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Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson

If you haven't started the epic saga yet - do yourself a favor the first 3 volumes are out already.

I have promised myself only to read multi-book series when the series is complete. I don't want this song of ice and fire BS or wheel of time where the author died to happen. That one is definitely on my radar!
 
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I’m shocked no one mentioned Ayn Rand yet!

Grog, see if you can find an old copy of Atlas Shrugged anywhere. I have a copy broken into 2 volumes, printed in ‘57 and it’s amazingly satisfying to read.

I read tons of Dragonlance as a teen too. Bought at least 25 of them for my wife a few years back when she was off her feet for a bit. Chronicles 1-3 are awesome. I’ll second that suggestion.
 

ridnovir

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I have promised myself only to read multi-book series when the series is complete. I don't want this song of ice and fire BS or wheel of time where the author died to happen. That one is definitely on my radar!
Sanderson is a genius. (by the way he was the author selected to finish the wheel of time) he is in good health and so far has released the books in his own saga (which is EPIC) on schedule it should be 10 volumes long and the wait for the next volume only ads to the suspense.
 
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Sanderson is a genius. (by the way he was the author selected to finish the wheel of time) he is in good health and so far has released the books in his own saga (which is EPIC) on schedule it should be 10 volumes long and the wait for the next volume only ads to the suspense.

Dangit! I may have to break my promise because of you. Might as well, as I am waiting for the third book from Patrick Rothfuss in the King Killer Chronicles. That is good stuff as well.
 
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Cap’n Smudge

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I’m shocked no one mentioned Ayn Rand yet!

Grog, see if you can find an old copy of Atlas Shrugged anywhere. I have a copy broken into 2 volumes, printed in ‘57 and it’s amazingly satisfying to read.
“Atlas Shrugged” and “The Fountainhead” are both great reads. “Anthem” was my favorite of hers.
 

Apocryphiliac

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I keep hearing rumors of a movie. Hope they come true some day.
Yeah, I had heard Ridley Scott was attached at one point. I am as big a fan as there is of his early stuff, but he's been very uneven the past ~20 years or so. I don't know if he could do that book justice with a film. Tbh, I don't really know that anyone could. The Road was very adaptable, but Blood Meridian? To me, not so much...
 
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grogimus grogimus if you haven't read the Story of Edgar Sawtelle, I think you would like it. I really enjoyed it, dogs and a Stephen King vibe. I really enjoyed The Poisonwood Bible too. Rightnow I am reading Runninf for My Life and my friend's new book Talk to the Paw. Trying to get back to Something Wixked this way Comes.

I kinda loved Edgar Sawtelle, and kinda hated it. The writing from Almondine's perspective was wonderful and it was pretty ambitious having a person who couldn't speak as the protagonist. The resolution was pretty unsatisfying though. There was no way for Edgar's mom to know what a shit he (edit- by he I meant Claude) was.

I've read almost everything by Cormac McCarthy. Also recommend the Hyperion Cantos for Sci-Fi buffs. Haven't really read much since The last book from that lazy, procrastinating Martin. Finish the series already ;). Mist Born was pretty amazing as well.

Never read McCarthy, will have to pick one up.
I like Sanderson but his characters seem pretty thin to me.
grogimus grogimus if you like urban fantasy, you should check out the laundry series from Charles Stross. I like his sci-fi, as well. Another Brit in the UF genre is Ben Aaronovitch, rivers of London.

Sci-fi wise I like both hard sci-fi and the easy reading ones. Hannu Rajaniemi's quantum thief serie, Al Robertson's crashing heaven & waking hell and the Netflix Expanse in book form (James s.a. Carey) are all worth checking out.

I haven't read much fantasy since the 90's Eddings, Jordan & R.R. Martin playing the waiting game.. However, I ran into Sanderson's stormlight archives, and found myself enjoying them. Third book just out.. but I haven't gotten to it just yet.

I'll have to take a look at Erikson's work. :)

Apocalypse, and after.. I gotta give it to Metro 2033 and the following novels expanding the story. If you're a gamer you could play the story as well.

Crap, I could go on..
Thanks for all the recommendations! My favorite urban fantasy is Jim Butcher's Dresden Files. It starts off light but grows up along the way.
Have you read Tad Williams' 'Otherland' series?

Not yet. I'm actually remembering why I originally thought the Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series was such a slog.
Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson

If you haven't started the epic saga yet - do yourself a favor the first 3 volumes are out already.
I thought the first Stormlight book was amazing. The character development and storyline was fantastic. I don't dislike the 2nd or 3rd book but they don't have the same impact to me.
 
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I’m shocked no one mentioned Ayn Rand yet!

