Welding a Blade

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by celluloidheros, Oct 24, 2020.

  1. celluloidheros

    celluloidheros

    72
    Dec 31, 2008
    Hello, I have never tried to weld an old carbon steel blade but I know it's possible. A friend of mine has used silver solder and it works well but is visible. I have seen TIG welders but don't know anyone who is an expert. Can anyone share advice on how to weld a carbon steel blade to a tang. What is the best type of welder to use and what are the best techniques. Thanks, Don C.
     
  2. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    What you are describing is generally considered counterfeiting.
     
  3. Randydb

    Randydb Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 27, 2014
    I'm lost here. I imagined that some blade has broken off the tang and they want to reweld it....what am I missing?
     
    Ken H> and HSC /// like this.
  4. neo71665

    neo71665

    171
    Feb 18, 2020
    1. Phone book
    2. look up welding shops
    3. call

    I doubt you will find anybody that will stand behind welding a blade back together for anything but a wall hanger
     
  5. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    Generally, blade welding is done to replace a worn out/broken blade onto a tang that has a valuable stamp.
    Otherwise, you could just make a new blade.
     
  6. Rhinoknives1

    Rhinoknives1 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 1, 2013
    What Bill has said!^^^ Throw it in the trash & make another or buy another blade to be HTed! Nothing to be gained by welding it!
     
  7. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Fellows, lets give the chap a chance to explain what he is trying to do.

    celluloidheros - post a photo of the project and what you are trying to do. As said, it is unlikely that the knife will be usable again, but if it is just something to display, it might be possible.
     
    Ken H>, weo and HSC /// like this.
  8. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    Sure- but I can think of no other reason than I stated above.
     
  9. celluloidheros

    celluloidheros

    72
    Dec 31, 2008
    Hello, This is a general question. I want to learn how to do it myself. These are on antique knives with rare stamps where the blade is broken at the tang. finding a replacement blade might be difficult or impossible. I'm interested in the art and skill of doing it to bring an old knife back to life. I'm not interested in counterfeiting knives. More interesting in restoring old knives.
     
  10. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    As I said, that's counterfeiting-even if you don't look at it as such.
     
    Grayzer86, Bigfattyt and JamesBro like this.
  11. Randydb

    Randydb Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 27, 2014
    Impressive, you called it Bill.
     
    Grayzer86 and Bigfattyt like this.
  12. HSC ///

    HSC ///

    Nov 7, 2012
    Why is that counterfeiting? Something counterfeit is based in deception and fraud. Sounds like he wants to do a repair for something that is meaningful to him.

    why are we assuming that he wants to sell it deceptively?
     
    Storm W likes this.
  13. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    There may be a language issue with wording.
    I am trying to determine if he wants to save the blade by attaching a new tang ( which is done all the time), or save a tang with marks ( mostly Japanese Mei) and put on a new blade. I agree with Bill that the latter would be fraudulent.
    If Celluloidheros would post a photo or drawing it would clear things up.

    Just a note:
    Ancient and rare broken Japanese blades with nakago marks are kept just as they are and displayed. The missing blade is not ruinous, but replacing it would be sacrilege as well as destroy all value.
     
  14. JamesBro

    JamesBro Gold Member Gold Member

    95
    Aug 21, 2012
     
  15. JamesBro

    JamesBro Gold Member Gold Member

    95
    Aug 21, 2012
    If you create a fake item, as in the stamp no longer represents the finished knife or painting...whatever, your intentions don't matter.
    Simple solution, done all the time is grind or x out the stamp.
     
  16. Mike Fennessy

    Mike Fennessy

    326
    Dec 19, 2005
    I don't in any way understand what is controversial about this. Here are over 20 examples of this same question here on bladeforums:
    weld tang bladeforums site:www.bladeforums.com
    Maybe I'm missing something..

    edit... also, the old links above will probably answer your question, OP.
     
  17. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 6, 2000
    Let's say you have a very rare Case (Remington, Schrade, etc.) knife, except the blade is seriously worn down.
    Why, you get Bubba the welder to weld a new blade onto the tang. Presto! With a little grinding and polishing you have a new, rare knife with a full blade!
    Except it isn't.
    Even if you are a deacon in your church and are as honest as the day is long, once that knife leaves your hands most people can't tell it's been welded.
    The OP has asked many questions over the years about repairing knives. He recently asked questions about how to sell knives. Whether his intent is to sell a welded blade has malice or not, the knife is counterfeit.
     
    Grayzer86, scarysamcary and Natlek like this.
  18. weo

    weo KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Sep 21, 2014
    I think Bill sums up the problem the best here.
    The problem might not be with your motives. The problem is that once it's out of your hands, you have no control over what happens with the knife. If you do a great job restoring it, the next person could try to sell it as an original, which would be fraudulent. And unfortunately, you would be complicit in that fraud unless you do something to make it obvious that the original has been modified.
     
  19. HSC ///

    HSC ///

    Nov 7, 2012
    Thanks for the added explanation. I guess I didn’t really see the OP question that way...but I get what you are saying
     
  20. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Bill's example seems to be about a folder with a broken blade. I can see his argument there. I was thinking about a fixed blade. I see that the OP is a folder guy, now.

    Many old folding knives have the blade replaced. I am sure Bill has replaced many a blade for someone with a favorite old folder.

    That aside, I can't see how the OP expects to weld a blade to the broken tang and get a usable or even acceptable looking blade. It would be far simpler to make a new blade or reshape one from an old knife. Restoration and repair usually does not lower the value much or any at all.

    I am sure Bill has similar stories, but here is one of mine:
    I restored an antique English handmade 1870's gentleman's sportsman folder with ten blades and other accessories. It even had a watch winding key. I picked the knife up for $45 is terrible condition. I replaced the age destroyed ivory scales and re-installed the original escutcheon plate. The scissors were missing the spring and bent, to which I straightened and fitted a new spring. Two blades were broken off at the tang - one small and one large. Luckily, neither were the ones marked with the maker's name. I made a new blade for both by re-grinding old blades I stripped out of my junk-box folders ( removing any old maker's mark). When done the knife was in really nice looking restored shape. It took several years of now-and-then working on it. It won best antique knife at a show and I sold it for $750 to a collector. He fully knew it was restored, and appreciated that.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2020
    Storm W and razor-edge-knives like this.

Share This Page