Western style Bowie and villager Khukuri passed the field test

Discussion in 'Himalayan Imports' started by Yangdu, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. Yangdu

    Yangdu [email protected] Himalayan Imports-Owner Moderator

    Apr 5, 2005
    Villager fit and finish Western style Bowie by Ram Kumar.

    Overall length --12 1/4''
    Weight --17 oz
    Spine thickness --1/4''
    Steel guard
    Satisal wood chiruwa style handle with brass and copper combo pins
    Leather sheath
    Great chopper at $125.
    For field test video visit Himalayan Imports Facebook

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    17 inch 28 ounce villager fit and finish Khukuri by Ram Kumar. Nice and sharp blade! Chiruwa style satisal wood handle with brass pins. Traditional leather sheath. Add to your Ram Kumar Khukuri collection at $135. *SOLD* For field test video visit Himalayan Imports Facebook
    Thank you for the donation for kamis
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Email to [email protected] to order one or both
    First come first served
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  2. XelaXela

    XelaXela

    173
    Feb 22, 2010
    yikes! that villager went fast :) congrats!
     
    EricTheRedBeard likes this.
  3. EricTheRedBeard

    EricTheRedBeard Basic Member Basic Member

    554
    May 17, 2018
    Sharks man. That was a nice one. I'm sure it will make some dadgum sneaky shark very happy. :)
     
    XelaXela likes this.
  4. davidf99

    davidf99 Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Sep 27, 2011
    That villager khukuri has a nice blade shape and a beautifully contoured handle. The overall shape reminds me of the vintage Longleaf models from the Nepal armory, except that the handle is larger for western-type hands. Nice length and weight, too. I would have gone for this one, but came late to the party.
     
    XelaXela and EricTheRedBeard like this.
  5. Bawanna

    Bawanna Moderator Moderator

    Dec 19, 2012
    It does indeed resemble a long leaf very much. That was a dandy. Enjoy it whoever you are.
     
  6. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 26, 2010
    Yep! Nice shape alright! I kinda like the burl duck too!
     
    EricTheRedBeard likes this.
  7. EricTheRedBeard

    EricTheRedBeard Basic Member Basic Member

    554
    May 17, 2018
    Haha! I was staring at that beautiful khuk. I didn't even notice the burl duck!
     
  8. Bandages

    Bandages

    8
    Jun 7, 2020
    For the past couple months I've been trying to tackle an absolutely horrendous trumpet vine infestation with various tramontinas, parangs, what have you. These toxic things vary from thin leafy stalks to thick gnarled trunks inches across that I've actually mistook for other trees when trying to remove them, and decided I needed something a little more capable.
    My first experience with a kukri-like object was a lion-pommel dui chirra that my father had bought for me from a museum replicas or some such affiliated mailorder catalogue decades ago, that I used to whack apart pepper trees in the yard with as a kid. Beloved nostalgia that it was, I now have learned that my long lost knife was a dull, made in India, tourist quality blade and not indicative of a genuine khukuri experience. After looking over many videos and blogs all roads seemed to lead to a few nepalese manufacturers with HI always in the forefront of recommendations, although the backlog on commissions for everyone seems involve months and months of waiting. I had been lurking this forum for other knives for a good half year before learning HI had a subforum, and was overjoyed to find out that you could, if time and chance were fortuitous, immediately purchase a blade directly from forum posts.
    I was lucky enough to snag a blem 15 inch BAS and was surprised not just by the quality of the blade, but the little details of craftsmanship, the delicate bronze inlays in the spine, etc. I had read some detractors complaining about HI blades being on the heavier side but this was so light, while being SHARP! It was as if it were tailor made for destroying these vines! Witnessing the synergy of the form and function of this design in motion on living wood for the first time is hard to describe, other than "Wow that was easy." Suffice to say I should have invested in one long beforehand. Sadly, after just a day of use I had noticed that the buttcap had come loose. Maybe it was from hammering too hard on heavier branches than I should have or perhaps, despite oiling, from wood shrinkage from being in a dry desert environment. It didn't seem to have any effect on the handle or the blade though, and the BAS still works above and beyond my expectations just fine, albeit now with a jingling rattle. But I wondered whether I should have gotten a full tang or something with maybe a little more heft for tougher things. Having read multiple posts here extolling the virtues of the almighty CAK I learned of chiruwas.
    So when this posting appeared right as I absently looked at the forum I must apologize, I pounced on it immediately. It just ticks all the boxes I was looking for and in person it does not disappoint one bit! It fits the hand like a glove and the weight distribution is nothing short of perfection. It's sharp enough to lop off thin branches in the air yet can devastate thick ones on a stump as well as my TOPS El Chete, yet without the arm fatigue that that chopper gives me. It doesn't hurt that this beautiful curve is easy to look at. I think I have found my spirit khukuri.
    Thank you to Auntie Yangdu and Ram Kumar for putting this in my hands. You have a fan for life. And thank you to the all the wonderful forum posters sharing their experiences, even if it somethings seems like an idle comment such things build up the knowledge base for others like me.
     
    EricTheRedBeard likes this.
  9. EricTheRedBeard

    EricTheRedBeard Basic Member Basic Member

    554
    May 17, 2018
    I know what you mean about the synergy. It is something we can talk about all day long, but it will never be understood until it is experienced. Some blades actually feel like an extension of your own body. I refer to these as magical. Most of my magic blades were made by Ram Kumar. Sounds like this one found its way to its rightful home.

    Regarding your BAS, some people would recomend peening the tang to tighten up the pommel but personally, I would tape off the handle and brass butt cap and then fill the gap with epoxy if the gap is bigger or super glue if it is very small. I have had a lot of luck with both. This will probably take about 5-10 minutes and might solve the problem. Welcome to the brotherhood of the bent blade.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2020
  10. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 26, 2010
    Welcome to the forum Bandages! Glad you found the right Khuk. Dont be a stranger here. We kindly abuse each other quite frequently here.
    like Eric said but i might add if you epoxy it then peen the end while the epoxy is still slightly soft (30 minutes later for example) and that will give you a better fit when it does cure completely.
     
    EricTheRedBeard likes this.

Share This Page