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This stuff leaves me scratching my head

Discussion in 'Knife Laws' started by Knife_Collector_101, Nov 28, 2018.

  1. Knife_Collector_101

    Knife_Collector_101

    19
    Sep 21, 2018
    So every once in a while I check up on the American Knife and Tool Institute's page to see what kind of updates they have as far as legislation and grassroots efforts relating to knives. I frequently check on their state automatic knife law page to see what kind of progress has been made on that front. It kind of puzzles me that a state like New Mexico still has a total ban on switchblades and balisongs in place when all its surrounding states have legalized them and they're now legal to one extent or another in over 40 states. They're kind of standing out like a sore thumb on that map. Wouldn't it come as no-brainer at some point to just lift the ban now that they're legal in all their neighboring states? Are their politicians just extra paranoid that stabbings might increase for some reason? What is the logic in them and other states like Washington, Delaware and Hawaii keeping these bans in place? Even states like Montana, Minnesota and Pennsylvania have exceptions for collectors and even New York and New Jersey, two of the worst states as far as penalties/enforcement go, allow balisongs and NY also has an exception for fishing/hunting license holders to use automatics (NYC is another story of course).

    I guess my question is, what would it take to convince these remaining states that still have these bans that automatics are no more dangerous than assisted knives and bearing flippers? From statistics I've seen, it doesn't seem like knife attacks have been an issue in any of the states that have legalized them. So what are the remaining states afraid of?

    Also, it seems like Washington, New Mexico and Hawaii are the only three states that don't allow balisongs and in California they have to be under 2 inches like with autos. Were there more balisong flipping accidents in these states? I'm sure enough people have played with trainers in those states long enough to become master flippers! Hehe! I just need somebody to enlighten me on this stuff and the logic behind it. Sorry if I'm beating a dead horse as I know this is a topic that's been discussed to death on these forums, but I'm fairly new and am always looking for new insights. It just seems to me like the stigma from the 50's should have totally gone to the wayside by now.
     
    tom19176 likes this.
  2. SoCalEDC

    SoCalEDC Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 4, 2015
    "Also, it seems like Washington, New Mexico and Hawaii are the only three states that don't allow balisongs and in California they have to be under 2 inches like with autos. Were there more balisong flipping accidents in these states?"

    No, these States are run by Democrats..plain and simple. My advice is move.
    It's only going to get worse I'm afraid.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2018
  3. tom19176

    tom19176 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 7, 2005
    I hope all these laws change for the better.....Just an FYI as bad as NYC is, the state exception allowing for possession for switchblades and gravity knives applies to NYC also, and their local law banning exposed carry and blades under 4" needed also has an exception for fishing and a few other activities....
     
  4. Knife_Collector_101

    Knife_Collector_101

    19
    Sep 21, 2018
    I know those states are run by Dems but it seems like activism by Doug Ritter and others has convinced some of them that these knives are no more dangerous than other knives. Their first big victory was in New Hampshire. That was in 2010 at a time when they had a state legislature controlled by Democrats and they even had a governor who was a Dem and the repeal of their bans on switchblades, dirks, daggers, and stilettos passed unanimously and it was signed by the governor. They even passed pre-emption unanimously as well. I know it may seem hopeless at times, but nothing's impossible. Ritter is determined to keep up the fight in New York despite the enormous mountain it has been to climb there.

    I know I was pretty much preaching to the choir with my post, but I guess I got a little frustrated last night thinking about the stupidity and absurdity of these laws and how it would only seem logical at some point once enough dominoes fall, the rest should just topple naturally.
     
  5. Knife_Collector_101

    Knife_Collector_101

    19
    Sep 21, 2018
    I know I mentioned New Jersey allowing balisongs earlier. I was going to say, I recently watched a video with New Jersey weapons lawyer Evan Nappen where he talked about Knife Rights and he mentioned in New Jersey that there is an exception in their statutes under which switchblades, gravity knives, stilettos, dirks and daggers can be possessed legally. He said it requires an "explainable lawful purpose" and mentioned they helped get a guy who got busted with a trunk full of switchblades off the hook after they proved he was a collector. So I guess New Jersey would qualify as a "collector state" as well.
     
  6. flphotog

    flphotog

    311
    Jul 10, 2014
    I'd be very careful relying on this site for knife legislation. Their page on FL pre-emption is totally wrong, I brought that to their attention a couple of years ago and it's still wrong.
    The best place to look is on the individual states pages, or the knifeup website is also very good.
     
  7. Knife_Collector_101

    Knife_Collector_101

    19
    Sep 21, 2018
    I know AKTI has some inaccuracies in some of their listings for different states, but I guess not every site can possibly keep up with all the info that's out there. Even some of the most reliable ones omit certain critical provisions outlined in some state laws. There seems to be more conflicting info about Virginia's knife laws than any other state I can think of. Some say possession/ownership of switchblades is banned entirely while others say possession/ownership is legal but carry isn't while others have said ownership and open carry is legal but sale and concealed carry isn't. Yet I've seen others say certain provisions in their law were previously struck down as unconstitutional. Such a mess.
     
  8. NMpops

    NMpops

    643
    Aug 9, 2010
    I spent almost 30 years in LE in New Mexico and do not remember any serious effort to change the knife or deadly weapon laws. Technically you can be charged with carrying a concealed deadly weapon if you pull a Swiss Army knife from your pocket and use it as a weapon. Never actually knew of anyone being charged, but it is possible. You can own switchblades and Balisongs, you just can't carry them. While NM has always been a democrat state, it has always been pro-gun and pro-self defense. Cops aren't known to hassle people about their knives.
    Last in my entire career, much of it as a detective, I can remember only 2 stabbings that involved pocket knives ( both Buck 110's) the rest were done with Kitchen cutlery and most were domestic situations.
     
    Charlie Mike and tom19176 like this.
  9. Knife_Collector_101

    Knife_Collector_101

    19
    Sep 21, 2018
    Appreciate your response NMpops. Always interesting to get input from people who have worked in law enforcement. Your info could be helpful to Doug Ritter and Knife Rights if they come to NM at some point to lobby for changes in the law. Always vital when it comes to educating legislators.
     
  10. NMpops

    NMpops

    643
    Aug 9, 2010
    New Mexico is a little old fashioned and change comes slowly but it would be nice to see Knife Rights set up shop there. I had a sergeant once that "New Mexico is the place to be when the world ends, they're always 20 years behind the times"
     
    zzyzzogeton likes this.
  11. flphotog

    flphotog

    311
    Jul 10, 2014
    The problem with AKTI is that these "inaccuracies" can cause people real trouble and they refuse to even listen when they are brought to their attention, that's my problem with them.
    If you want to get accurate or even reasonably accurate info go directly to the state web sites or even knife up, they are very good.
     

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