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Another RenWax vs Camellia oil thread

Discussion in 'Custom & Handmade Knives' started by Balislinger, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. Balislinger

    Balislinger Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 11, 2003
    I have a question for you more experienced collectors. I deal often with custom balisong knives. In addition to the blade, they have the pivots, two channels running down the sides of the handles, and in some cases a skeletonized pattern with countersunk holes in the handles. Let's take the example of a fully stainless-steel balisong with skeletonized stainless steel handles and a stainless blade. What would you use, camellia oil or RenWax, and how would you apply it? I just got a bottle of camellia oil, and thinking about which applications I may want to try switching over for. Thanks
     
  2. Kevin Jones

    Kevin Jones Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Oct 28, 2006
    I use both RenWax and camellia oil and recommend both.
    However the specific item I'm trying to protect will determine which I use.

    If a blade and/or handle material is smooth and one I will handle often then I will use RenWax. If the handle is rough (stag/bark ivory for example) then I use camellia oil to guard against build up of the RenWax in areas where I can't buff it as well. RenWax recommends you apply it sparingly then buff it lightly as the residue is what you want to remain not dried wax. And it does dry quickly.

    I also feel more comfortable using camellia oil on items that I feel are more susceptible to problems as I can see that protection where if used correctly you can't see the RenWax protection. I know when the piece needs a new application of oil however don't when or if it needs another application of Ren. I like the sheen and look both protectants provide.

    Another thing I've found is that on most damascus steels RenWax will leave a very pleasing luster, however I have found on a couple pieces that it will leave a hazy look or film. I don't know why this is. Perhaps it's the specific steel make-up? So I would recommend testing a small area of your damascus blades before using RenWax on them the first time.

    I have heard some say that cameilla oil is just over priced mineral oil. I have not found this to be true. As cameilla oil doesn't evaporate as fast, doesn't attract dust/dirt as bad and imo leaves a more pleasing sheen.

    Hope this helps.

    Edited to add; Use both very sparingly as a very little goes a long way. I will place one drop of cameilla oil on each side of a 7"-9" blade and then spread if evenly with my finger (be careful) over the entire blade. On a hunter or folder blade I will still use one drop however be removing most of it as I spread it evenly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
  3. RogerP

    RogerP Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 28, 2002
    Other than the odd slipjoint I don't really collect folders, so I can't help you there.

    For storage I prefer Camelia oil. I've just had really good success with it over a really long period of time. Application and re-application is close to zero effort. I use Camelia for the blades and regular mineral oil for the handles - which I immerse for 24 hrs, twice a year.

    For protection of knives that are going to be displayed or handled - such as at a show - I would coat up with Renwax.

    Roger
     
  4. JParanee

    JParanee Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    Sentry Solutions tuff glide lubes, protects and has proven itself to me from Alaska to Africa. I use it on all my guns and knives
     
  5. Balislinger

    Balislinger Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 11, 2003
    Thanks guys! So what would you use on a skeletonized balisong with the countersunk holes in the handles? Maybe RenWax on the blade and oil on the handles (wax could build up in the countersinking)?

    Joe, I think Tuff glide is a great product. My understanding is that the formula contains both mineral spirits (a strong solvent) and silicone. I would use it too in the field, especially if travelling, but for collector grade safe queens in storage I would be concerned about the effect of the silicone, as it tends to react with other substances, and on putting a solvent on some materials.
     
  6. Karl B. Andersen

    Karl B. Andersen

    Jul 27, 2003
    I'm compelled to throw this in here - to date, I have found nothing more effective at rust protection than Eezox products.
    I am sure my shop is far more corrosive than where most of my knives are destined, and rust is a thing of the past around here!

    http://www.eezox.com/knife-care.html
     
  7. r connally

    r connally

    798
    Jan 26, 2008
    My routine is pretty much like Rogers. I put a heavy coat of mineral oil on natural handles twice a year and let them sit for 24 hours then do a wipe down. I use camelia oil on my blades and go over them every three months or so.

    I also monitor the humidity in the room where my knives are stored/displayed (got that from reading Kevin's posts over the years). I run a room humidifier during winter months to keep the air moisture up. When the skin on your ankles starts to get dry from forced air heating, it's beyond time to crank up the humidifier :D

    I only have one butterfly knife and I do flip it. It has stainless handles so I use camelia oil on the blade and do not oil the handles. I just wipe them down with a clean cotton rag. If you use your butterfly knife, oil on the handles would scare me :eek:
     
  8. r connally

    r connally

    798
    Jan 26, 2008
    Karl, thanks for posting the link to eezox. I read through all of the tabs on the site and, even though I can't figure out what's in it, sounds like it really works well on knives and firearms.

