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Sledge Hammers!

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by steve-in-kville, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    My favorite is a 20oz 999ml
     
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Yep, that's a good one. Straight claws are most useful. Vaughan's have good steel and great finish. Plus they have their own hickory handle plant.
     
  3. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    The riggers axe for me followed closely by the 32oz California framer. I haven't seen the 32oz California framer for a while. It might have went the way of the passenger pigeon. We have the magic of titanium now that hits just as hard with less weight.:rolleyes:
    It matters not the trades are full of guys that can't drive a nail. Ya, I know there are a few that can.
     
  4. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    What I like even more than the 999ml is an old craftsman hammertooth ( 50's-60's ) made by Vaughan of course which is basically a 999ml with ribbed claws and an extra little nail puller.
     
  5. JD Spydo

    JD Spydo

    Nov 20, 2004
    Years ago when I did a lot of "rough in" carpentry work I had a Vaughn 28 oz framing hammer and I still have it. Once you got good enough to use it with accuracy you literally could drive a 16 penny nail all the way in with one precision blow. VAUGHN made a lot of good striking tools> I believe at one time my dad have one of their sledge hammers.
     
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    I would use one firm blow to set the nail and one blow to sink it with a 24oz framing hammer. I typically used a light blow to set and 2 blows to drive but if I wanted to show off I'd set it with a hard blow and drive it in one. Risky to your fingers to do it this way.

    I still have that hammer. The waffle face almost completely smooth now. I've driven 50 pounds of 16d sinkers in a day with that hammer - interior partitions.
     
  7. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    An 8lb straight peen forging hammer and an all original Plumb 4lb spike maul (unusual!)

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    That's a cool spike maul.
     
  9. andrewsdesign83

    andrewsdesign83

    23
    Aug 3, 2016
    Finished this up last week. 1-1/2 lb PLUMB ball peen hammer. Cleaned and re-hung on the original handle. Sanded and finished with BLO.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    These are a 2.5lb Woodings-Verona crosspein on a 14" handle, a 3lb Sheffield Steel crosspein on a 16" handle, and an 8lb Plumb on a thick 18" handle.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  11. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Great looking hammers JB!
     
  12. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    Now THAT'S a hammer.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  13. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    10 pound cross pein! No THAT will build your forearms! :D

    I figgered a gnarly buck dude like you would hang that on an 18" handle and one-hand it.
    ;)
     
  14. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    The only way I am one handing that is on a 6" handle!
     
  15. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
    6lb Hubbard spalling hammer on an 18" handle, 5lb Plumb spike maul on a 16" handle.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft Gold Member Gold Member

    691
    Nov 7, 2016
    [​IMG]
    My choice of hammer back in my construction days. Back when I swung one all day long, this was the best for me.
    I, after looking at this thread have a sudden interest in a vintage plumb hammer. I have never hung a hammer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2017
  17. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    The 20 oz. Estwing straight claw has been the mainstay of commerial form setters for decades. It's durable. I still have one. The steel neck is just less user friendly than a wood handle.

    Wood framers should stay away from steel handles. They often need to pull nails by prying sideways. This warps the steel necks.
     
  18. Woodcraft

    Woodcraft Gold Member Gold Member

    691
    Nov 7, 2016
    This one held up fine. I imagine this could be a problem. I however never once saw that happening though​. (The neck not coming back) I was involved in building homes from the groundwork to finish carpentry. We did it all. I was more involved with framing, siding, and roofing as I also had(still have) a CDL and also drove a dump truck for the company as well. So I was often busy during foundation and finish work .Bringing in sand, crushed stone, hauling out dirt, stones and stumps. Lol.
     
  19. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    552
    Mar 31, 2016
    jb i find a good forging hammer like that is most useful on a 24. with that kinda weight behind its almost a giant chisel instead of a spreader. i really like that head shape. i would email you about it but, like i said before. i couldnt afford it
     
  20. 300Six

    300Six

    Aug 29, 2013
    I have the same one. Says Safe-T-Shape on the other side (instead of wear safety goggles) and cost $12 (taxes incl) at Can Tire back in 1972. Hammer made more money for me than all of the university and college diplomas I have hanging on the wall.
     

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