happen to me and because of this fact when attacked, go into a state of hyper vigilance which is a huge advantage to the attacker
     
  3. Darren Laur

    Darren Laur

    34
    Dec 12, 2001
    Five tactical Advantages Of The Criminal:

    Remember, most attackers have five very real advantages over most of their victims:


    Advantage #1: Confidence

    - will usually not attack unless he has full confidence in his abilities to win the physical encounter
    - Confidence comes from ability to use the tactic of the sucker punch or the the ambush to his full advantage

    Advantage #2: Experience

    - Experience comes from actual street application rather than a training studio or martial arts school
    - Experience comes from real lessons learned on the street. Both good and bad




    Advantage #3: Competence:

    - Most have one or two techniques that they have mastered to some degree
    - This mastery comes from actual application in the real world
    - Because of this fact, they know what works most of the time, and what does not
    - Their combatives training is learned by doing under “real” street conditions


    Advantage #4: Tactics:

    - a criminal’s tactics are that of simplicity, the simpler it is the better it will work
    - when they do physically attack, it is usually a continuous attack until the intended victim has been knocked out or grounded
    - physical attacks are usually very brutal and violent
    - usually the criminal uses the advantage of FIRST STRIKE



    Advantage #5: Psychological:


    - Most people believe that this **** will never happen to me and because of this fact when attacked, go into a state of hyper vigilance which is a huge advantage to the attacker



    So Why Do Street Fights Occur:


    Pride and Ego reasons are most common. Why?

    - a person perceives that their ego has been challenged
    - need to save face by fighting the person who they see as their challenger
    - this is especially true if the person who’s ego was challenges is with a peer group/gang. It is important when dealing with groups, a challenge to one, is a challenge to all


    Alcohol and Drugs:

    - The number one contributing factor as to why fights occur is alcohol and or drugs
    - I like to call alcohol “liquid courage”
    - Both alcohol and drugs override a person’s thought process to the point where reality and fantasy are one in the same. Both remove a person’s common sense factor


    Property, Body, Life:


    Here the attacker could want specific things from you including:


    Property:

    money, wallet, credit cards, jewelry, clothing


    Body:

    Pride and ego assaults, Sexual Assaults, Enjoyment Of A Violent Act


    Life:

    Self explanatory




    Real Fights Are Not Pretty:

    - not choreographed like you see on T.V. or in some martial arts schools
    - Most are very sloppy, fast, and gross in appearance
    - Most are not back and forth occurrences. The first person who gets in the first good neutralizing blow usually wins the fight
    - Even a well trained combatant’s technique will usually get very sloppy after the first or second shots are thrown
    - This is why in a street fight, “functionality of technique” is far more important that “perfect technique”. If what you do is pretty and perfect but not functional, what good is it going to be in the real world


    Most Street Fights Are Over Very Quickly:

    - most fights are usually over within the first 5-10 seconds
    - Very rare to see a street fight last longer that 10-15 seconds



    Most Street Fights Are Decided By A Strike to The Head:

    - most street fighters are head hunters
    - they understand that the brain is the computer of the body. You knock it out and the body will follow
    - this is why in a street fight you “MUST” protect your head and neck


    Most Street Fights If Not Over Quickly, Can Involve Grappling And Ground Fighting:

    - if the fight is not over quickly, it can end up in a grapple and then go to ground
    - Why?, if a person is getting the **** pounded out of them, they will usually want to close the distance in an attempt to smother/control the punches that they are being hit with
    - Once grounded, you will usually be **** kicked “curbed” by the attacker, if he is standing, and his friends if any. These kicks are usually targeted for the head and upper body.
    - This is why “ballistic” ground fighting techniques are essential for getting back onto your feet as quickly as possible. Unlike the UFC we can NOT spend a lot of time on the ground



    The Multiple Opponent Factor:

    - Most attackers will have some kind of back up to help them out if they find themselves in trouble
    - If you fall into the trap that you are only fighting one person, you will become tunnel locked, and the next thing you will find out is someone is on your back
    - Always be aware of the second or third opponent in a street fight
    - MUST always be thinking multiples on the street



    The Weapon Reality:

    - There are more and more fights taking place where a weapon was brought to use before, during, or after the confrontation. Especially knives
    - Always be aware and prepared for a weapon in a street fight at anytime




    The Unwanted Friend Factor:


    - most fights usually have friends and acquaintances looking on from both sides
    - these friends will often attempt to separate combatants in an effort to stop the fight
    - this is very dangerous to you due to the fact that as your friend is pulling you away, they are tying you up giving an advantage to your attacker
    - this can take place before, during, and after a fight as well
    - Although your friends may be trying to help you, unless on the same page tactically, they are in fact placing you at a disadvantage
    -


    The Offensive Mindset:

    - more often than not, the combatant who strikes first and maintains the offensive mindset, usually win the fight
    - in a street fight do not go defensive, attack the attack, go offensive, you deploy FIRST STRIKE and continue with a compound attack




    So there it is, my two cents, I hope you enjoyed it


    Strength and Honor

    Darren Laur
    Integrated Street Combatives
    [email protected]
     
  4. Jameson

    Jameson

    294
    Oct 3, 1998
    GREAT POST. I heard you say Canada early on, are you a LEO in Canada? Read: Mountie? LOL Anyway.

    I work part-time as a bouncer in popular night clubs here on Long Island from time to time. I find that the street-fight stuff you ahve mentioned is pretty much true. Most of my experiences with fights have been outside said establishments, and usually trying to break them up. However, when they are home from school my troop of friends (Usually bout 15 guys and 8 or so girls) almost always try and make it too the bar I am working at for a few hours. Now these guys grew up in an upper-middle class neighborhood, and I personally have never seen ayone of them instigate a real fight with a stranger in the bar. With each other a diff story, usually over women.

