This Hatchet or That Tomahawk?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Wyoming762, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. Wyoming762

    Wyoming762

    21
    Feb 24, 2016
    Hello, I'm looking to add a new chopping tool in about the 2 lb range to my pack. The tools I'm looking at are the Gerber 17.5 Freescape and the CRKT Chogan T-Hawk. This will be used for bush campfires and the occasional pelvis. Maybe I'm not giving a big enough info, but I've always just used an old Estwing for my purposes, so I'm actually pretty axe ignorant. I would just appreciate some knowledgeable opinions on the advantages and disadvantages of hatchets vs heavier tomahawks in the bush, and on these two particular models.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 11, 2016
    IMHO you'd be better off with either a vintage hatchet head to hang ( you can put it on whatever handle length you like, it's more satisfying to do it yourself, and old axes need to be saved Instead of going to the scrapyard, and it in be done at a fairly low cost ), or maybe for your needs a marbles double bit hatchet ( not the Chinese stainless one ) the semi hand forged one made in condors el Salvador factory ( quality is better than the 2 your looking at and it's cheaper ) the advantages are being able to have one bit for wood work and the other for your game processing ( nessmuk is well known for using a db hatchet for those same reasons ) I understand wanting to replace the heavy all steel estwing. Do you want 2lb in the head or overall ? Cause a 1 1/4 - 1 1/2 l hatchet on an 18-20" handle should be pretty capable. Tomahawks will work and are nice and lightweight, but don't carry as much weight in the head for wood processing tasks.
     
  3. Wyoming762

    Wyoming762

    21
    Feb 24, 2016
    I'm looking for a 2 pound overall chopper.
    In what areas is the Conder higher quality than the Gerber? As these Fiskar/Gerber hatchets are made in Finland I understand them to be pretty good quality, especially when price is considered.

    Also, just thought I'd say that I know there are many who want a hatchet to have a wooded handle so it can be replaced in the field should it brake, but I'm not one of them, and, as much I respect the foresight of that opinion, won't let the line of thinking play into my purchase. I prefer something's quality, durability and capability, whether it is wood or something more modern, to begin with rather than ease of replacement later. Just my preferences, nothing against other's preferences.
     
  4. Lieblad

    Lieblad

    Jul 24, 2015
    ......
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
  5. Insipid Moniker

    Insipid Moniker Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 28, 2011
  6. tobiism

    tobiism

    Jun 28, 2013
    Took my Chogan camping this weekend and it did awesome. [​IMG]
     
  7. Wyoming762

    Wyoming762

    21
    Feb 24, 2016
    Let me throw another possibility in here; Condor Woodworker Axe. How does this stack up because it has caught my eye.
     
  8. MattPatches

    MattPatches

    34
    Apr 29, 2014
    Get yourself a hults bruk axe in the weight and pattern that you want. Superior quality steel and geometry. You will probably want to do some sharpening and profiling on it. I believe the carpenters axes to be very popular for your described usage. Husqvarna axes will serve you well, they are made by hults bruk as well. I love the members here at Bladeforums but find that axe advice here can really lead you astray due to some members brand loyalty for companies that primarily make knives. Good point of advice is to buy your axes from companies that produce forestry tools as a primary. Hultafors is a good brand as well. All are affordable and quality pieces. My recommendations are for solid "starter axes". If you find you really enjoy working with axes you may want to step up to a higher quality axe like Wetterlings or Gransfors Bruks before becomming a nut like me and refurbishing vintage heads and ordering custom axes from Autine in latvia. Lots to discover in the axe world, i highly reccomend joining the "Axe Junkies" page on facebook. Very knowledgeable and helpful crowd of folks.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2016
  9. Hacked

    Hacked

    947
    Jun 1, 2010
    Matt, I think you'll find for the most part that is not the case on this particular subforum. Sounds like you will fit right in here, as there are a lot of fans of Vintage axes here.

    I would also add Council Tools either a Hatchet, Boys axe, or Hudson Bay axe as well as hatchets produced by Vaughan since their hatchets are still made in the USA but not their larger axes.
     
  10. MattPatches

    MattPatches

    34
    Apr 29, 2014
    yeah council tools makes a good axe as well, if you aren't stepping up to their velvicut line though i would advise hand picking yours. And Hacked, great to hear!.
     
  11. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 11, 2016
    The fiskars made axes are known for having a really thick wedge like head ( they're really meant for home splitting use ) and using a softer steel. As far as handles go I can understand getting whatever works regardless of material, but there's just something special about the superior feel of a hickory ( or any suitable wood ) handle and there are so many options that there's no need to get any other type. I would either go vintage or check out council tool ( they've been making axes in the same place for over 100yrs ) if you did get a hawk ( a lot of people like the cold steels ) , I'd shape the grip area Into an octagon so it can't roll in your hand.
     
  12. Hacked

    Hacked

    947
    Jun 1, 2010
    To touch back on the original question of the advantages of one tool over the other I will toss in my few cents.

    The biggest touted advantage of a tomahawk that I have heard is the ease of replacing the handle in the field. This is due to most modern tomahawks slip fit eye construction. A limb or sapling can be fitted well enough to the eye with relative ease. On the other hand some of the downsides can be the common thin and flat cheeked profile that is not ideal for either chopping or splitting, this varies based on the hawk you choose. All of the ones with the slip fit handles will suffer from an extremely steep ramp limiting their splitting capabilities, you can however work around this.

    A hatchet or hand axe will have the certain advantages depending on what one you opt for. You can find one with a good profile for chopping and splitting that will perform well. The handle should be attached solid to the head which has both it's advantages and disadvantages. The handle with typically be a more ergonomic design with more options over most Hawks.

    In the end it comes down to preference.
     
  13. pathwinder14

    pathwinder14

    141
    Jun 4, 2012
    Cold Steel Rifleman's Hawk. 36.5 oz so it fits your weight requirements. Solid tomahawk.
     
  14. TattooBlade

    TattooBlade

    Apr 4, 2009
    Get a GB, Wetterlings or Hoffman and don't look back. Invest now and you'll have it for decades if not forever.
     
  15. chuxwan

    chuxwan

    423
    Aug 26, 2012
    Budget?
     

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