What makes modern lockblades stop closing?

Joined
Nov 8, 2004
Messages
3
Maybe a silly question, but I can't stop thinking about it:

I was looking at an old lockblade I have, not sure the model, but it says "Aitor" on the blade. When it finishes closing, the lockback sort of holds the blade in place, so the blade is not completely touching the handle (you can squeeze it closed a quarter inch more, and then the blade springs back to place when you let go).

What makes modern lockblades, (liner locks, axis locks, etc) stop closing? My mini-griptillion looks like the blade just hits handle and thats that, but I can't imagine a decent knife doing this. Is the nook at the bottom of the blade hitting the axis lock? It seems like the blade would get pretty dull otherwise.
 
Joined
Sep 6, 2004
Messages
278
on my rittergrip, it looks like the bar of the axis lock hits the bottom of the blade below the sharpened part when the blade is closed, stopping the sharpened part from hitting the handle. I think most other knives have a stop-pin or something that does similar duty to this in one way or another.
 

Planterz

Іди на хуй Путін!
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
22,861
On Spyderco lockbacks (at least the FRN ones I have), there's a "kick" on the blade that hits the lockbar when closed. The kick is right at the end of the ricasso, where the edge starts.
 
Joined
May 28, 1999
Messages
2,606
Assuming the liner lock isn't some POS or unconventional design it's the stop pin, on Axis locks it's the Axis locking bar. On microtech Socom's the blade stop for the closed position is milled(cast?) into the aluminum handle, and contacts the choil when closed. If memory serves the CRKT M16's use the thumbstuds as a stop pin in both the open and closed positions.
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2002
Messages
3,215
Most use a stop pin. Others the blade tang works similarly to a lockback in that the tang (heel) rests against the spring, or frame.
 
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