    Yeah the real fist-fights usally last about 10 seconds, and end up with both on the ground before bystanders jump in and either all contact each other first, or drag the downed players out. The bar I most frequently work at is located outside Hofstra University, and the people that hang there dont carry knives, at least on pocket clips. We dont do searches, but my trained folder eye can spot a knife from a cell-phone clip from a mile away. I read character and have NEVER taken a blade from someone. Did get to handle a sebenza once, the kid knew his stuff!!!!

    JC
     
  5. Darren Laur

    Darren Laur

    34
    Dec 12, 2001
    Yes, I am a sergeant with the Victoria Police Department here in British Columbia Canada.

    I am glad you enjoyed my post

    Darren laur
    Integrated Street Combatives
     
  6. Andy Prisco

    Andy Prisco

    Nov 2, 1999
    Darren,

    Welcome to the Jungle! :)

    ...with all due respect for your post based on your experience, I would like to remind you that this forum is centered on CJ Caracci's training in, and approach to, the tactical world.

    As you appear to be new, allow me to kindly ask that you use better judgement in the future when using this particular forum for the kind of unsolicited post you initiated.

    I hope you do not take offense and I encourage you to stick around.

    Thanks,

    Moderator: Chris Caracci's Urban Jungle Forum
     
  7. Darren Laur

    Darren Laur

    34
    Dec 12, 2001
    Andy:

    Thanks for your reponse to my post. It was not my purpose to advertise my school, which I never did, but rather to share my thoughts with others, including CJ Caracci, to get their thoughts and any other contributions that may have to my post. The whole purpose of my post was to share information, which I find lacking, in so many other posts on the net which are more concerned with the "my system of fighting is better thatn your system of fighting.". I have enjoyed reading the many articles on this site, and look forward to more. Again, I believe that Knoledge and the Undersatnding Of That Knowledge Is Power. What I attempted to do with my post, was to share some of that knowledge with others, including CJ Caracci, for comment.

    If I have offended, I did not mean to do so purposely.

    Darren
     
  8. Butcher

    Butcher

    239
    Dec 5, 2001
    Thanks Darren. I truely enjoyed and picked up some pointers. I will share this info. with my friends, again thanks.....
     
  9. SIFU1A

    SIFU1A

    May 12, 2001
    personally, i enjoyed the thread, thought it had some good pointers, lots of good info, maybe wrong forum but good material nontheless - imho threads like this c ould give CJ a op to critique the info, add input, etc,which, imho, is all the good-point being we can get some good info that otherwise might not have appeared in this forum and gotten feedback from the man, CJ- i didnt get the impression the guy was pushing his school, perhaps didnt read close enough, but didnt even realise he ran one lol - or am i missing something here.....?


    sifu
     
  10. rawhide_clyde

    rawhide_clyde

    786
    Dec 23, 2000
    Darren,
    Most excellent info!!! I also shared your post with my family, both nuclear and extended. Thanks for sharing it!!
    Regards,
    Clyde
     
  11. Darren Laur

    Darren Laur

    34
    Dec 12, 2001
    Thanks for your review, but remember alot of credit goes to those instructors/ teachers/ and coaches that I mention at the beginning of my post. I would encourage everyone to look them up, read their books, watch their videos, and go to their web sites, they are a wealth of knowledge. But remember give credit where credit is due as I tried to do !!!!

    Darren
     
  12. Weapon_X_711

    Weapon_X_711

    102
    Sep 23, 1999
    Darren,
    I really liked your post, it distills a lot of different info. Into one easy to read thread, I would have to agree with Andy Prisco as to it being posted in the wrong forum.
    The Practical Tactical forum, would have the best place for this thread. For a couple of reasons, first it is much more open and friendly forum. Second it is a much better forum, everybody's opinion carries equal weight and no fragile ego's to step on.
    Besides I am willing to bet that this forum will be nothing more but a fart in the wind in a coulple of months, as in gone.
    One last thing, you might want to check out the cover of CJ's SEAL Workout video tape. Double M60 bandelero's on a guy with no shirt and firing a machine gun, with some really cool shades's on:barf:
     
  13. SIFU1A

    SIFU1A

    May 12, 2001
    hey, ya gotta pack those belts somewhere, and the sun always shines if ya are cool lol

    regrettably, i too think this forum is slowly going the way of the dodo bird, i havent seen CJ post here since before X-mas

    and i had high hopes for it too, hope things turn around for the better

    hope ya prove me wrong, CJ

    sifu
     

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