Grog, see if you can find an old copy of Atlas Shrugged anywhere. I have a copy broken into 2 volumes, printed in ‘57 and it’s amazingly satisfying to read.

I read tons of Dragonlance as a teen too. Bought at least 25 of them for my wife a few years back when she was off her feet for a bit. Chronicles 1-3 are awesome. I’ll second that suggestion.
I did a paper on Atlas Shrugged in college- by which I mean I didn't read it and BS'ed a bunch of crap about it from cliff notes and skimming it. I should pick that one up I think, I've watched and read some interviews with her and she seems an interesting if not very likeable person.

Dragonlance books are a big of a guilty pleasure still. The Weis and Hickman books were really fun.
 

Lorien

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not an easy read! But I'm tryin...slowly
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Casinostocks

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Only the small words. Pictures help a lot.

I was going to recommend this lil known obscure book with lots of pictorials, but the crowd in here is way too serious for my smutty silliness! What was that book's name? Getting old and the memory is fading! Was it Karmela Sumatra? Something like that!
 

UffDa

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I was going to recommend this lil known obscure book with lots of pictorials, but the crowd in here is way too serious for my smutty silliness! What was that book's name? Getting old and the memory is fading! Was it Karmela Sumatra? Something like that!

Karmela Sumatra? That sounds like something you can buy at Starbucks.

Actually, I know the book that you are writing about. ;) (Giggle) It was written by some Indian guy. He lives three blocks over. I think his name is Vātsyāyana or something like that.
 
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Just wanted to say thank you for the recs in this thread. I've read Old Man's War, the first Jack Reacher novel and started Gardens of the Moon since it was started. All fantastic books and looks like my reading list will be full for a while. Thanks a bunch!

Kyle
 

xxwarderxx

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I read the Dragonlance books in junior high which were great.

Read quite a few of the Forgotten Realms books (surprised no one mentioned these yet with all the Dragonlance readers) in high school starting with the Icewind Dale trilogy.

Many years later, my brother turned me on to the Wheel of Time series.

I’m surprised how many here share similar tastes.

More recently, I’ve read One Second After and Going Home.



I agree with you the author of Going Home is a serious gear nut. I kinda like it though as it turned me on to a lot of gear that I didn’t know about otherwise.

Definitely going to check out some of your other recommendations.


...William R. Forstchen - 'One Second After', and 'One Year After'

Bobby Akart - The 'Blackout' series.

Franklin Horton - 'Locker Nine', 'Grace Under Fire'. Just read these and they're pretty decent. Probably going to check out his 'The Borrowed World' series.

I tried reading 'Going Home' and the 2nd of the books in A. American's 'The Survivalist Series', but just couldn't get into them.

The author's too much of a gear nut for my tastes, and lists the exact make and model of EVERY item the protagonist uses (and who the heck would pack 2 sleep systems and 3 cooking systems in a GHB while complaining about the 60lb load?), and the protagonist continually randomly encounters uber-prepared folks who are happy to help/share.
 

bluemax_1

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More recently, I’ve read One Second After and Going Home.



I agree with you the author of Going Home is a serious gear nut. I kinda like it though as it turned me on to a lot of gear that I didn’t know about otherwise.

Definitely going to check out some of your other recommendations.
If you like the post-apocalyptic/prepper genre, then I definitely recommend Franklin Horton and Bobby Akart.

Just began reading Franklin Horton's "Borrowed World" series (same Universe as the Locker Nine series, which actually came out later, but I read those first due to an Amazon Kindle deal). FH also tends to list gear, but the scenarios he paints are a lot more realistically possible in a calamity (simply based on observations from small scale disasters), and made me consider certain things.

In the Locker Nine series, he also presents the concept of pre-planning/networking with like-minded individuals.

Bobby Akart is also an author who's actually written prepper/survival manuals (Prepping For Tomorrow series).

His fiction series like the Blackout series draw from that experience to get people thinking (which he explains, was one of his intentions; not to make a survival manual series, but to write entertainment that might get people thinking about simple things they can do to be better prepared).

I've always been a fan of bushcraft and learning/developing survival skills (hence my love for quality knives/tools), and although I'm not as deep into prepping/hoarding as some folks are, I still like reading things that get me thinking about stuff I hadn't really considered.

Both Horton and Akart's writing have aspects that benefit preppers (whether those just getting into the concept, or those who've already begun), while also being entertaining.

I personally just couldn't get into A. American's, "Hey, I just happened by chance, to keep running into people with either tons of stored food they're happy to share, or uber-operators who'll happily give away expensive equipment".

That, and within the first few chapters, my first thought was, "Does this writer own a camping/survival gear store? Because this book reads like an infomercial for stuff, while not really being very sensible/informative for actual prepping/survival".
 
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