what is best budget-mid expense tomahawk-hatchet that can be used for both bushcraft and tactical uses...

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Any suggestions,inexpensive ones,medium priced and what are the best into custom range....and whats best for combat,tactical and bushcraft all around hatchet-axe not too expensive to satisfy those needs...i see many factory and handmade,asnd of different shapes.Any suggestions welcome,i dont have almost any experience with axes.
 
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never heard about it but looked it up,looks pretty good,eastwing hatchet is super strong but the metal in head is soft,thats my experience
 
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this council tool hatchet looks good for all around tasks even defense lol,,,,more devastating than tomahawk and chops way better
 
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Fiskars hatchet that i have has 1 lb head,that feels little light,and steel is soft,am looking for something sturdier,better and forged .Any suggestions,from cheap tomahawks and hatchet to something better???Estwing i had and is tough but is more like hammer...had smallest one.
 
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I had 12 inch estwing ,seemed little light to chop effectivelly,maybe 14 inch is better,and yes its bomb proof hatchet for anything stronger than any tomahawks...any suggestions
 

Bigfattyt

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Jun 23, 2007
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What is "mid priced"

Swamprat Knives has a hawk in 52100 (they call it Sr101 steel).

I had a combat hawk from them (all combat not designed for bushcraft) called the Rattlehawk.

They have one called Sniper Hawk that is more general purpose designed.

Can find them if you look. It is not in current production.

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There is one for sale on a certain auction site.
They were about $225 or so originally, if I remember correctly.
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Tomahawks:
Inexpensive: Cold Steel Spike Hawk, Pipe Hawk or Norse Hawk. CRKT Kangee T-Hawk.
"Medium Priced": HB Forge Hawks.
All of these are good for bushcraft and can be used for tactical purposes too.
Most tactical hawks are not really suited for bushcraft.

Inexpensive Hatchets:
Light hatchets are not the best choice for tactical purposes because of the usually short handles.
They can be handy for bushcraft purposes though:
Vaughan SC1-1/4 Supersteel Camp Axe 33220 (1.25 lb head; 14 5/8" OAL);
Council Tool 1.25 lb. Hudson Bay Axe head with 14″ curved hickory handle;

The heavier hatchets can do a lot of damage but are not so agile as the tomahawks.
The recommendations below are of the heavier type.

The Council Tool Flying Fox (1.625 lb. head, about 16" OAL) is an excellent recommendation, although somewhat heavier than most 16" hatchets.
Vaughan RB 28 Oz Rig Builder/Rigster's Hatchet 20420 (28 oz, 17").
Both will excel at bushcraft, will have some tactical value.
They are much better at chopping, splitting, quick shaping of larger wood pieces or hammering a lot of nails than most tomahawks.
 
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Y
I have fiskars...steel too soft and is too plastic,am looking for smtg between tomahawk and hatchet forged
You could spot for a hultafors or a gransfors bruks if you want. I have the Forrest or the hiking hatchet or something that is super nice.
 
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have seen this vaughn riggers axe,pple all over the forums praise it its crossover between hatchet and tomahawk and can be used for any tactical stuff,i think thats what ill get it,they write the steel is pretty good and can be razor sharp and better than most commercial choices,and ots a tool forst not weapon
 

burninatorzw

Wingard Wearables Co
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For tomahawks, no one tool can do everything, but there are a few general types on the market today that are better at some applications than others. You will know which kind will suit you best for your intended application.

1. Breaching: A number of tomahawks are designed to preform light breaching tasks (ex: prying open padlocks, etc). These are full tang tomahawks, and the big names I hear good things about are RMJ Tactical, Toor Knives, and Winkler Knives, but there are many others. Full tang tomahawks are durable and heavy, and for breaching tasks weight is a great thing to have.

2. Bushcraft/survival: these usually wind up being just as heavy as the full tang tomahawks, but may have a synthetic or wooden handle instead of full tang. More weight is concentrated in the head, so they get better momentum for chopping wood to build fire and shelter. American Tomahawk Company and Wenger Blades make tomahawks that I hear good things about. SOG makes a much more affordable one that may do alright for bushcraft needs.

Both the breaching and bushcraft designs are harder to carry and too sluggish for combatives. You have to count on your opponent being slower than you because the tomahawk chop requires a greater wind up over the shoulder, is slower, and recovery from the chop is very slow. These designs are usually so difficult to carry, that they are often left in a vehicle. Some folks will dangle them off their torso with a sling—and that works until the day you fall to the ground or get slammed against a wall—-then the tomahawk handle gets rammed into your body. Painful and injurious.

3. Combatives: that’s what we design ours for. We based our designs on the historic tomahawks favored by eastern woodland warriors who had to move on foot or by canoe, back when firearm technology was so poor that these tomahawks were often the primary weapon. We tweaked our designs to be ergonomically carried, whether you’re in a car seat all day long or in the office or hiking through the forest. These tomahawks are way, way lighter and faster than those designed for breaching and bushcraft. Nimble and accessible back up weapons. But these are no good for breaching. They do have effective bushcraft capabilities but require unconventional approaches. The 2 models are ...

Backripper Tomahawk is sold out and customer list runs through July:


Empress Tomahawk is presently in stock. It is more of a weapon than a tool:


Best of Fortune with your search and BE EDGY.

Zac with Wingard Wearables Co
 

Hickory n steel

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have seen this vaughn riggers axe,pple all over the forums praise it its crossover between hatchet and tomahawk and can be used for any tactical stuff,i think thats what ill get it,they write the steel is pretty good and can be razor sharp and better than most commercial choices,and ots a tool forst not weapon
Their half hatchet is also a great choice for $20.
A half hatchet is a smaller too, so that gives you a different size option to think about.
 
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