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What to use to sharpen s30v

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Earl1, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. Earl1

    Earl1 Basic Member Basic Member

    254
    May 11, 2016
    Recently I posted on whether to buy a cryo2 or a blur. I bought a blur that had several small chips in the blade that I didn't notice until I opened a package and it began to grab. I returned it and bought a cryo 2. I really like it and have been rather hard on it. But I really liked the ergos on the blur so I just received a blur in s30v. I touched up the edge like I always do on new knives. I've always used a regular whetstone but it took a bit more to get the edge where I wanted it. Very sharp out of the box but who doesn't want a knife a little sharper lol.
    I just wanted some suggestions from people who use this type of blade material. Until now I've only used 420hc and chrome vanadium case carbon steel in us knives. Aus8 and 8cr13mov in imports. All hold decent to good edges but I wanted to try one of the higher end steels
     
  2. Deinos

    Deinos Gold Member Gold Member

    887
    Feb 7, 2016
    Dangerously and Earl1 like this.
  3. knarfeng

    knarfeng senex morosus moderator Staff Member Super Mod Moderator

    Jul 30, 2006
    Any blade made of an alloy containing carbides wants something like an aluminum oxide or diamond sharpening stone. That includes any blade steel with more than ~.8% Carbon, into which category S30V falls.
     
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  4. Blues

    Blues Lapsed SuperMod / Cattle Knife Rustler Staff Member Super Mod

    Oct 2, 1998
    I think diamonds will be your new best friend as you move up the ladder both to, and on from S30V.
    (There are other options, but I think diamonds merit strong consideration. DMT would be my suggestion.)
     
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  5. Earl1

    Earl1 Basic Member Basic Member

    254
    May 11, 2016
    I have been
    looking at dmt. I found a good deal on a set of 4 inch stones
     
  6. Blues

    Blues Lapsed SuperMod / Cattle Knife Rustler Staff Member Super Mod

    Oct 2, 1998
    Unless you are going with Diafolds for a particular reason, I personally would recommend going with 6"x2" or larger. (Of course, only you know what your budget allows.)
     
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  7. Earl1

    Earl1 Basic Member Basic Member

    254
    May 11, 2016
    I have been
    looking at dmt. I found a good deal on a set of 4 inch stones
     
  8. Mo2

    Mo2

    Apr 8, 2016
    I'd recommend some bonded diamond stones (but really any diamond stones will work). And diamond paste strop. Makes it much easier to sharpen s30v and other powdered steel.
     
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  9. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger

    Sep 20, 2015
    This ^
    Now it is quite possible to get an extremely sharp edge with say Shapton Glass stones or others but I think I am fairly convinced that the S30V has a more durable edge off the diamonds. I go all the way up to DMT 8,000 because I like polished edges for push cutting.

    Why the edge is more durable is kind of complicated. The vanadium carbides are harder than most all the sharpening stones including ceramic. The diamond grit is able to actually shape the vanadium carbides; the other stones kind of push the softer metal around the vanadium carbides and create a sharp edge in spite of not cutting the vanadium carbides but from my very limited experience with S30V I think it is worth going with the diamonds. Generally I prefer the other stones over diamond so I would actually prefer it if I didn't have to use diamond stones.

    For sharpening the even higher vanadium carbide alloys such as S110V it is a very obvious improvement using diamonds. I was surprised that it seems to be worth doing on a lower vanadium carbide steel such as S30V.
     
  10. Diamond is a no-brainer for S30V, and makes it a breeze to sharpen. As mentioned, S30V has just enough vanadium carbide content to create complications in sharpening on other abrasive media (especially aluminum oxide and natural stones), which won't be quite hard enough to adequately shape & thin those carbides. What will be noticed in trying other abrasives, will at the very least be issues with poor edge durability, as those abrasives erode away the supporting matrix steel adjacent to the carbides, leaving them weakly bound in the edge. Edges can be made sharp to some degree, but they just won't last as long as an edge sharpened with a diamond hone. This will be more noticeable at finer finish, especially below ~ 10 micron or so. But the improvement in sharpness and durability can also be seen at coarser grit finishes as well, for the same reasons.

    Other complications can include premature glazing of stones not up to the task, meaning the harder vanadium carbides in the steel will effectively wear and polish the less-hard abrasive in the stone. This means the cutting edges of the stone's abrasive grit won't cut effectively anymore, even on less wear-resistant steels, and the stones will become very slow-working or stop working altogether, unless or until the stone's surface is reconditioned. If you notice your conventional stones/hones are becoming glassy-looking on the surface, that's what's going on (glazing).
     
  11. Alberta Ed

    Alberta Ed

    Jun 29, 1999
    The current crop of 'super steels' with high volumes of carbides (vanadium, chromium, niobium, etc.) respond well to diamond hones, as diamonds are about the only substance that can cut them. DMTs work fine for me and have for decades.
     
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  12. PeterS84

    PeterS84 Sharpening addict, collector of super steels Platinum Member

    181
    May 9, 2018
    I would look seriously at SiC or diamond hones for S30V... both will sharpen it easily. Also both will be ready to work on pretty much any steel you're likely to acquire in the future.
     
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  13. Earl1

    Earl1 Basic Member Basic Member

    254
    May 11, 2016
    It looks like diamonds it is. I thought that they would do the best job but I'd rather have some other opinions than just my own. Thanks for all the info. How will s35vn co.pare to s30v
     
  14. PeterS84

    PeterS84 Sharpening addict, collector of super steels Platinum Member

    181
    May 9, 2018
    S35VN is supposed to be tougher than S30V, according to all the data sheets I've seen. I have both and have noticed no discernible difference in use or sharpening... in my mind they're equivalent.
     
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  15. DeadboxHero

    DeadboxHero Triple B Handmade Knives, Big Brown Bear Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 22, 2014
    You'll find s35vn a bit easier to sharpen.
    It's also a bit tougher
    Doesn't cut as long though, nor does the edge get as aggressive.

    Regardless, you have to make a burr and remove the burr to get the crispest edge and any angle inconsistencies on the bevel will reduce the sharpness and performance.

    SiC stones work too
     
  16. Alberta Ed

    Alberta Ed

    Jun 29, 1999
    S35Vn, judging by my Sebbie 21, will take a finer edge than S30V and is easier to sharpen (on diamond hone).
     
  17. kniferbro

    kniferbro

    Jan 22, 2011
    Get diamonds and never have to ask this question again!
     
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