Why are "False Edges" even there?

Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
178
My ultimate folder would have a fully plain edge and a fully (95%) serrated edge.
With the AF handle symmetry, I can rotate to make either the "primary" edge.
I dream of this knife ;). Who likes sawing with 1.5 inches of serrations?

Basically a SOG Pentagon folder?

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I've always thought one like below, with one edge all regular and one edge all serrated would make a good boat/marine type knife.

4691-1.jpg
 
Joined
Nov 28, 2002
Messages
9,375
Why would it be called a "false" edge if it was sharp? :confused:

I'm quite certain that a False Edge is not sharp. Otherwise it would be just an 'edge'-as in, double edged.

Maybe it is called false edge because it is not the primary edge. Just guessing.

It is true you hear "unsharpened false edge" or sometimes simply "false edge" used when describing a swedge. There is not always a consistency when using the two terms.

I go with. Swedge = not sharp. False edge = sharp.

I think as safe bet when questions like this come up is to just trust what AG Russell says.

I love to see swedges on slipjoint pocket knives by the way.
 

Gollnick

Musical Director
Joined
Mar 22, 1999
Messages
29,258
I am out of here after one more effort.

YOU ARE NOT TALKING ABOUT FALSE EDGES, POCKET KNIFE BLADES ARE SWEDGED

A FALSE EDGE IS A SHARP AREA ON THE BACK OF A BOWIE OR FIGHTER BLADE

Exactly.

A false edge is an edge; it is sharpened. It is "false" in that it does not run the full length of the blade.

An unsharpend suggestion of an edge on the spine is called a "swedge." A swedge improves the blade's stabbing performance while avoiding the legal qualification as a double-edged knife.
 

Charlie Mike

Sober since 1-7-14 (still a Paranoid Nutjob)
Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Nov 1, 2000
Messages
28,365
Thanks for clearing it up. That's what I figured.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Messages
958
Maybe it is called false edge because it is not the primary edge. Just guessing.

It is true you hear "unsharpened false edge" or sometimes simply "false edge" used when describing a swedge. There is not always a consistency when using the two terms.

I go with. Swedge = not sharp. False edge = sharp.

I think as safe bet when questions like this come up is to just trust what AG Russell says.

I love to see swedges on slipjoint pocket knives by the way.

I love it when a term get so far degraded it becomes correct to use it incorrecly, irregardless of the vocabulary nuances, i found this at knife art, but it doesnt explain a swedge:

- False Edge

Many knives have bevels not just along the bottom edge of the knife, but along the top as well. When present, bevels on the top edge are referred to as a "false edge". The false edge can be either sharpened or not. Whether or not the false edge is sharp, it serves to take metal away from the point, and thus enhance penetration. But taking away metal at the point also weakens the point, so this is a compromise between penetration ability and strength.
 
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