Whatcha listnin to oo oo?

Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
472
Gundulić's most famous play is Dubravka, a pastoral written in 1628, where he rhapsodises on the former glory of Dubrovnik and contains some of the most famous verses in Croatian literature.

Fair liberty, beloved liberty, liberty sweetly avowed,
thou are the treasured gift that God to us endowed,
all our glory is thy true creation,
to our Home thou are all the decoration,
no silver nor gold, not life itself could replace the
reward of thy pure and sublime grace.
 

Blues

hovering overhead
Staff member
Super Mod
Joined
Oct 2, 1998
Messages
26,942
At the moment, the 3rd CD (out of 5) of the Joe Henderson, Mosaic Records set.

See description and hear clips at: Joe Henderson Blue Note Studio Sessions

It's one of about 110 Mosaic Records sets that I own. Collecting jazz music (mainly from the 50/60's) is one of the other "things" that I do.
sgt1372 sgt1372

We have that in common. I'm a big "hard bop" fan. Early 50's to mid 60's is my thing. Monk, Mingus, Miles, Coltrane, Evans, Blakey et al.

I got to see some great acts when I lived in NYC and my buddy ran the West End up in Harlem by Columbia U.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
1,024
sgt1372 sgt1372

We have that in common. I'm a big "hard bop" fan. Early 50's to mid 60's is my thing. Monk, Mingus, Miles, Coltrane, Evans, Blakey et al.

I got to see some great acts when I lived in NYC and my buddy ran the West End up in Harlem by Columbia U.

I saw Monk open for Diz at Carnegie Hall in 1976. And I lived in an apartment complex that Monk lived until he had to leave because people didn't like the "piano noise." And I did my time at The West End and C.U. You can call me "Misterioso." Shall I go on?
 

Blues

hovering overhead
Staff member
Super Mod
Joined
Oct 2, 1998
Messages
26,942
I saw Monk open for Diz at Carnegie Hall in 1976. And I lived in an apartment complex that Monk lived until he had to leave because people didn't like the "piano noise." And I did my time at The West End and C.U. You can call me "Misterioso." Shall I go on?
I think we can both go on. Phil Schaap (multiple Grammy Award winner for archival jazz research etc) was a dear friend of mine during high school and college years. He ran the jazz at WKCR and West End. I was a regular down at all the haunts in the Village...where I'd see Blakey, Mingus et al.

The "Kettle of Fish" on McDougal St. was my main hangout during several of those years.

Wouldn't trade it for the world.

I'm a huge Monk fan. First two jazz albums I ever bought were his...and also Coltrane's "Lush Life".

Them was the days.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
1,024
I think we can both go on. Phil Schaap (multiple Grammy Award winner for archival jazz research etc) was a dear friend of mine during high school and college years. He ran the jazz at WKCR and West End. I was a regular down at all the haunts in the Village...where I'd see Blakey, Mingus et al.

The "Kettle of Fish" on McDougal St. was my main hangout during several of those years.

Wouldn't trade it for the world.

I'm a huge Monk fan. First two jazz albums I ever bought were his...and also Coltrane's "Lush Life".

Them was the days.

That's totally cool. Phil was a little ahead of me at C.U., but I was fortunate enough to be hanging around when he was doing his thing at The West End. As for the rest of it, if you were there, you know what NYC was like in those days. Just being on the streets was like being hooked up to an electrical circuit. The pace of life and the music in the clubs and bars. It was the real real for real. Now, if I think of the Village and MacDougal Street, and my days wandering around like the young fool that I was, tears come to me eyes. Guess you'll have to write me off as an old guy. I hope you will share more about the Kettle of Fish and the music you heard there.
 

Blues

hovering overhead
Staff member
Super Mod
Joined
Oct 2, 1998
Messages
26,942
You should look for a book called "A Fan's Notes" by Frederick Exley. I loaned the book to the two brothers that owned the "Kettle of Fish" at the time, as the bar figured into the story. It's not about jazz per se, but it's a very interesting look at the time and things going on in the Village of the 50's.

I think you would enjoy it.

We can take our discussion about jazz elsewhere so we don't put everyone else to sleep.



 
Top