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Vaughan 1940 catalog

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Steve Tall, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    Another old catalog posted to archive.org (thanks to Mark Stansbury):

    https://archive.org/stream/VaughanFineTools1940/Vaughan Fine Tools 1940#page/n5/mode/2up

    Interesting that the Vaughan axes were made by electrically welding a "tool steel blade" to a poll/eye made of lower-grade steel. The single-bit axes started out as two pieces, and the double-bit axes were four pieces, before the welding. (see catalog page 5, archive page reference 7/32)

    The Vaughan "Sub-Zero" Axe has "no high-carbon steel in the eye to crystallize when frozen." It gets a special Double Heat Treatment after welding, and is said to be suitable for chopping at temperatures down to 50 degrees below zero (see catalog page 6, archive page reference 8/32).

    Vaughan had a "Tropical Hardwood Axe" having an "extra-thin" (with high-centerline) "Chip Clearance Blade" (see catalog page 7, archive page reference 9/32).

    More axes are on catalog pages 8 and 9 (archive page references 10/32 and 11/32). Some Vaughan hatchets appear later in the catalog.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2017
  2. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    Yankee Josh, garry3, halfaxe and 2 others like this.
  3. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    this looks complicated. i guess thats the easy way to mass produce an inserted bit head
     
  4. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    That sub zero Michigan , and the tropical hardwoods axe sure look nice and I'd love to see an actual example if anyone here ever finds one.

    Its pretty cool to know that the 999 rip caw has been around since at least the 40's and still going strong as basically the best hickory handled rip claw ever.
    I've always loved Vaughan & Bushnell, so thanks for sharing this:thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017
    Yankee Josh and Square_peg like this.
  5. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    640
    Dec 20, 2015
    Thank you Steve.This explains a lot.
    More and more,i think,we may infer that the contrasting,darker "temper line" is actually a weld boundary.
    Be it an axe-blade,or a hammer face and claw.
    And it stands to reason(or at the very least i'm,personally, consistently failing to discover a metallurgical reason for the HT'd portion to become darker in appearance).
     
    Square_peg likes this.
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    But then how do we account for that same line showing up in Plumb monosteel axes?
     
  7. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
  8. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    640
    Dec 20, 2015
    Steve,thanks again,that's a very good point.
    I'm afraid that i must say "i dunno...",(and same to what Square-peg says above...).
    I'm not sure if tempered martensite(or whatever structure the alloy was heat-treated to)would oxidise Visibly differently,And,if so,that it'd turn a darker color.
    The photo in that thread you posted a link to is kinda unique...Don Hanson,one of the folks that seemed to think that it was right and proper,is ultra-experienced,knowledgeble smith,i'd never doubt his opinion.
    However,it's actually one of Don's specialties,the visible so-called "hamon" a Japanese term for the observable Ht effect.It is Anything but easy to achieve,even with more sophisticated etching processes.
    And i believe,in MOST cases,the hardened part is Lighter in color....
    (metallurgy tends to be that way,never entirely black and white...)

    (i do apologise for diluting this thread ).
     
    300Six likes this.
  9. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Here's a Plumb flooring hatchet with temper lines on the bit and poll.

    [​IMG]

    Also note that the temper line is deepest where there is the least mass behind it at the nail notch.

    FWIW, I think it CAN be a weld line but isn't necessarily.
     
  10. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    And I still wonder why temper lines are sometimes curved and sometimes straight. The curved ones are always deepest at the edges and never in the center.
     
    junkenstien likes this.
  11. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    [​IMG]
    1950's Craftsman hammertooth made by Vaughan.
    I've got a modern Vaughan 999 that also has a darker striking head and claws, but it's got dried blo all over it and wouldn't show up well in a picture.
     
    garry3, FortyTwoBlades and Square_peg like this.
  12. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    640
    Dec 20, 2015
    Likewise,i wonder about that too...Possibly,when differentially HT'd,the edges will be hotter then the center-they're thinner(in convex-bladed american axes),and have more areas exposed to heat.
    Indeed,it would take some doing to heat so as to form a straight line(thus this electric trick of Vaughn's is so revelatory).
    And so it Would form just the curvature we see often...However,again,i know not what form of internal structure would appear so visibly when etched....:(
     
  13. junkenstien

    junkenstien

    435
    Feb 15, 2017
    Super steel was the same price,does that mean same quality ?Got a supersteel Michigan, hard to imagine they made a better one.
     
  14. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    On page twelve the Vaughan-Super Vanadium hammer comes with a wax hole in the end of the handle. I knew this was a thing for some old guys that filled their handles with oil but had no idea that a manufacturer actually predrilled it.
    So is this hole for filling with oil or just a handy place to keep some wax on hand? Or both?
     
  15. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    I don't know about the quality differences, but the dealer cost for the Supersteel axes was 25% less than the Sub-Zero, after the discount mentioned on page 1:

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    "For waxing nails to be driven into hardwood."

    [​IMG]
    from 1917 ad
     
  17. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Just the answer I was looking for.
    Thanks Steve!
     
  18. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I used to keep a bit of candle wax in my nail bags for just this purpose. Helpful if you had to drive a nail right next to a knot.
     
  19. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    There was a contractor I worked for in the late 1980's who told me a story about this. He used to work for his father, a contractor before him. There was a woman on the crew who was an excellent carpenter in her own right and went on to become a successful contractor. One of the guys on the crew used to like to tease her about 'hammering like a girl'. So she challenged him to a contest to see who could nail off the studs in a wall fastest, one contestant working the top plate, the other the bottom plate. It was close but she beat him and he had to eat crow. Later she confessed to my old boss that she had waxed every nail in her bag. They were framing with 16 penny galvies.
     
    Jasper33, FortyTwoBlades and 300Six like this.
  20. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    I would use bees wax that I kept warm in my pocket mostly for wood screws. Back in the yankee days..
     
    Square_peg likes this.

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