Timberline K. Worden, Pocket Hobbit

Joined
Dec 9, 2000
Messages
735
I got both of these knives this weekend and I wanted to post my impresions of each. They sort of go together since they're both big, heavy, purely tactical weapons. I'll list a few areas and give my impressions of each in that area:

Appearance:
Worden- This knife is big. Seeing a picture or knowing the measurements can't prepare you for seeing or holding it. It's huge. It has an elegant streamlined apperance, my only apperance related complaint is the large lettering on the blade, this is a pet-peave of mine. The finish of the blade itself is beautifull, and it looks like alot more than a 45 dollar knife. It also looks and feels very heavy and solid in the hand.
Pocket hobbit- This is probably the ugliest knife I've ever seen. It does look nice in a solid, no nonsense, fucntional sort of way. It looks like it wants to be held, and it looks like a knife you wouldn't want to be on the business end of, mine has a black-T blade, which makes the knife even more sinister.

Ergonomics:
Worden- The shape of this handle, and the subhilt-esque projection, make the grip on the open knife great. It feels like a knife you can stab confidently with, and your hand isn't going anywhere. It seemed to fit my hand prefectly, and the pocket clip carry works well. The finish on the handle is kind of smooth, so drawing this knife while your hands are wet can be difficult, but once it's open, it's not going anywhere. The thumbstud is in just the right place, and opens the blade as easily as one half it's size, the liner lock has filework on it, which make it easy to close, but don't make it any easier to accidently disengage, which is a good thing. Inertial openings take some serious force with this knife. The handle seems to favor sabre grip.
Pocket hobit- This knife will stay in your hand. The finger grooves ensure that. The rolling lock also gives me more confidence to use this knife harder than the worden if I had to. The belt sheath takes some getting used to, but the prefered opening method is to snap the knife out of the belt sheath and open into reverse grip in one snaping movement. I can do this about 2 times out of 10, after one day of practice, but can snap it open after drawing it, easily, 99 percent of the time, so this knife is at least as fast as a liner lock in pocket carry. The scales on this knife are textured, so it's easy to draw and manipulate. The lock is easy to operate. The thumbstud sucks, but keep in mind that's a secondary opening method. This knife is shorter and a bit lighter, I think than the worden. This knife was designed for reverse grip, but feels fine in sabre as well.

Lock:
Worden- Good old fashioned liner lock. I haven't done a spine wack, but people say that it's not the best liner lock. One thread mentions using 100 grit sandpaper to rough-up the lock surfaces, I will do this when I get a chance. But in any event, I am warry of liner locks, and would never think about back cutting with this knife. But for a 45 dollar knife, there is NO blade play, and the ergonomics are the best of any liner lock I've ever used, very smooth, but not too easy to get started. It will not open in your pocket.
Pocket Hobbit- This was the knife that the rolling lock was designed for. Though I haven't done any real testing on this lock, I trust it. It seems imposible to release accidently. And you KNOW when it's open, it sounds like a pump action shot gun being cocked.

Blade:
Worden- I like this blade. About 4 inches, seems equaly suited to slashing and stabing. I consider AUS-8 and adequate steel. On a 45 dollar knife, I'd expect AUS-6 (ala CRKT KFF) so this is a bargin. The edge came hair-scraping sharp.
Pocket Hobbit- This is NOT a utility blade. It is designed to cut, stab, and trap. The things on the back (I won't call them serations since there isn't a back edge, and calling them that might make this sound like a double edged knife) facilitate Palisut-type movements, traping, and other nasty martial artsy things. I'm slighty concerned about the knife getting hooked in a targets clothing on these. I've never stabed anyone, so I don't know... The balde is about 3 1/4 inches, and is made of tried and true, ATS-34. I'd expect nothing less, and maybe something slightly more (440 V, maybe, but I don't want to start a steel debate).

In love both of these knives, and if anyone has a question about either, I'll answer to the best of my ability...



------------------
William Callahan

"I can picture in my mind a world without war, a world without
hate. And I can picture us attacking that world, because they'd
never expect it."
-Jack Handey

I'm one of those wierdos who likes Zytel.
 
Joined
Dec 9, 2000
Messages
735
A couple complaints after carrying both for a few days.
The Worden Tactical folder: I carry thing in my right pocket, the only complaint I have is that the ambidexterous thumb stud catches on the edge of my pocket. I have to draw with a twist to get it out fast. If it was just a right handed knife, it wouldn't be a problem.
Hobbit: This thing hurts to carry, the but is sharp and digs into my side. It will be easier in the winter, when I'm wearing layers.

I still love them both, just wanted to add that info.

------------------
William Callahan

"I can picture in my mind a world without war, a world without
hate. And I can picture us attacking that world, because they'd
never expect it."
-Jack Handey

I'm one of those wierdos who likes Zytel.
 
Top