What Do We Know About 1050 Carbon Steel?

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How well does it hold an edge? How strong is the material? Is it very resistant to corrosion? etc........

Thanks!
 

stjames

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1050 Carbon Steel once pitched two No-Hitters back-to-back against the New York Yankees! 1050 Carbon Steel is wanted in four States in the South-West for practicing Dentistry without a licence. It used to baby-sit Jim Morrison was he was a child, and is given a special thank you in the liner notes of Strange Days. 1050 Carbon Steel ghost-wrote Brave New World, and coined the phrase "Been there, Done that." 1050 Carbon Steel single-handedly foiled a plot to assasinate President Bush during the Gulf War, and once grew an extra kidney to donate to Bob Hope. It mixed the first three Beatles albums, and invented the InterNet!

1050 Carbon Steel is having my baby, and I want the world to know it!
 
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Not a very good steel really. Poor edge holding and no Chrome so poor rust resistance.

A good steel for a sword at a low Rc.

Very much below par for a knife steel.

Only my opinion, but I think you will find we steel snobs like 154CM and upwards as knife steel!

W.A.

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Bimmer; please look up and post the elemental composition of 1050 steel.

Then explain why you thought an alloy with no Cr in it all would be corrosion resistant.

Walt
 
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Walt Welch:
Bimmer; please look up and post the elemental composition of 1050 steel.

Then explain why you thought an alloy with no Cr in it all would be corrosion resistant.

Walt
</font>

"Well let me see. I've got my periodic table of elements right here in front of me..........."

 
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1050.....
50 points of carbon (a point is expressed as .01%), manganese, and iron.
Little corrosion resistance. Excellent steel when forged for impact type impelments such as hatchets, hawks, and large camp type knives.
When properly heat treated it will achieve Rc hardnes levels in the mid to high 50s.
A very good material choice to utilize for "clay" hardening, as it will produce an exceptional hamon.
As with all other steels, it has it's applications. It's a matter of choosing the correct material for the given implement/task.

[This message has been edited by Ed Caffrey (edited 02-13-2001).]
 

dogboye

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Ed Caffrey:
1050.....
50 points of carbon (a point is expressed as .01%), manganese, and iron.....
When properly heat treated it will achieve Rc hardnes levels in the mid to high 50s.
A very good material choice to utilize for "clay" hardening, as it will produce an exceptional hamon.
</font>

So it's crap but it looks good in a clay tempered blade, a la Steve Corkum?

Hmmmm...
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iktomi
 

It's a first choice for cutting a throat, very sharp, but do not use it on hard stuff.
Furthermore: after cutting said throat, clean it quickly, unless it will discolor.
Happy sharpening
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Ted
 
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It is basically plain carbon steel with 0.5% carbon. It is intended to be tough rather than exceptionally hard. I think it was originally called "improved plow blade steel". Large knives are likelier to be made of 1075 (.75% carbon) and hunting knives out of 1084 or 1095. It would be easy to sharpen, but would be softer than most alloys. It would rust easily.
 
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Bimmer1; you should be able to research the elemental composition of any alloy. Here are some places to start:

Tery Primo's site: HERE

A G Russell's site HERE

Spyderco's site HERE

The Specialty Steel site, which explains about stainless steels, and gives their elemental composition. HERE

Principal metals site, which has thousands of alloys HERE

Also, you should have gone to the front page of BFC, and followed the 'knowledge base', and read Joe Talmadge's excellent FAQs about steel HERE

Joe also gives a number of sites other than the ones I have given above, so you should be able to find about any alloy, foreign or domestic. Further, Joe's FAQs and Terry Primo's site address the effect that the alloying elements have on steel.

Thus, you should really have been able to do what I asked. You are certainly able to do so now, and you will find that the more you know about a subject before you ask about a question, the more you will learn.

Walt
 
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Walt Welch:
Bimmer1; you should be able to research the elemental composition of any alloy. Here are some places to start:

Tery Primo's site: HERE

A G Russell's site HERE

Spyderco's site HERE

The Specialty Steel site, which explains about stainless steels, and gives their elemental composition. HERE

Principal metals site, which has thousands of alloys HERE

Also, you should have gone to the front page of BFC, and followed the 'knowledge base', and read Joe Talmadge's excellent FAQs about steel HERE

Joe also gives a number of sites other than the ones I have given above, so you should be able to find about any alloy, foreign or domestic. Further, Joe's FAQs and Terry Primo's site address the effect that the alloying elements have on steel.

Thus, you should really have been able to do what I asked. You are certainly able to do so now, and you will find that the more you know about a subject before you ask about a question, the more you will learn.

Walt
</font>

"It seems to me that if I knew the answer to my question before the question entered into my mind then I would have never thought to ask the question in the first place. He that does not ask may never find out. After six years of college I am fully aware of the proper principles of study. Steelworking and metal is not my area of expertise. It may be your area of knowledge, but not mine. I'm just a curious bladeforums user looking for a straight answer. It seems that we must aimlessly explore the minds of strangers to obtain this answer. Besides, with a man of your high intellect one shouldn't waste many hours studying. I can come out here and tap into your almighty source of knowledge! We should avoid using the forums and send all questions directly to you from this day on." Thanks for your help.

 
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Walt Welch:
Bimmer1; another useful feature is the 'search' button, located below and to the right of the 'post reply' button.

Doing a search on '1050' would have yielded you this thread: http://www.bladeforums.com/ubb/Forum64/HTML/002093.html

A recent one, which discusses the corrosion properties of 1050, and also gives its' elemental composition.

Hope this helps, Walt
</font>

"Thanks Walt. This reply had a somewhat nicer tone. Don't forget many of us are still learning how to use the bladeforums. Maybe you could write a book, "Bladeforums for Dummies." I would be glad to write the "Forward."

 
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The 'Blade Forums for Dummies' is basically already written. It is called the FAQs (which I am beginning to believe stands for 'Frequently Avoided Questions.')

You need not bother to write the forward. Just forward people there.

After four years of college, two of pharmacy school, and three of medical school, I have learned that if you research and learn about a subject before you ask a question, you will usually learn a lot more. That is what happened with me here during the past four years. I researched to find answers and then posted the answers, helping people learn, and learning myself. Fewer than 2% of my posts have been new topics; most are answers to other people's posted threads.

Walt
 
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