What kind of blade shape is the BEST in what situation? why?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Kizer Cutlery, Mar 22, 2020.

  1. Kizer Cutlery

    Kizer Cutlery Follow our Instagram: kizercutlery_inc Moderator

    506
    Jun 24, 2013
    An other week An other discussion thread!
    This time is: What kind of blade shape is the best in ____? and why?
    Let's fill the blank with a situation like: camping or paper cuting and etc. and discuss why or why not. Come and have fun!!!
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    PS:Thank you guys for taking part in our discussion! Next week's discussion topic will be about quick open;).

    *Since the out break of Coronavirus, Kizer consern about all you guys here, please take care of yourself and you family and stay away from the crowd. Best wishes.*
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
  2. dirc

    dirc

    Jan 31, 2018
    a wharn is excellent for utility use - the straight edge works for many situations

    a drop point is needed to do skinning efficiently

    recurve for some pull cut applications - like rope cutting competition etc?

    (fwiw, I still enjoy the corto leaf blade shape and full flat grind - and the slightly incurve blade position... its like 170 instead of 180 degree spine, which makes the leaf shape blade almost have some recurve qualities, I enjoy it for food prep etc)
     
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  3. Kizer Cutlery

    Kizer Cutlery Follow our Instagram: kizercutlery_inc Moderator

    506
    Jun 24, 2013
    :thumbsup:
     
  4. knarfeng

    knarfeng senex morosus moderator Staff Member Super Mod Moderator

    Jul 30, 2006
    A Wharncliffe or Sheepsfoot excels at starting a cut in the middle of a surface, as when opening a box or blister pack. They excel when you need to start a cut with the point, because as you push the point, you are forcing the blade open. The lock cannot fail, because you are not applying force against it.
     
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  5. comis

    comis Gold Member Gold Member

    460
    May 17, 2013
    There are so many different blade shapes and individual uses, the discussion probably could last forever.

    My quick 2 cents about blade shape or design, as a user, is to take a holistic approach to optimize everything.

    For example, a blade shape may look great on paper, but if the flipper or thumb stud is poorly designed, it's still going to render the whole thing useless. A thick beefy blade doesn't always mean the knife is ready for 'hard use', if the lock and handle doesn't support it.
     
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  6. Puppadore

    Puppadore

    63
    Jan 18, 2020
    I dont really know much about different shapes. I just ordered a $18 Cold Steel Mini Tac Bowie because i needed a cheap small flat knife for backpack shoulder strap carry.

    but I dont know what the bowie shape is for.. what is the purpose of the curved indentation near the tip? Is that to pick on things in small areas?
     
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  7. not2sharp

    not2sharp Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 29, 1999
    A well executed clip or spear point tend to be the most popular.

    N2s
     
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  8. sabre cat

    sabre cat Basic Member Basic Member

    Jul 4, 2014
    After trying different blade styles through the years, I have found that a drop point blade is the most useful for general EDC use.

    This is just my experience and opinion, of course.
     
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  9. Kizer Cutlery

    Kizer Cutlery Follow our Instagram: kizercutlery_inc Moderator

    506
    Jun 24, 2013
    Yes, lets be the longest thread ever! And you have the point, a good knife should have all good stuff fits together. But this time we only talk about the blade shape for actual using, design or other stuff just take them as all prefectly fits the blade shape.;)
     
  10. sabre cat

    sabre cat Basic Member Basic Member

    Jul 4, 2014
    And I have found a drop point to be the most popular.

    I wonder what statistics has to say.
     
  11. Kizer Cutlery

    Kizer Cutlery Follow our Instagram: kizercutlery_inc Moderator

    506
    Jun 24, 2013
    Well, the function of a blade shape usually come from designer's mind and then be tested by knife guys like us in actual using. So if you didn't know what the shape for then ask designer or guys in here, Blade Forums.;)
     
    comis likes this.
  12. sabre cat

    sabre cat Basic Member Basic Member

    Jul 4, 2014
    EDIT: after a small amount of research (and Siri’s help) the best info I have been able to find is that the drop point and clip point
    are the two most common blade types sold. Nothing stated as to which one was the most popular.

    If you consider how popular clip point blades are on traditional folding knives, it just may be the
    winner.
     
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  13. comis

    comis Gold Member Gold Member

    460
    May 17, 2013
    I think it will depend of where we draw the line in the history of blades, but for modern folding knives from last few decades, I would say probably spear point because Victorinox sells literally a million knives a year.

    But no doubt about the importance and popularity of clip point, especially in US.
     
    Prester John likes this.
  14. sabre cat

    sabre cat Basic Member Basic Member

    Jul 4, 2014
    Excellent point. I did not even consider SAK knives. My bad.
     
    comis likes this.
  15. Kizer Cutlery

    Kizer Cutlery Follow our Instagram: kizercutlery_inc Moderator

    506
    Jun 24, 2013
    haha,Thank you!
     
  16. luke2236

    luke2236 Gold Member Gold Member

    153
    Oct 1, 2010
    I’m partial to a clip point or drop point myself.
     
  17. marchone

    marchone Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 13, 2013
    Drop point. Because every general purpose knife in a typical commercial kitchen is one. From paring knives to full-sized Chef's knives, they are all drop points.

    Every other blade shape is a specialized tool.
     
  18. Shorttime

    Shorttime

    Oct 16, 2011
    Wharncliffe, Sheepsfoot, or Nessmuk-style blades work well for nearly every cutting situation in my life. But I'm a town boy, and paper, plastic, and cardboard take up 99% of what I cut. Maybe some styrofoam or fiberglass insulation finds it's way in there some times.

    It would also be nice if it was between 2.875" and 3.25", with a convex zero bevel, and no thumb ramp.
     
    K.O.D. likes this.
  19. woodysone

    woodysone Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 21, 2005
    Those styles are my preference also, still enough point to pierce and enough belly for pull cuts. To be honest my work knife has been the Corto that I picked up when discontinued. I wish I had a backup?;)
     
  20. J. Doyle

    J. Doyle Bladesmith/Knifemaker Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Feb 17, 2008
    The human hand and mind are so versatile when it comes to tool use that one could be proficient at almost any task with any blade shape.

    I've personally witnessed a professional hunting guide field dress an elk with nothing but an 8" rapala filet knife cleaner and faster than most could with a dedicated "hunting" knife.

    Heck, for years I worked with a guy that would open dozens of cardboard boxes a day quickly and efficiently with his car keys.

    I maintain that blade shape is almost purely personal preference and 98% of the time any advantage one has over another at a given task is pretty marginal.
     
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