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What Do You Call This Style Of Knife?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Uath, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. Uath

    Uath

    594
    Oct 25, 2003
    I've got several knives of this type. They're short, usually curved, with a short rounded handle, and a finger hole. This is a TOPS Cal Cutta. Mine doesn't quite look like this, but TOPS knives are different one from the other.

    [​IMG]

    My son and i have always called them "Pan" knives, after the goat god. Don't ask me why. I have a single-edged damascus one with a slightly less than 2" handle. It would be considered legal in most states. IMHO, it's the best defensive design you can get in a mini-knife.
     
  2. Uath

    Uath

    594
    Oct 25, 2003
    I've seen them called "Finger Hole" knives. Sorry, that's not a good name:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Mephtyrm

    Mephtyrm

    245
    Jan 23, 2011
    I just call those bear claws.
     
  4. Shorttime

    Shorttime

    Oct 16, 2011
    I've usually seen them identified by the design of the knife, with the finger hole added at the end of the description. Uath's would be "upswept skinner with finger hole".

    Since the point of describing something to others is to let them know what your talking about, why not just use Tops' name for it? Pictures and words, and all that.
     
  5. marcinek

    marcinek

    Jan 9, 2007
    I'm partial to the TOPS Cockpit Commander myself....the name makes me giggle.
     
  6. MajorLonghorn

    MajorLonghorn

    367
    Jul 6, 2012
    Does that design compromise the strength of the blade?
     
  7. Grease

    Grease

    May 10, 2012
    No more so than the spyder hole does. Which is to say, probably not enough to ever cause problems during normal and intelligent use.
     
  8. marcinek

    marcinek

    Jan 9, 2007
    Actually, more than the Spyderhole does. Bigger hole as percent of the blade=less steel=less strength.

    But, you ain't gonna baton with these knives, so, like you said, it don't really matter.
     
  9. Uath

    Uath

    594
    Oct 25, 2003
    Both knives pictures are 3/16 thick tempered steel and only 5+- inches overall. I'm sure the hole would have to weaken the knife to SOME degree, just by definition (It wouldn't be as strong as if it were solid...). I just can't imagine breaking it in half. Even if you laid it across two bricks and slammed it with a hammer, you'd be more likely to break the tip, as with any knife.

    I've never encountered a better useable design for a knife with a 2" blade. Ontario used to make a stainless, cheap version of this. It was much thinner steel, I think 1/8". Even that was plenty strong and I usually don't like stainless. Most states allow a 2" blade as legal, even without a weapons permit (Single edged only, it's funny that many states disallow a double-edged blade):

    [​IMG]

    This is a popular version with a concave blade.
     
  10. marcinek

    marcinek

    Jan 9, 2007
    Out of curiosity, why do you feel they are so usable and what do you feel they are usable for?
     
  11. Shorttime

    Shorttime

    Oct 16, 2011
    A short recurve blade with a finger hole would be more controllable than most. Good for any place where what you want to cut is close to what you don't want to cut. Also good for when you want leverage, such as in cutting dense materials.
     
  12. timbit

    timbit

    Jul 21, 2011
    I call them mall-ninja knives.
     
  13. ursamajor

    ursamajor

    Oct 27, 2010
    Finger hole skinners, bear claws, filipino karambits, they have a bunch of names.
     
  14. Uath

    Uath

    594
    Oct 25, 2003
    To be honest, they're useful as defensive knives that can be carried without any kind of permit. Think of the problem; it's only legal to carry a two-inch blade. What's the best possible design for a fighting knife with only a two-inch blade? I think this is it. Also, most of them come in handy clip-sheaths that hide anywhere yet provide instant access. That's why kayakers and rafters use them. I'm a big kayaker and I go out in the ocean quite a bit. My major worry is entanglement. One of these with a serrated edge always fits the bill. I keep a cheap stainless version clipped to my vest (I forget the make).

    I have a concealed weapons permit, but in a lot of places, the average person can't get one. Also, states look for ways to deny you. I know in Georgia, a simple misdomeaner (sp??) convicion for marijuana possession prohibits you from EVER getting a weapons permit, EVER (So much for college indescretion). Got caught in a lark that turned out to be criminal tresspassing? Get in a fight with your, soon-to-be, ex-wife, slap her for the first time ever, and the police show up? Forget about ever legally being able to carry a weapon again, EVER. There are plenty of people who aren't criminals who fall under this catagory. Have you have ever been hospitalized for severe depression? Should that mean you're denied any right to effective self-protection? None of these things apply to me, that's why I'm able to write about it.

    What about walking around in a strange place in a different state? It might be nice to know that the knife you carry is not only legal, but effective.

    It goes without saying to check the knife laws, but 2" single-edged blades are legal almost everywhere. (I do think there are places that prohibit all fixed-blade knives. I could be wrong)
     
  15. marcinek

    marcinek

    Jan 9, 2007
    Wow. No, I don't slap women.
    That aside it sounds like this thread is more "Prac Tac" than "General."
     
  16. Big Mike

    Big Mike

    Aug 30, 2006


    "Good For Nothing" comes to mind.

    If I'm limited in blade length, I still want a full size handle and a blade shape that works for most cutting chores.


    As for a Self Defense Knife, I think that term is an oxymoron and I would certainly not want one of those little knives if the SHTF.


    When it comes to SD, training and awareness trumps a knife every time.


    JMHO, YMMV.




    Big Mike
     
  17. stabman

    stabman Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 17, 2007
    Good.
    Why would I care about the supposed "rights" of such scum?
     
  18. Uath

    Uath

    594
    Oct 25, 2003
    Bad example Stabman. I meant people who have had minor brushes with the law that result in enough of a charge to deny them a weapons permit. Criminal Trespassing might be a better example, as would a college-age marijuana charge.

    Not promoting wife beating.
     

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