Who is the most effective combative arts teacher by your standards today?

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Nov 1, 2007
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Maganda Gabi, ( Evening ) Hetman.

Out of curiousity, do you know where Guro Agbulos is presently Headquartered? Also, if he has left any certified Astig Lameco in California to spread his interpretation of the system ?

Salamat, * thanks.

ADF
 
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Nov 1, 2007
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1. Grand Master Yuli Romo (my teacher, mentor & adopted father)
That's just a few that I know that are in my opinion top notch!

All you teachers, give yourself credit and put your work first and foremost...it is up to you to teach your clan. Keep your mind and heart open..learn from a stone so that you may teach a rock!..Salamat

Punong Guro Mike Blackgrave
BaHad ZuBu
SATX..Western HQ

Maganda Gabi, PG Blackgrave.

I guess it's safe to say you had a priveledged learning experience under GM Romo. Bravo, pare. Must have been sweet for You. Moreover, it will only get sweeter as time goes by.

ADF
 
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May 22, 2006
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Guro Agbulos lives in LA, which is also where he runs his classes. I do not think that he has any certified instructors, but I suggest that you try reaching him directly through his web site www.astiglameco.com

Walang anuman...
 
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Oct 26, 2007
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Rodger's a very nice guy and very talented. If you're in the L.A. area I would definitely encourage you to contact him and learn from him.

Best,

Steve Lamade
 
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Nov 1, 2007
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Hello, Steve and readers of the thread.


Steve, I think a lot of people would be surprised to know of the breadth and depth of FMA instruction on the East Coast.

I am a Happy So. Cal kind of Guy but am quite aware that good people are diligently plying their " craft " in the Northeast.

Not to mention, classical music ( Vivaldi, Bach, etc ) goes very well with Northeastern Winters while driving to all nighter FMA training classes. lol. " there's a surreal likeness to the Hannibal Lechter character when you think about it. " Fairly vicious techniques and styles ( with the potential ) to make Trial Lawyers wealthier than they already are.

I agree with Mr. Lamade in that we each " experience " life / combat, individually. Therefore, the driving question of this thread is answered " subjectively. "

I feel the bulk curricula being taught by FMA Systems are meant ( mainly not exclusively ) for life on the streets of non industrial nations. Nations where the violent reality is that the legal and investigative capacities of a city draw upon less resources compared to the USA. Thereby, making " accountability " at least partially determined by the ( individual ) who did the damage.

Whether you live in New England or the Great Plains, Los Angeles or Atlanta.... when you hurt someone seriously.... well... you're rolling the dice with your future. Whether you were in the " right " or not.

I beg the experienced FMA'ers forgive my rant but hey... i believe most would concur. Concur, that the FMA are a slant on a whole different animal.

You can use it on the Southside of Chicago to protect yourself and do the right thing, by society. However, you will be accountable for what you have done. We do not live in the developing world.

Heck, if you're just going to do the suburban American life, thing. Maybe, all you really need is common sense.


Steve, How do you like the P.Tirsia?


ADF aka Ruther
 
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Pekiti Tirsia's a great art. One of my teachers, Tom Bisio, was one of Grand Tuhon Leo Gaje's top students during the '70's and '80's; I haven't studied any Pekiti from Tom, however, except whatever I've picked up incidentally. Most of my time with him has been spent learning Xing Yi Quan and San Miguel Eskrima.

Whenever I get the chance I train with Wes Tasker, who is one of Tuhon William McGrath's top students. Wes is a great guy, and well worth the time to look up if you are in the Boston area. To complete your metaphor, Wes also knows a lot about classical Persian music, among some other things.

Best,

Steve
 
Joined
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Pekiti Tirsia's a great art. One of my teachers, Tom Bisio, was one of Grand Tuhon Leo Gaje's top students during the '70's and '80's; I haven't studied any Pekiti from Tom, however, except whatever I've picked up incidentally. Most of my time with him has been spent learning Xing Yi Quan and San Miguel Eskrima.

Whenever I get the chance I train with Wes Tasker, who is one of Tuhon William McGrath's top students. Wes is a great guy, and well worth the time to look up if you are in the Boston area. To complete your metaphor, Wes also knows a lot about classical Persian music, among some other things.

Best,

Steve

Hi, Steve.

Thanks. Is Tom Bisio still involved with P.T. ? The following if you will seems to have evolved into two distinct camps and I was wondering which one Tom considered himself a part of. I never met Tuhon Gaje. But, I gather it's like working with Vince Lombardi of the 60's Packers.

Productive with an emphasis on Details. Further, the teaching style would seem to be a Demanding which is not everyone's cup of tea.

How do you like the San Miguel Eskrima? Do you feel it leans more towards blade or stick? Intellectually speaking do you feel there is value in merging the two formats?

Are you affiliated with the SME association in Buena Park, CA?

Finally, Mr. Lamade. What range would you consider S.M.E. Largo, Medio, or Corto?



Have a Good Evening. As always I appreciate your time.


ADF
 
Joined
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Thanks. Is Tom Bisio still involved with P.T. ? The following if you will seems to have evolved into two distinct camps and I was wondering which one Tom considered himself a part of.

I couldn't say - and I don't think that its a productive question. Tom hasn't actively taught Pekiti Tirsia for over 10 years. He left GT Gaje's organization on good terms. Tom and William McGrath were friends and training partners as they moved up through the PTK ranks and remain cordial to this day. Tom's interests lie far more in the direction of Chinese martial arts and Chinese medicine these days: www.tombisio.com

I never met Tuhon Gaje. But, I gather it's like working with Vince Lombardi of the 60's Packers....Productive with an emphasis on Details. Further, the teaching style would seem to be a Demanding which is not everyone's cup of tea.

Training with GT Gaje would be an extremely valuable experience for anyone, and I encourage anyone interested in PTK to do so.

How do you like the San Miguel Eskrima? Do you feel it leans more towards blade or stick? Intellectually speaking do you feel there is value in merging the two formats?

I think that San Miguel Eskrima leans toward the blade although it is taught intitially with the stick - but you could say the same about PTK. They are difficult to learn at the same time (let's say during the same evening class) because there are issues of distancing and angling that are addressed primarily by different footwork - it's a tall plate for one sitting. But Wes and I taught a couple of seminars in '05 wherein we compared both arts and I think that we showed that we were both using different vehicles to drive to the same place. It's not so much "merging the two formats" so much as understanding and appreciating the intrinsic values of each one.

Are you affiliated with the SME association in Buena Park, CA?

No - Tom learned SME from Momoy, but outside the umbrella of the Doce Pares Multi-Style organization. I learned from Tom, so....

Since you're in California it would make sense to go to Ramon Rubia and the Buena Park group if you're interested in SME. Ramon learned from Momoy and several senior teachers under Momoy such as Edring Casio, Banoy Borja, Kano Canete, etc.

Finally, Mr. Lamade. What range would you consider S.M.E. Largo, Medio, or Corto?

I'd consider it largo art with some forays into the medio range when you close with the knife or do tie-ups, etc.

Best,

Steve
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2007
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46
Good Evening, Steve.

Thank you very much for taking the time to reply. There are a lot of schools to visit in the " Southland " of Cali.


Your conspirator in making the world, a better place.


Ruther
 
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