Wire saw good equipment or rubbish!

Joined
Dec 30, 2005
Messages
420
Next to my 10 inch overall fixed blade I carry a LM multitool. To have a good tool for working whit wood/trees I think of using a wire saw. I own one now but I really do not have any trust in it. Do’s anyone now how error free and what quality they are? And is it wisdom to carry two or thee wire saw’s? If you recommend an other piece of equipment remember it has to be not to expensive and light weight and give some details.
 

Blue Sky

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2002
Messages
3,123
I've only read what others say about them, which is this: some are better than others and none are what you would call tough. In an emergency, and with some care, a wire saw might be very handy to have (and carrying 2-3 sounds like a good idea too). For regular or sustained use I think a folding saw is a better choice; there are many to choose from. Wire saws aren't very expensive, so my suggestion is to take one outside and work with it. You'll soon find out how trustworthy it is. Oh, and then come back and tell us about it, of course.:)
 
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
1,523
There are some good wire saws available the one from the official marine survival kit comes to mind as seen on http://www.donrearic.com/usmckit.htm I don't carry one though. I carry a sabrecut which is kind of like a chainsaw/wiresaw hybrid. Cuts like crazy, and durable to boot.
 

Cougar Allen

Buccaneer (ret.)
Joined
Oct 9, 1998
Messages
72,073
Is there really such a thing as a good wire saw? I had a wire saw when I was a kid. It could saw through a stick if you didn't mind spending hours at it.

Let's try this question on the guys in the Wilderness & Survival Forum.

ThreadMoving.jpg
 
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Messages
98
Would suggest folding saw various prices see what suits your budget.Have used wire saws the bcb sas /commando .okay but feel the folder cuts quicker and is less prone to snagging etc. I found even when i had it tensioned on either end of a stick(bow style)it wasn't rigid enough and a bit bouncy if that makes sense.Definately the folding saw unless space/weight is a SERIOUS issue.:thumbup:
 
Joined
May 8, 2002
Messages
87
I have used a few wire-type folding saws, and they have worked great for me. Just keep two things in mind when you are using them:

1. Make sure that the rings are crimped to the saw tightly so they don't come off when you are using the saw. You could always make another handle out of something if you had to, though.

2. Make sure that you keep tension on the saw while cutting something. Don't let it get loose, or it will bind and/or break
 

dantzk8

Basic Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2005
Messages
1,625
To well use a wire saw you have to keep it straight and make the maximum of length work. Be slow, the idea is to avoid the saw heats. It's not as efficient and reliable as a folding saw but it's a good backup.

dantzk.
 

IntheWoods

Banned
Joined
Jan 7, 2006
Messages
190

V_Shrake

Banned
Joined
Nov 13, 2005
Messages
50
While I don't consider a wire saw as "front line" equipment, they do have their place in your kit. If you have the space/weight, by all means it's best to carry a good folding saw. I have both a Sierra Saw and an Opinel folding saw; the Sierra goes in my ruck and the Opi is on my knife belt.

But the SAS wire saw, available from Brigade Quartermasters, is a good thing to have in a mini-kit. Especially since, if you're only carrying a pocketknife or 2 (assuming you're caught with just your EDC gear) you might need to cut poles for a shelter or firewood. To use the saw properly requires that you harvest a green bough, split both ends to insert the saw's handles, and then saw carefully. Using the wiresaw in this manner you can cut a surprsing amount of wood. Once done cutting, though, don't just take the saw off thes tick and roll it back up. Allow the saw to cool donw comletely and THEN roll it up. Rolling up a warm saw is a sure way to break it.
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2004
Messages
76
I have used my wire saw and I view it as an emergency backup due to its size and the duration that it could be used for. For most of my other cutting duties I carry a gerber cross cut saw, works awesome. I also own a pocket chain saw which is great as well. In the pocket saw department, the beefier and the little more expensive versions are the way to go.
 
Joined
May 8, 2001
Messages
2,548
My experience with the wire saws was about the same a s Cougar’s. The newer wire saws are supposed to be better…don’t know….haven’t tried them.


I would recommend the Fiskars saw that IntheWoods linked to (also marketed by Gerber as the Exchange-A-Blade Sport Saw). This saw is light and cuts extremely well…spare blades are available as is an interchangeable finer toothed bone cutting blade.


The Bahco Laplander (also sold by Kershaw) is a very good saw too.





- Frank
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
15,288
I have the "Pocket Chain Saw" and that works well. The teeth are just like chain saw teeth .I use it mostly for cutting tree limbs that are too high for normal means [ladder etc].
 

skammer

Banned
Joined
Jan 18, 2005
Messages
2,257
The wire saws are not meant for serious sawing but rather an emergency sawing situation. The benefit as mentioned is they will coil up and fit in a tiny EDC tin kit so its with you all the time.

There are quality differences in the wire saws. I have tried them all and found the BCB saw the best by far. The Cohglans saw is junk.

If you use any wire saw incorrectly you will break it, you must splay your hands wide to allow air to cool the steel and avoid any kinks in the metal that weaken it. That said they have their limitations.

I own the sabre cut saw with the bi-directional chain saw teeth and think its ok for soft wood but due to the large space between the cutting teeth it vibrates your soul when using on hardwood. The other type saw that comes in a tin I would think a better all round pocket chain saw as the teeth are closely spaced and more uniform, though I have not used it.

Skam
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
1,650
Wire saws are better then teeth and nails... but not by far.

Pocket chain saws are efficient, but it is not the same class of price/weight/encumbrance...

for their weight I'd choose a folding saw (bahco/fiskars/...) other tem.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Messages
3,381
Does anyone know where I can purchase one of these high speed US Marine Corp Survival Kits?
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Messages
3,381
To bad for the Corp! U.S Army 10th MTN Div (L) had first dibbs on this old Man!
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
394
I use one the SAS wire saws & find it to be good kit. Ive cut wood, bone, plastic, even soft metals. Better if used as the "blade" of a bow saw, and worked carefully. And as V Shrake said, DO make sure you keep the wire taut as it cools down, THEN roll it up cold.
 
Top