What about the Chinese War Sword or Broad Sword??

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Dec 2, 2004
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You always find a lot of info about that samurai sword, but really nothing about the chinese swords. I saw on CS website the Chinese War Sword and it seems impressive and I WANT IT!!!!!!! Anyway, I was wondering where would I be able to fine more about these swords such as the history and how they are made????

Thanks,
Lee
 
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Thanks for the info...I was wondering if you seen the Chinese War Sword or the Da Dao that Cold Steel offers. I dont see much on that type of sword at all. It looks like it could really kick some @$$ if it needed to, plus for being a bit heavier than the other swords it seems to be able to flow pretty fluid like the lighter swords, I may be wrong though.

Lee
 
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Haven't seen the on you're talking about but this dadao would look pretty cool in a Chinese pirate movie http://chinese-weapons.gungfu.com/

I saw a really cool sword once on some documentary about China.... it had a couple of slots in it with little captive metal balls that could roll back and forth inside the slot/s No idea what it was called though and haven't seen on on the net.
 
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flbache said:
...I was wondering if you seen the Chinese War Sword or the Da Dao that Cold Steel offers. I dont see much on that type of sword at all. It looks like it could really kick some @$$ if it needed to, plus for being a bit heavier than the other swords it seems to be able to flow pretty fluid like the lighter swords, I may be wrong though.
I received a War Sword a few years ago as a gift, and have been very happy with it. It's reasonably sharp--not a whole lot, but enough to do what a two-handed broadsword was meant to do.

It does have a comparatively heavy handle, so you'll get a good forearm workout with it; however, its very nature as a two-handed weapon allows it to flow pretty well. If you're looking for a good-looking weapon, the War Sword isn't it...of course, to a lot of people (myself included), this is a good-looking weapon.

Off-hand, if you're looking to really really punish this weapon, I wouldn't put too much faith in it... given its price, it's probably not going to last long or hold up under extremely heavy use. But it will surprise you with what it can do.
 
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I like the look because it looks as if it can take a beating and still keep on whooping butt. I dont care about looks, just what it can do. I was thinking about getting mine from CS, because they use carbon steel and it is considered to be a "working" sword, not a show piece. That is what I like!!!!! I dont know that I am gong to use it for, but I am sure that I can think of something. God help if anyone comes in my house after getting it...hahahahah
 
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what are the rings on some of the weapons used for???? I noticed on some swords there are rings near the spine of the blade, even on some of the pole arms...

lee
 
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Wasn't one of the characters in the "Arthur" flick carrying a pair of Chinese 16th or 17th Century warswords over his back?
 
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The large broad bladed Chinese war sword with the ring pommel was frequently carried over the back and drawn over the shoulder. It was used a good bit during the Warlord Era of the 1920s as a beheading sword and it was easier to draw if you grabbed the ring and pulled. For other swords with ring pommels, I suspect that ther were other reasons, as, for instance, the case of the Irish ring swords and the Roman and Sarmatian ring pommel shortswords of the late 2nd Century CE.

Rings not on the pommel but below the guard on a sword were usually put there to allow a finger to be wrapped around the guard for better control of the sword and to still have some protection. This eventually grew into the elaborate rings and branches of the swept-hilt rapier or the counter-guard on the Papenheimer rapier. Perhaps the Chinese had a similar use for them.
 
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FullerH said:
Rings not on the pommel but below the guard on a sword were usually put there to allow a finger to be wrapped around the guard for better control of the sword and to still have some protection. This eventually grew into the elaborate rings and branches of the swept-hilt rapier or the counter-guard on the Papenheimer rapier. Perhaps the Chinese had a similar use for them.
FullerH is correct--this started as a useful feature for certain blades, but like fins on a Cadillac, grew out of all sense of proportion. There are Chinese long blades that have dozens of rings up the back of the blade. Purpose? None--other than many people like the look, and they glittered and jingled when the weapon was spun or whirled. Rings like this have found their way onto a bunch of Chinese weapons, including many without blades. Basically it's all ornamentation as well, but did originate with a specific purpose in mind: control.
 
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Actually I think that the guy you talking about who was carrying a chinese sword was Mongol. Atleast his armor appeared to be Mongol, but who knows. His bow even looked Asian in appearance such as from China. I dont know. I watched it twice already looking for different things. Did Lancelot use 2 Roman swords, that is what they looked like to me. I actually liked the movie King Arthur a lot, especially since it didnt have all of that "fantasy" crap in it.

Lee
 
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