Convex edges are not stronger than v edge

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by PlumasDePan, Feb 24, 2021.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. PlumasDePan

    PlumasDePan

    40
    Jul 21, 2020
    Hi sorry to everyone that reads this post... i was confused about something but got corrected...

    Please if mod, remove the post
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2021
  2. wackafew

    wackafew Gold Member Gold Member

    728
    Sep 23, 2008
    ok
     
  3. co556guy

    co556guy

    Dec 13, 2011
    This is going to be fun.
     
    AntDog, Mecha and Natlek like this.
  4. kingston73

    kingston73 Gold Member Gold Member

    900
    Oct 14, 2013
    Here I was thinking I was somewhat intelligent. This is way beyond me...
     
  5. shinbone

    shinbone

    88
    Dec 13, 2005
    That is the whole point of a convex edge: to get better cutting with a V-edge, you to go to a smaller angle, and thus a weaker edge, than a convex edge.
     
  6. Richard338

    Richard338 Gold Member Gold Member

    May 3, 2005
    Your construction is unrealistic.
    In your first figure you drew the flat grind outside of the convex, but could have drawn it inside, meeting only at the edge and the spine.
    Beginning the grind, in practice you have a fixed thickness of stock. You start by flat grinding. At some stage you make a choice. You can convex to a zero edge, or continue flat grinding until close to zero, but then usually put in a secondary bevel, which you didn't consider.
     
  7. Mecha

    Mecha Titanium Bladesmith Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Dec 27, 2013
    marcinek and craytab like this.
  8. LEGION 12

    LEGION 12 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 8, 2009
    Lol ...
     
    AntDog and Mecha like this.
  9. Silent H

    Silent H

    Feb 1, 2018
    So you get better performance from a knife with less steel, if that knife is convex ground? Sounds like that knife is stronger.

    It's hard to tell, because you never really define "Strong"
     
    Mecha likes this.
  10. unwisefool

    unwisefool Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 22, 2007
    I don't think your little lines are right. I'm not a maths expert, but I used to date a teacher.
     
  11. Frailer

    Frailer Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 25, 2009
    Take your first graph and zoom all the way in, centered on the origin of the Cartesian plane. It will make sense then.
     
  12. unwisefool

    unwisefool Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 22, 2007
    ...now you are just making things up...
     
  13. BITEME

    BITEME Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 14, 2007
    I was going to say.....nah forget it,you can believe whatever you want
     
  14. Cougar Allen

    Cougar Allen Buccaneer (ret.) Gold Member

    Oct 9, 1998
    You have chosen to draw a convex grind that is thinner at every point than the V grind you have chosen to draw, thus demonstrating the possibility that one convex grind could be weaker than one V grind at all points. However, that is not how people in the real world do convex grinds and V grinds.
     
    Mecha and AntDog like this.
  15. JAB

    JAB Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 13, 2005
    E1609128-17C5-46F3-BB89-BDB8F350FEA9.jpeg
     
    unwisefool, Danke42 and Mecha like this.
  16. `br4dz-

    `br4dz- Gold Member Gold Member

    978
    Jan 18, 2016
    Fake news
     
  17. bdmicarta

    bdmicarta Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 16, 2012
    I was going to say "frustrating".
     
  18. MolokaiRider

    MolokaiRider Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 13, 2017
    A Hamaguri grind is full height convex, as opposed to a convex grind which is in relation to the edge.


    I just wanted to type Hamaguri.


    Also, the OP would only be correct if the flat grind was at an incredibly high angle, which is not great for knives.
     
    jbmonkey and jfk1110 like this.
  19. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    “Look gaiz! A splitting maul is stronger than a convex ground knife”. :rolleyes:
     
  20. crg031

    crg031 Gold Member Gold Member

    260
    Jan 6, 2013
    A swing and a miss. I’m quite good at math and physics (masters in mechanical engineering).

    This explanation makes very little sense.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2021
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page