A totally unscientific, unfair, biased test. BUT...

I'm going to break off-topic here for just a minute to say that Full Tang Clan is perhaps the best user-name I've seen since joining BFC. Well done, FTC!
smile.gif
 
I'll break off topic to say thank you very much.

It's a combination of my love for knives, and chop-socky Kung Fu movies (i.e. Wu-Tang Clan).

BTW: My first choice was "ptpalpha", but it was already taken!
wink.gif

 
Its like buying a Ducati and having to take the engine out of the frame or drop off the whole subframe just to check the valve clearances on the rear cylinder. Bought a TRX850 instead
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(way off topic)
 
There's something we can agree on. Full Tang Clan is way too cool a nick.

I also will re-state some modest support for Full Tang Clan. Out-of-box sharpness does not affect my buying decisions, since sharpness is one thing I can control, easily enough. However, it's a perfectly reasonable thing to bitch and moan about, and I do so often at the Benchmade forum, every chance I get. Yes, it can be argued that perhaps Benchmade is going for more robustness with those thicker edges, but if so, I still think they've gone too far.

Aside from being too thick, Benchmade edges can be touch-and-go, quality-wise. Sometimes they're incredibly well-done (aside from being too thick). Other times, the bevels on each side are very unevenly matched.

Joe
 
Ha, haa! Sorry, but the Ducati anology that popped into my head when FTC asked what those who don't know how to sharpen are to do was...that's right, what are you doing with a motorcycle if you don't know how to pump gas?
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There is no arguing that it is reasonable to expect a good edge on a $100 knife, but it just isn't that big a deal.
 
RE Steve's quote: "what are you doing with a motorcycle if you don't know how to pump gas?"

Answer: I'm paying waaaaay too much at the FULL-SERVICE pump!

BTW: I can't afford to buy a $300 Sebenza right now, let alone a Ducati! Meanwhile, I'm stuck with a dull BM 710 Axis, and my CBR 600 F2. For those of you who are lucky to have both a Ducati and Senbenza...damn I'm green with envy!
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P.S. I use "smilies" way too much.
 
I am happy to learn that there is a standard for knife edges, and it is 20 degreees. Personally I am never happy with factory edges. The first thing I do with most all of my knives is sharpen them. Only the Calypso ltwt is the only knife I have been happy with its edge. But i sure have been happy with the quality of alot of knives.
 
Full Tang Clan... you've made your point about BM's inconsistent final edge. I think your difficulty with those on this thread stems from the fact that most of us have learned to sharpen a knife to our own preference, and don't find your argument to be weighty in comparison with fit and finish and action and heat treat and true grind symmetry (not the edge symmetry) in a folder. We can fix the edge ourselves.

If you are serious about remedying your perceptions of edge problems on your knife or knives, you will eventually throw in the towel and learn how to sharpen your knives to your own personal preferences. That way, you can USE the knife to your heart's content and then renew the edge.

I think sharpening free-hand on a bench stone is the hardest way to learn.

Next best would be the Spyderco V-sharpener in my personal opinion. I own one just so serrations are easy to sharpen, which is where IMHO this device excels.

Easiest for knives of 5" and below is the Lansky or Gatco sharpeners, where the edge angle is controlled by a jig, and all you do is supply the elbow grease and practice a bit and you are on your way to a few choices of angle and of final edge polish/toothiness at opposite ends.

I like diamond stones. They can sharpen any of the modern CPM vanadium rich steels at any practical sharpness, and everything below. Others like traditional stones, but they require more work.

The book by Juranich called "The Razor Edge Book of Sharpening" is an easy read and describes the goals, the burr, the strop, the edge, and how to get these things. Recommended reading in accelerating your learning around sharpening.
 
Oops. Here I am at 154 and I finally double posted.

Full Tang Clan:

Well that's fine for you guys. But what about the rest of us who don't have the equipment, nor expertise, nor want to bother with having to re-sharpen the knife? Why should we have to invest in additional equipment, or pay a knifesmith to fix BM's problems?

