Recommendation? Choosing a new hunting knife

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Mountaindog, Nov 15, 2020.

  1. Mountaindog

    Mountaindog

    27
    Nov 9, 2020
    I have wondered if the Benchmade Steep Country might feel a little small for larger game like elk?
     
  2. Velitrius

    Velitrius Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2000
    Nope, it's plenty. Only complaints I've had with hunting knives over the years is that they felt too big.

    The White River Backpacker Pro is plenty for an elk, and would be a fantastic choice out of the ones in your OP.

    I currently use the Sendero Pack knife designed by Jerry Fisk. White River makes a great knife.

    3 inches is really all you need. I tell the wife this often enough, so I might as well tell you too.

    Get the Backpacker Pro with the orange scales in case you "set it down" in the shiggy.
     
    DMG likes this.
  3. GatorFlash1

    GatorFlash1 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 28, 2012
    Here is one designed by a famous knife maker Bill Moran, and produced by Spyderco that I have carried for years while hunting. It is not too big or clunky.

    And here is a new one that recently released designed by a famous knife maker Phil Wilson and made by Spyderco. They will both do any field dressing job from large to small game and they don't break the bank.



     
    Alberta Ed likes this.
  4. Mountaindog

    Mountaindog

    27
    Nov 9, 2020
    Thanks! I have aways used a 4 inch blade and never felt it was too big or too small. My dad always carried a smaller knife...Although I dont remember the last time he got his hands bloody...Thats what I'm for I guess.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2020
  5. Mountaindog

    Mountaindog

    27
    Nov 9, 2020
    The Bow River has been on my need to buy list for sometime. Seems like its always out of stock. Found it in stock today so I ordered one along with two others for gifts. I think it will work well for breasting out/cleaning birds and other light tasks when I might normally just grab a fillet knife. That said I'm still going to get a more robust hunting knife in a premium steel. You have all been very helpful! Might wait a week and see if any black friday/cyber Monday sales tip the scales for me. There are obviously many good options!
     
  6. NapalmCheese

    NapalmCheese Basic Member Basic Member

    514
    Aug 24, 2006
    While this is off topic I also like a saw for quartering.

    Take the shoulders off, tenderloins out, backstraps out, use the saw to take the ribs off, saw to remove the spine from the from the pelvis, and the saw to cut the pelvis in two. Take it home and butcher the rest of it. If I need to pack it out I'll bone it, not quarter it. To each their own.

    As for the OP, I have a drop point 110 that I like using very much but that's a folder. In fixed blades I've always wanted to try out a Grohmann knife, they look like a great all around hunting knife.
     
    RipD likes this.
  7. RLB0414

    RLB0414

    47
    Apr 1, 2014
    Check out Knives of Alaska. I have a couple that I enjoy
     
  8. Alberta Ed

    Alberta Ed

    Jun 29, 1999
    Grohmann's D.H. Russell Canadian Belt Knife is an excellent all-round hunting knife. I used mine to field dress my first mule deer and still have it 40+ years later. I prefer their high carbon steel, pretty close to 1080. That offset blade makes it handy for food prep, too. The only complaint, and it's more of an observation, is that the rosewood handle gets slippery when covered with fat/blood etc.
     
    jfk1110 likes this.
  9. Velitrius

    Velitrius Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2000
    The D.H. Russell's are indeed great hunting knives. Had one for years until I gave it away here on this forum not long ago.

    I never had an issue with the handle being slippery with blood and such. I've used many knives with smooth handles like this, never an issue.

    This is not to say that I haven't heard people mention it as an issue, I'm sure it could be. But the rosewood on the Russell never bothered me.
     
    jfk1110 likes this.
  10. Mountaindog

    Mountaindog

    27
    Nov 9, 2020
    Well...here are my thoughts...As I mentioned in an earlier post I ordered a Spiderco Bow River. I think it will be great for smaller more delicate tasks. Should hold a fair edge and be easy to touch up. Its also cheap enough that I won't feel bad carrying it and using it as I please.

    I got my hands on an Alaskan Guide Vanguard in s30v...I really liked the way it felt. If it weren't for my fascination with 3V, I would get the Vanguard in s30v.

    I came here looking for one knife and I'm going to end up with three. I'm going to pick up a Bucklite Max II (probably the smaller one). It looks very similar to the Vanguard with a thinner blade (which I actually prefer). You all have convinced me that Bucks 420 is likley a good step up from what I'm used to and in reality would probably do what I need. I'm not out much if I don't like it and it will make a good backup for a 3V blade.

    I'm also going to buy either the Benchmade Puukko or the Cold Steel Master Hunter. Likley the puukko as I can get it for a good deal using a gift card. However, I would jump on a Master Hunter for the right price. I just feel that 3V hits the sweet spot of edge retention (especially when coming in contact with bone) and ease of edge maintenance based off what I have learned from ya all and other reading. Time and experience will tell I guess. Its always possible to sell a knife and try again. I suspect some of ya might tell me thats what the fun is all about.

    If anyone sees any great error in my thinking I'm all ears.

    Thanks again for all the suggestions!
     
    skyhorse, sodak and jfk1110 like this.
  11. sodak

    sodak Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 26, 2004
    Sounds like you’ve thought it through pretty well and have done your research. Good luck, I’m interested to know how it works out for you!
     
  12. Velitrius

    Velitrius Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 3, 2000
    I have the small Bucklite Max and can say unequivocally that it is a fine choice. It's light, ergonomic, easy to maintain and insanely affordable.

    You'll probably do like me in the future and buy a bunch for people around you.

    This has been a fun thread. Neat to see folks digging through the piles of recommendations and finding something cool.
     

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