What makes a fighting knife

Discussion in 'H.I. Cantina' started by Scara, Feb 23, 2015.

  1. Lapedog

    Lapedog

    Dec 7, 2016
    There are so many different styles of fighting knives and even on one individual style of knife (say bowie) there are many different schools of thought on how to use it. So what "makes" a fighting knife a fighting knife is kind of a hard question to answer. This is because different things make different knives proficient in fighting in different ways.

    So what makes a fighting knife? A sharp blade and a handle.
     
  2. Scara

    Scara

    Jun 21, 2014
    Merrell Trail Glove 3s all the way. ;)

    And this has proven to be a remarkably immortal thread, and there's always a new and interesting take every time it comes up. Kind of amazes me how this thread has done.
     
  3. stwm

    stwm

    953
    May 6, 2016
    Thanks for the shoe recommendation
     
  4. ThePeacent

    ThePeacent

    Sep 15, 2013
    To me, a fighting knife can be said of a combat knife, that is, an edged weapon mainly designed to eliminate, incapacitate or kill your enemy in the combat scenario -be it a town, a bunker, a trench line or a jungle-.
    What it makes it different from others it's the idea behind its desing. It is not a survival knife (good for woodworking, hunting, a do-it-all from skinning to chopping), not a utility knife (opneing crates, digging, cutting cord, rope and wire, camp duties...) or a kitchen knife.
    It's a weapon, designed to maim or kill quickly and effectively, and generally that takes back from its versatilty as a tool, a kitchen implement or a sturdy wilderness oriented tool.

    As a result, in my view the blades tend to be very sharp, pointy and not overly thick, there is a grippy handle -with or without guard- and the blade excels at penetrating, thrusting and slashing.
    It has to be quickly accessible, fast in the hand and safe to the user, something like this comes to mind

    [​IMG]

    of course, any blade that gets used to kill or maim in a fight would become a fighting knife, but that is reflected on its usage and not necessarily its design
     
  5. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    I still prefer my atlatl:D

    [​IMG]
    Doesnt work too well in the bedroom tho.
    [​IMG]
    This one's my favorite
    [​IMG]
    Silent killer! I dont think you would survive this! I know it aint a knife but...;)
     
    Lapedog likes this.
  6. Bawanna

    Bawanna Moderator Moderator

    Dec 19, 2012
    Is that a straightening rack or a new design for a multiple arrow launcher?

    Me thinks you was born a few hundred years too late. Many say I'm a 100 years too late.
     
  7. kronckew

    kronckew Basic Member Basic Member

    Aug 17, 2003
    if they get too close you can always hit them with it.
     
  8. kronckew

    kronckew Basic Member Basic Member

    Aug 17, 2003
    on a more steely note: someone else's idea of a fighting knife - i'm guessing a theatre made knife, 10.25 in. blade, guard and bolster are bronze. razor sharp edge is on the same side as the knuckle guard. upper spine & clip section is not sharp. the seax lives on. i'm looking for a nice appropriate scabbard to fit the beast.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Scara

    Scara

    Jun 21, 2014
    Interesting design. Very well made for a theater knife. You could always make your own kydex sheath for it, but leather seems more appropriate for it.

    So here's an interesting question. A lot of people have mentioned pointy blades as fighting knives, but the Hanshee style of kukri was meant purely for fighting, and while pointier than many kukris, is not especially pointy. Dang, I want a hanshee. Some day... some day...
     
  10. stwm

    stwm

    953
    May 6, 2016
    "The Ultimate Fighter"... Cherokee Rose.. L-3... Gelbu Special.... Those are more or less my 'fighting knives'..
     
  11. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    Seaxy knife Kronck! First impression was the top was sharp and the guard was on backwards? Very khul!
     
  12. kronckew

    kronckew Basic Member Basic Member

    Aug 17, 2003
    pushing the limits a bit, the brits issued this 'knife' to the riflemen in the early 19c. the enlisted riflemen (think 'richard sharpe'). they were not allowed to carry swords, these were thus not swords, so they must be knives. ;) - much later the enlisted 'rifles' were issued with 'sword bayonets' to get around the social definitions. the later ones were straight, had attachments for putting it on the end of a rifle and were not well liked as bayonets. the 'bayonets' were also issued to pioneers and also not well liked. the saw teeth were functional but just barely. some were issued to naval forces as cutlasses. also not well liked. the straight ones used in the TV series were well after the napoleonic wars, they would have looked more like this 1831 nodel. the original 'baker' rifle bayonets go for a small fortune.
    [​IMG]

    the straight 1856 one:
    [​IMG]
    (both these are not mine, by the way)

    ...moving along, some bright spark who liked his curvy one bought it at auction after it reached the end of it's official life and 'repurposed' it for use in a later conflict. it has the official double broad arrow stamp for the 'out of service' sale, as does the straight 1856 one above.
    [​IMG]

    i came across it at an antique dealer's auction here a few weeks ago. it wanted to come live with me.
    blade is 55 cm. long (22in.) , 4.5 cm. wide at the guard, 6 mm. thick & distal tapered. the 20cm. 'yelman' (the top sharpened area of the spine ahead of the saw teeth) is razor sharp, as is the blade almost to the guard. guard is 1.2cm. thick brass, carved to match the grip. pommel cap is held by 4 small brass screws with crossed heads. grip is 16cm. from guard to end of pommel. it's 4.2cm dia. at the guard, getting larger near the pommel. the 'saw' part is VERY sharp and the teeth are 'set' properly like a real hand saw, not just notches. blade is pitted, but has been polished and no active rust present. weight sans scabbard is 820gm. no other mark than the double arrow mark, the x just ahead of the guard disk.

    scabbard is wood, covered in what looks like vellum, or thin calfskin, light color, a bit grimey. very well done. brass chape is well made as well. small holes are on the scabbard's spine near the mouth and further down where suspension ring mounts would once have been.

    so, not a bayonet, no longer a pioneer or rifleman's sword bayonet, too heavy for a 'machete' it must be a combat 'fighting' knife. :D i suspect some brit ossifer chopped his way thru SE Asia at some point, possibly a chindit in burmah, or some other clime or era where it was thought useful.

    thus endith the lesson.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2017
  13. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    1.2cm:eek: Thats a heck of a blade! Prolly a fairly notable chopper too if needed! You can tell it aint Japanese cause the teeth go the wrong way:rolleyes: They like pulling chips. We like pushing them. Honestly I think they had a better ideer!
     
  14. Bawanna

    Bawanna Moderator Moderator

    Dec 19, 2012
    Kronckew has the coolest stuff. I really dig these lessons.

    My best to the moat monsters.
     
  15. Howard Wallace

    Howard Wallace . Moderator

    Feb 23, 1999
    I see James Keating has a seminar coming up on the "big 3," Bowie, Arkansas Toothpick, and Khukuri. I may go visit him back of beyond and see what he's been cogitating on.
     
  16. Scara

    Scara

    Jun 21, 2014
    I've been watching some of his Youtube videos again lately. Amazing fighter. I love his Power Passing video in particular. I'd love to go to his seminar on the Big 3, but I'm not exactly in the neighborhood.
     

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