TOPS 1095 High Carbon Alloy Blades

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boogeyman

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hardened to RC 58 how much stain/corrosion resistance could I expect to get out of this metal compared to 440a ?

the knife I'm looking at is a TOPS that would be used for woods type activities. the occassional crossing of a river on horseback isn't uncommon on my trips and am wondering just how much corrosion resistance i'll need. Truthfully, I just got into knives and most of my old ones are stained in one way or another. A little help on what I need would be great. I just hope I can find what I need from TOPS because I find their designs the most appealing in both style and function.
 
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Well, no 1095 high carbon blade, even a high dollar one, is going to have the rust resistance of even a 10.00 440A stainless blade. Most TOPS knives do have a blade coating that will help, and the use of Kydex sheaths does also. But any 1095 blade is going to require wiping down with oil after much use to prevent rust, and some staining si going to occur while cutting certain things that can't really be prevented.
 
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Why dont you get one of there knives made in CPM154 ?
The BEST with a hunterspoint is a dand fine knife and way better then the carbon ones IMO.

Cheers,

André

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boogeyman

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I should've mentioned I was looking at the UTE #01. There are other people that go on the trip with knives about the size of the best. I'm really looking for a general utility fixed blade. If I got the UTE #01 would some marine tuf-cloth help? any reccomendations on a knife that size with better steel?
 
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I'm sure glad YOU are lugging that Spas12 around the woods and not me...LOL! Back in the late 80's, a Survivalist wanna-be friend of mine had one. I thought it was heavy and handled like a log. I will stick to my little 28 gauge O/U Mossberg. Not a top dollar gun, but fine for lugging around the woods when I'm looking for Grouse and small game.
 
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if you're just crossing ocasional freshwter river then I wouldnt worry about 1095, just wipe down and you're good to go. regular tuff cloth should be good, marine better if you don't mind the extra residue.
 

Danbo

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They need to make that Moccasin Ranger in CPM3V.
 

rowdy27

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Hell, even 440C would be cool.
Hey Danbo, I have the same handle as you for about 6 years now..on the flyfishing sites.
 
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There are two general categories of steel that knife blades are made of- Carbon Steel and Stainless steel. Both of these categories of steel are widely used today due to their unique characteristics. Generally, carbon steel can hold a better edge than stainless steel, but stainless steel has better corrosion resistant properties. There is a tradeoff between corrosion resistance and edge retention.Carbon Steel is made of iron and a very small amount of carbon. Carbon steel is categorized into four classifications- low carbon (or mild) steel, medium carbon steel, high carbon steel and very high carbon steel. Low carbon steel contains .05% to .3% carbon. Medium Steel contains .3% to .5% carbon, high carbon steel contains .5% to .95% carbon, and very high carbon steel contains .96% to 2.1% carbon. High carbon steels are the most widely used carbon steel for making blades, because once heat treated, they can maintain a good balance between high toughness and the ability to harden.
 
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There are two general categories of steel that knife blades are made of- Carbon Steel and Stainless steel. Both of these categories of steel are widely used today due to their unique characteristics. Generally, carbon steel can hold a better edge than stainless steel, but stainless steel has better corrosion resistant properties. There is a tradeoff between corrosion resistance and edge retention.Carbon Steel is made of iron and a very small amount of carbon. Carbon steel is categorized into four classifications- low carbon (or mild) steel, medium carbon steel, high carbon steel and very high carbon steel. Low carbon steel contains .05% to .3% carbon. Medium Steel contains .3% to .5% carbon, high carbon steel contains .5% to .95% carbon, and very high carbon steel contains .96% to 2.1% carbon. High carbon steels are the most widely used carbon steel for making blades, because once heat treated, they can maintain a good balance between high toughness and the ability to harden.
 
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Wow half the guys posting in this thread have been banned.
I dont think they will hear your advice.
 
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I own a Mini-Skandi Survival from TOPS, which is made from the same steel as the one OP questioned about (1095 RC 65-68). I wore mine one Summer without applying any rust solution, and it was just fine. Infact, the only minor problem I had was due to the Stainless Ball Chain it came with (its a neck knife) because it was irritating the back of my neck (solved the problem by replacing it with 550 cord). Just as many have stated, as long as you apply some rust prevention solution from time to time, the blade will last you long time at a optimal functioning level. Due to the fact that it is a neck knife, I wear it underneath my shirt. The sheath has a little opening near the area where the tip of the blade sits once sheathed, and I found little tint spot marks on the tip of the blade (during the summer period where no rust prevention solution was used), but as you can see in the picture, it was solved after I applied some rust prevention solution.
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hardened to RC 58 how much stain/corrosion resistance could I expect to get out of this metal compared to 440a ?

the knife I'm looking at is a TOPS that would be used for woods type activities. the occassional crossing of a river on horseback isn't uncommon on my trips and am wondering just how much corrosion resistance i'll need. Truthfully, I just got into knives and most of my old ones are stained in one way or another. A little help on what I need would be great. I just hope I can find what I need from TOPS because I find their designs the most appealing in both style and function.

Staining not bad... Rusting bad.
 
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There are two general categories of steel that knife blades are made of- Carbon Steel and Stainless steel. Both of these categories of steel are widely used today due to their unique characteristics. Generally, carbon steel can hold a better edge than stainless steel, but stainless steel has better corrosion resistant properties. There is a tradeoff between corrosion resistance and edge retention.Carbon Steel is made of iron and a very small amount of carbon. Carbon steel is categorized into four classifications- low carbon (or mild) steel, medium carbon steel, high carbon steel and very high carbon steel. Low carbon steel contains .05% to .3% carbon. Medium Steel contains .3% to .5% carbon, high carbon steel contains .5% to .95% carbon, and very high carbon steel contains .96% to 2.1% carbon. High carbon steels are the most widely used carbon steel for making blades, because once heat treated, they can maintain a good balance between high toughness and the ability to harden.

You might want to do some research.
 
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