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Advice on making serrated edge

Discussion in 'Shop Talk - BladeSmith Questions and Answers' started by Fish30114, Sep 11, 2019 at 12:31 PM.

  1. Fish30114

    Fish30114 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 5, 2014
    I recently got a request for a Bread knife, and I have to admit in all these years, I've not made a serrated edge blade, so I am asking for advice on how to make a serrated edge, and also how to sharpen one.
    I would appreciate any info/advice

    Thanks--Don
     
  2. Backyard

    Backyard

    68
    Jul 19, 2019
    Chainsaw file
     
    Stelth likes this.
  3. Josh Rider

    Josh Rider KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Sep 2, 2014
    I’ve thought about using a checkering file on the edge before sanding final geometry, but have never tried it. You could probably use some needle files too.
     
  4. Fish30114

    Fish30114 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 5, 2014
    Just checking to see if anyone has more specific information, or recommendations
     
  5. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Use the Custom Search Engine nand search "making a serrated edge". You will find lots of threads where I and others tell how to do it with a chain saw file and a round brass rod.
     
  6. Fish30114

    Fish30114 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 5, 2014
    Thanks Stacy, I found something that way--appreciate that!
     
  7. coldsteelburns

    coldsteelburns

    Aug 2, 2010
    Depending on the size and shape you want them to be, you can also grind them in horizontally on a small wheel attachment. The 1/4" "wheel" might work nicely. I've seen larger serrations ground this way and have also played around with it myself in the past on some bin knives.

    Or you can also use a small drum sander on a dremel if you have a decent amount of sanding sleeves to use.

    Edit to add: Check out "Veff serrations" for a few examples of the serration type I'm talking about.

    ~Paul
    My Youtube Channel
    ... (Just some older videos of some knives I've made in the past)

     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019 at 6:25 PM
  8. Pinoy Knife

    Pinoy Knife

    968
    Aug 9, 2002
    ok this will sound Crazy but try putting a couple of o rings on your wheel, place the belt on the wheel and cut. this gives you a method of stepping the serrations over to the next set in the blade you are making. there are very expensive/labor involved ways of doing this but sometimes Simple just works..
     
  9. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    Even on the thinnest belt I know of that wouldn't work. Have you tried it?
     
    Backyard likes this.
  10. E.Carlson

    E.Carlson KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    685
    Mar 28, 2016
    20190302_174912-1209x1209.jpg 20190303_094334-1209x1209.jpg It got the job done.
     
    Branson1369 likes this.
  11. E.Carlson and Backyard like this.
  12. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    That is why I used a single file and a brass rod. Each tooth is cut separately, but the spacing is kept perfect.
     
    JG Custom Metal Works likes this.
  13. Natlek

    Natlek

    Jun 9, 2015
    + one rod in same size + file jig and job is done in 15 minutes ............
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019 at 8:39 AM
  14. I wonder if you could file in small serrations with a checkering file. The kind a lot of makers use for jimping. Like a 20LPI file. Maybe even a 30 or 40 LPI(lines per inch) file. I wonder if it could make tiny little serrations like Spyderco does.

    You’d need to have the bevels ground first probably. It would be awesome if they made a super hard checkering file that would allow cutting the little serrations in after heat treat...
     
  15. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    I use checkering files from time to time for some tasks, but don't think it would work here. Using one on a hardened blade would quickly ruin a $40-50 file. I think the pattern would be too fine, anyway.

    While thinking about this, I had a thought ( dangerous situation). I haven't tried it but might just for fun. I thought of the possibility of making a 1/2" or 3/4' wide belt in 100 grit ceramic (slit a 1" belt in half) . Put it on the grinder at medium speed and using a piece of .050" carbide and some sort of clamped guide, wear away the grit in a thin .050" line. Repeat about .050" away, etc. You will create a belt that cuts grooves. Use it on the hardened blade once the bevel is ground to a sharp edge. Hopefully, this will serrate it.

    OK, this made me think of an alternative to the expensive diamond wheel. Buy a box of 1.25"abrasive cut- off discs. Assemble five or six on a mandrel with 1" cut-off discs between them as spacer washers. Use this to cut the serrations in the pre-HT blade, and clean it up after HT. The ones I use at work are Dedeco 1.25X.032" and come in a box of 100 for $35. I would think that chucking the mandrel in a lathe would be best.
     
    Backyard likes this.
  16. E.Carlson

    E.Carlson KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    685
    Mar 28, 2016
    Yeah, that was a test on a junk blade to see if it would survive HT.
    I did better on the final piece but the spacing got a bit out of whack.
    20190308_145842-1209x1209.jpg
     
    jwccustom57 likes this.
  17. coldsteelburns

    coldsteelburns

    Aug 2, 2010
    Here is an example of what I was talking about, and where I originally got the idea to try it from:



    I believe Mick is using a 5/8" wheel in the video, so you could even use all the way down to a 1/4" wheel if you wanted to go smaller.

    Just one other way of going about it.


    ~Paul
    My Youtube Channel
    ... (Just some older videos of some knives I've made in the past)
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019 at 1:15 AM
    E.Carlson, Josh Rider and Backyard like this.
  18. Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

    Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith ilmarinen - MODERATOR Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 20, 2004
    I do that on things like bread knives, and occasionally on a camp knife. I think most folks call that a scalloped edge, not a serrated edge. It does get wicked sharp and is easily touched up after HT or done completely after HT. Re-sharpening is also pretty easy.
     
  19. Josh Rider

    Josh Rider KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Sep 2, 2014
    That’s a cool idea! Thanks for sharing it.
     
    coldsteelburns likes this.
  20. Pinoy Knife

    Pinoy Knife

    968
    Aug 9, 2002
    yes it worked pretty well . not perfect but with the rings under the super flex belt it does let you put even spaced grooves in.
     

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