    I never heard of this product before. Will give it a try. Anyone else have experience with it? I'll contact them to see if it's safe to use on Robar teflon coatings.
     
  9. Jon Brand

    Jon Brand Gold Member Gold Member

    May 28, 2007
    This might be a weird response but over the years I have found that there is no need to treat a fully stainless knife. The wax can end up leaving the handle with odd shades of color. I really don't think stainless steel needs it. On all my knives I use camellia oil, or tuff cloth (which I think Joe was reffering to?). I have ren wax but find that it discolors almost everything I put it on and leaves a hazy dull look. I much prefer oil. If a knife is a user I might add some wax to the blade here and then.
     
  10. Kevin Jones

    Kevin Jones Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Oct 28, 2006
    ^Jon you may be applying too much RenWax and/or letting it dry on the blades before lightly buffing it. Or as I said in my previously post, I have found it problematic (leaves haze) on a few damascus steels.

    I use some of the hard core rust inhibitors such as Ballistol (it's good) for fishing equipment, knives and firearms that are going to be exposed to the elements, however I have found some of them to be sticky/gummy and instantly turn a displayed knife into a dust/dirt magnet. Yuk :(
     
  11. Karl B. Andersen

    Karl B. Andersen

    Jul 27, 2003
    You are welcome. One of the reasons I like it so much is that it dries to the touch and does not collect dust and dirt like a magnet.;)
     
  12. Kevin Jones

    Kevin Jones Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Oct 28, 2006
    I was just looking at the website. Looks like a good product.
    I assume it leaves a nice looking finish on the knives as opposed to dulling as your show table knives always look really good.
     
  13. JParanee

    JParanee Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    I dont know maybe . but i have been useing it for long term storage of very high end Japanese swords and have had no problems what so ever.

    I do like ren wax and use it on most display blades . But for burying a blade in storage and not useing it tuff glide has been very good to me. In the field it has really been great
     
  14. Balislinger

    Balislinger Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 11, 2003
    I was just noticing on the Eezox FAQ that they recommend it's use on any metal, but it may not be appropriate for other materials. For example, they advise against using it on urethane-coated wood stocks. Since some knife handle materials are urethane coated, including some stabilized woods, the Eezox might be best for only the metal parts. I don't know that I would trust it on natural handle materials either. Seems like a great product, but I sort of prefer a product I can get on any part of the knife and not have to worry about its effects. Nice thing about RenWax and Camellia oil is they can go on just about anything.
     
  15. Bruce Bump

    Bruce Bump KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 2, 1999
    Karl, I went ahead and ordered some Eezox on your recommendation. Thanks Man, I hope you're right. :D
     
  16. Win Heger

    Win Heger Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 29, 2000
    I use Renwax exclusively and have had no problems on Stainless or Carbon Steel blades. For a your purposes I would use the Renwax very sparingly and wipe it off almost immediately.

    I had a Ti handled (bright purple), Stainless Steel stiletto from the '90s that I treated with Renwax, after years it was still perfect, showed no discoloring. Some of my Carbon knives by Jimmy Fikes are also perfect and a couple are from the '90s.

    I'm going to pick up some Camelia Oil for Stag and Sheephorn. Good advise, Kevin.

    Win
     
  17. A C Richards

    A C Richards KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Apr 14, 2006
    I use camellia oil. I prefer non petroleum based products. No I am not into green but I just don't like the smell.

    Kevin, I can assure you that camellia oil is not mineral oil. It comes from the camellia plant and another name for it is Tea Seed Oil. It is expensive, $45/gallon wholesale. I found an importer that I purchased a large quantity of it from. I have a few gallons left. The oil I have is a bit thicker than the bottles I have gotten at the knife-shows with the Japanese writing on it. So I am not sure what is in those bottles. I know what I have is pure camellia oil and some I have is even ORGANIC. I have even used it for cooking which is what it is made for. It is much more stable than most vegetable oils and has the highest smoke point out of all of them.
     
  18. RogerP

    RogerP Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 28, 2002
    Good info Chuck.

    Roger
     
  19. 2knife

    2knife

    Mar 13, 2002
    On Mineral oil and camellia oil, there may be no marked difference. What is sold as camellia oil is mostly paraffin wax, around 97%. Thats what i was told by a MS bladesmith who works in Japanese swords and kitchen cutlery.
    - maybe there's more varieties of this, in different concentrations, on the market. (?)
    David
     
  20. 2knife

    2knife

    Mar 13, 2002
    A good idea for a Blade Show seminar might be on metal products and applications. The best writeup ive seen was an old Blade article where Wayne Goddard tested many product in side-by-side testing. I cant remember the date or year of this, if anyone knows..? One of the products tested was wd-40, against others.. many tests, weathering, salt water exposure, etc..
     

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