Full Tang Clan... you've made your point about BM's inconsistent final edge. I think your difficulty with those on this thread stems from the fact that most of us have learned to sharpen a knife to our own preference, and don't find your argument to be weighty in comparison with fit and finish and action and heat treat and true grind symmetry (not the edge symmetry) in a folder. We can fix the edge ourselves. The other stuff is harder or impossible to fix.

If you are serious about remedying your perceptions of edge problems on your knife or knives, you will eventually throw in the towel and learn how to sharpen your knives to your own personal preferences. That way, you can actually USE the knife to cut stuff to your heart's content and then renew the edge.

I think sharpening free-hand on a bench stone is the hardest way to learn.

Next best would be the Spyderco V-sharpener in my personal opinion. I own one just so serrations are easy to sharpen, which is where IMHO this device excels.

Easiest for knives of 5" and below is the Lansky or Gatco sharpeners, where the edge angle is controlled by a jig, and all you do is supply the elbow grease and practice a bit and you are on your way to a few choices of angle and of final edge polish/toothiness at opposite ends.

I like diamond stones. They can sharpen any of the modern CPM vanadium rich steels at any practical sharpness, and everything below. Others like traditional stones, but they require more work.

The book by Juranich called "The Razor Edge Book of Sharpening" is an easy read and describes the goals, the burr, the strop, the edge, and how to get these things. Recommended reading in accelerating your learning around sharpening.

[This message has been edited by rdangerer (edited 08-08-2000).]
 
Once again, in the words of Judge Sheinlan, "You still don't get it!" Am I talking Greek here? What's going on with the comprehension problems?

I frankly don't give a hoot whether you or I, or anyone else in this forum can sharpen a blade until it can split a hair. That's not the point. I repeat -- THAT'S NOT THE POINT.

BOTTOM LINE: I pay Benchmade to put forth an effort to sharpen the knife to a REASONABLE level. They are not paying me; It's a consumer issue. Savvy?

Also, there is no law saying you have to sharpen your own knife. There are people own cars who can't tune them, people own houses who can't rewire the fusebox, people who wear shoes but can't resole them. It's a ridiculous argument.

I really think some of you guys are more interested in boasting about your knife sharpening abilities then addressing the problem at hand: that Benchmade does a sub-par sharpening job. Once again, go to the various threads in the general topics blade discussion forums dealing with BM. You will find a lot of dissatisfied people.

So next time you buy a pair of pants and one leg is longer than the other, don't complain about it's manufacturer defects or sub-standard work. Just fix it yourself!
 
P.S.

rdangerer,

I don't expect people to agree with me. I just ask that they understand the issue.

A few threads up is Joe Talmadge's reply. He says out-of-box sharpness is NOT an important feature for him, personally, as he can sharpen it to his taste. I respect his personal POV. However, he at leasts understands my POV:

"Out-of-box sharpness does not affect my buying decisions, since sharpness is one thing I can control, easily enough. However, it's a perfectly reasonable thing to bitch and moan about, and I do so often at the Benchmade forum, every chance I get. Yes, it can be argued that perhaps Benchmade is going for more robustness with those thicker edges, but if so, I still think they've gone too far."

He is not boasting about how sharp he can get his edges. He is saying that BM, like any other manufacturer of any other product has the responsibility to its customers to release the best product they can. Do they? That's what I'm getting at.
 
FTC how many BM knives do you have? Are you basing this qc problem on 1 knife? I have had a few BM knives and the edges were just as good as most other brands. Did I care for the edge, no but the quality of the knives are good. That in a nut shell is my take on it. Btw, I have also read many people who have actually sent their knives to BM for resharpening and they are very happy with the edges on the returned knife. Try sending it in before you bitch about it.
 
db,

My observation is based on the fact that there are MANY people at forums here, and at "knifeforums", who bitch about BM's edges. Many people even use the term QC problems.

Collectively, I figure we have more BM's than you.

 
Originally posted by rdangerer:
Full Tang Clan... you've made your point about BM's inconsistent final edge.

I'm pretty much done with this thread.


------------------
rdangerer@home.com
 
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