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Photos Coarse edges!

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by miso2, Mar 17, 2018.

  1. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hi all,

    I admire beautiful polished edges and like the picture thread of course.

    But I love coarse edges, too.
    A nice scratch pattern makes the knife look sharp!

    [​IMG]


    Unfortunately, we do not have a picture thread for them (or at least I cannot find one).
    So here it is.

    Please show your knives with nice coarse edges.
    I am sure that it is much more difficult to take good pictures of them than for polished edges.
    Show your prowess in photography!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. FOG2

    FOG2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    There is a thread on the subject but I don't remember the title. I'll add a pic of my 10 in Mundail later that I Use daily as a cook. I started sharpening with progressively coarser grits and am now at 320 and it performs wonderfully while staying user sharp longer than it did at 600 and higher.
    I should go even coarser and see how that works.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  3. Beansandcarrots

    Beansandcarrots

    373
    Apr 15, 2014
    Gonna edit this post with a few pics. I have a couple good ones, and one hilarious one. Wait til you see my Tenacious. Anyway, I'm not at home right now so I'll get back here as soon as I am
     
    FortyTwoBlades and miso2 like this.
  4. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    FOG2, let me know if you remember the title of the thread. I will put a link to it.

    I totally agree with you about the benefits of coarse edges.
    I used to chase up to higher grits for high polish and still occasionally do so, but sharpen most of my knives, including kitchen knives, at coarser grits lately.

    The first pic in the original post shows Spydiechef sharpened at 320. Works great, last long, and easily maintained.
    The second one is sharpened at 240.
    They are lightly and minimally stropped with 1 micron diamond suspension for final deburring, though.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  5. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    Umnumzaan sharpened at 320.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2018
  6. FOG2

    FOG2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    As I remember it was titled ... Who has gone to the world of ? I can't remember the rest... To course maybe?
    Im surprised no one else has chimed in.
     
  7. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I'm glad you gents are discovering this area of sharpening. With this conclusion. These bevels look to be from a coarse diamond. I think others sharpen at this level they just haven't posted. DM
     
    Chris "Anagarika" likes this.
  8. jpm2

    jpm2

    Nov 19, 2014
    Timely thread. Here's my Sage1 fresh off a Norton jb8 coarse side (in the background).
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2018
  9. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    Yes. I know that there are people who like and use coarse edges.
    That is exactly the reason I created this thread.

    I use coarse diamond stones for reprofiling/bevel setting, but the bevels shown were done with silicon carbide stones from Congress Tools.
     
  10. FOG2

    FOG2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    I use sandpaper to sharpen mine. I have made a number of knives from files using minimal tools. A 1x30 harbor freight,drill press and.......Sandpaper, so I'm comfortable with it and it works fer me (shrug)
     
  11. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    Very nice!
    Is it like #120?
     
  12. jpm2

    jpm2

    Nov 19, 2014
    I'm just the opposite. Silicon carbide to hog off metal, diamond for finishing.

    Some say 100, some 120. Grit is hard to pin down. It seems each manufacturer uses different standards.
     
    Chris "Anagarika" likes this.
  13. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    Interesting.
    Would you mind sharing the reasoning behind it?
     
    Chris "Anagarika" likes this.
  14. jpm2

    jpm2

    Nov 19, 2014
    If I use enough force on the diamond plates to take metal off as fast as I can with the SiC stones, it'll damage them.
    Also, and I know this is controversial, I get better edges off the diamond. Not necessarily sharper ones, but more durable and longer lasting with high carbide steels.
    Also, diamonds cut the better than anything else, with the least amount of force. I find this important to reduce burring during the finish stage.
     
  15. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    I generally advise against diamond on the coarse end unless you're using it on something like stone or glass for the reason jpm2 mentioned above. Silicon carbide and even aluminum oxide are hard enough to cut any steel at the lower grit range because it's just scooping out the carbides along with the steel.

    I'm running most of my kitchen knives at around 120 grit these days off my Bull Thistle ruby stones. Gives a nice toothy edge with less tendency to form a ragged burr than most coarse abrasives and without the apex-blunting effects of soft slurry-forming stones.
     
  16. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Chris, that's the one.
    My experience echos jpm & 42. There are several prongs in this fork: 1) I think the x coarse diamond cuts fast. Real close to the coarse SiC on my JUM-3 (120 grit, I'll call it) so what if I'm wrong, the numbers mean little when were talking eating metal. The diamond Maybe a little faster.
    If were comparing the ACE Hardware stone, coarse side, it works noticeable faster. You can use pressure w/ the SiC, with the diamond you can't. 2) The ACE stone or the JUM-3 Norton offers greater economy. 3) I don't get noticeable gouges in the bevel (as bad w/ the JUM-3) as with the x coarse diamond. The ACE stone's tail is real close to the x coarse diamond. This is for initial bevel setting. I'll work thru a couple finer
    grits and finish off on the fine diamond.
    I know we obsess over scratches left in the steel as we are a sub-culture in knives. In reality I try to frost them over w/ the next grits but I've never had one complaint if a few were left visible from a customer. They just want it sharp. DM
     
  17. FOG2

    FOG2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 1, 2007
    120 for kitchen knives? I do need try it.
     
    jpm2 likes this.
  18. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    Here's a few that were recently done, all freehand. The pics aren't that great and I don't worry much about cosmetics on edges, but when it comes to coarse edges, I love using them, IMO they are the best all-around for performance and durability.

    Schrade folders sharpened at 120 grit on coarse Norton Crystolon
    [​IMG]
    Kershaw Link M390 done on DMT C (325)
    [​IMG]
    Kershaw Rexford done on Crystolon fine (280)
    [​IMG]
    Charlie Mike Elmax done on DMT C
    [​IMG]
     
  19. miso2

    miso2 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 19, 2014
    Very nice!
    How do you like #120 edges?
     

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