CoyotesThriving under our noses

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If you're into science and nature, sign up for these people's email newsletter. It's always got interesting stuff in it.

http://www.world-science.net/othernews/060105_coyotefrm.htm

I just thought I'd share this because I found it so interesting. I see coyotes all the time where I work on the eastern edge of Denver, since I lock up at night and the area is just filthy with rabbits. I've actually had them run right up to me and stand about 12 feet away. I once told that to a woman at work and she goes, "Weren't you scared?" It never occured to me for a minute that I might be in danger. There are VERY few animals on the planet that will go out of their way to hurt you.

.
 
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I see coyotes on The Cape all the time. This isn't news to me!!
 
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No surprise here, I live in a southwest burb of Chicago and have seen coyotes several times first thing in the morning on my way to work. I have had clients report their pets being attacked and killed by yotes in their back yards! I've also seen red fox, turkeys, and of course... deer in places where you would never think they could live. Very adaptable animals.
 
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When there are a lot of rabbits in an area there will be a lot of coyotes.
Greg
 

Arthur Washburn

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These people just noticed this stuff? Animals are way more adaptable that most of the tree hugging, left wing socialists would care to admit. It might interupt their crusade to save the world from humans. :rolleyes:
 

Planterz

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I see coyotes all the time around town here. I'm talking about fair sized city, in a regular neighborhood, in the middle of town. I laugh (cynically, not wickedly) at signs posted at street corners for lost cats and small dogs. Chances are, Fluffy and Whiskers are coyote food.

I haven't seen any javalenas yet (wild pigs), but I smell them all the time.
 
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While I have only seen one for certain in my neighbourhood, I hear them almost every night. I have mentioned it to one neighbour who lets her 6lb Pomeranian out alone every night, but maybe she's hoping it will become lunch for a few of them! One thing a lot of hunter friends have said around my parts is they are encountering big cats( or evidence of) on a somewhat frequent basis.No surprise as predators will follow game and there are more deer around than I can ever remember. I'm in the Maritimes,BTW.
 
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Planterz said:
I see coyotes all the time around town here. I'm talking about fair sized city, in a regular neighborhood, in the middle of town. I laugh (cynically, not wickedly) at signs posted at street corners for lost cats and small dogs. Chances are, Fluffy and Whiskers are coyote food.

I haven't seen any javalenas yet (wild pigs), but I smell them all the time.

You should remember a news paper story a while back where a guy moved to Tucson from back east. He let his cat out and the coyotes ate it and he tried to sue BLM for the cost of shipping the cat out. He lost his case and then suggested to BLM that maybe they should feed the coyotes so they don’t eat pets.:rolleyes:

I have a pack of about 12 javalenas that come by every few days at night, seem they have a route they follow. They dont mess with anything just make alot of noise when they go by
 
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Coyotes no danger to people ? I know one man who was treed by coyotes . Saved when some armed people arrived. To see what wolves REALLY do read the following , in particular the criteria for a 'wolf attack' !! www.natureswolves.com
 
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Mete,

Will all due respect, I have great doubts about the man you know being treed by coyotes. I have no doubts at all that this is how he reported it to you, but I think he was either treed by a feral dog pack or is exaggerating the situation or was overly fearful.

I have lived and played and worked near coyote populations my entire adult life. Often alone, at night, in remote areas. Not once have I been endangered by them, nor do I know, in a wide circle of fellow outdoorsman, anyone who ever has been endandered by them. I know one man, my brother in law, who was "charged" by a coyote, but he easily killed it. Feral dog packs are , of course, a considerably more dangerous animal threat to men and livestock than wolves, or coyotes.

I personally think it is a good thing when native coyotes, just doing their intellegently designed thing, kill and eat people's free roaming cats, a damaging and invasive species. Cats are fine, inside. Coyotes are fine outside.

Take Care,
Jeff
 
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gallowglass said:
Mete,

Will all due respect, I have great doubts about the man you know being treed by coyotes. I have no doubts at all that this is how he reported it to you, but I think he was either treed by a feral dog pack or is exaggerating the situation or was overly fearful.

...............
Take Care,
Jeff

They will attack smaller humans if hungry. A few years ago over the mountain from me a 12 year old girl was attacked by a coyote walking home from school. She was able to get loose with the help of a homeowner that saw the problem but it shredded her arm pretty good.

Back in the late 80's in CA, they started to build yuppie villas way out in eastern San Diego county and there were many cases of coyotes attacking babies. One was dragging a baby and it's carrier down a slope(when discovered) across the street from the house he'd taken if off the porch of, while the parent was getting a drink of water.

The baby suffered some deep puncture wounds to either side of it's skull where the coyote was holding while dragging it, but recovered OK IIRC.

They used to come into my yard at night looking to eat my cats and I started killing them. They don't come around much anymore.

There have been many cases of rabid coyotes attacking adults too, so if you see one behaving unnaturally friendly(also a sign of early rabies)shoot it, in fact shoot all you can anyway, or get away from it.

They are not like dogs at all and will eat your dogs, your cats, your children, or anything they can get away with eating. They are not your friend.

There are more now, thanks to the tree huggers, than before Columbus landed in the islands. Their territory has expanded to places they have never been in since we started recording such things.
 

yam

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We live in a rural area on 6 1/2 acres and over the years I have dispatched many coyotes. The problem is, the coyotes have nothing eating them. They breed, kill livestock which cost the owners money, kill pets, damage vehicles when they get hit and/or cause accidents. And yes, they are a threat to small children. People have posted pictures at the local feed store of full size cattle having been killed by coyotes that have packed up. There have even been pictures of coyotes attacking and eating calves that were still half way in their mothers not completely birthed along with killing the mother. So, the owners get dinged twice. They lose their cow and a calf that was probably going to market. And that's just cattle, you also have sheep, goats, pigs, chickens, ducks, etc, etc, etc.

This is not a Disney cartoon or wildlife special where people can ooh and ahh them. It's real life where coyotes kill and cause damage. Same with raccoons, they went through 30 of our chickens in 2-3 nights before I was finally able to kill them. And yes, they were in their hen house and the gates and doors were latched. The raccoons got in anyhow.

Anyhow, to anyone who thinks they are cute, harmless little creatures ...... wait until it effects your wallet or kills your favorite dog or cat and you'll change your tune.
 
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Yam,

A few years ago I was killing ten-fifteen racoons a week for a fish hatchery outside of Rifle, CO, and I've killed a lot more coyotes than I can remember over several thousand acres of ranch and range. Shot them for livestock protection, shot and then ate part of one on a dare ( stringy) , shot them for varmit practice, shot them for hides.

I shoot feral cats too, for good enviromental management reasons. I shoot feral dogs for safety reasons.

This isn't a Disney cartoon or wildlife special, but it shouldn't be an rural legend spawning ground either.

No one denies that coyotes eat wildlife and loose pets and livestock, although most of the "coyote kills" on livestock I've worked have actually been dogs, particularly concerning pigs and full grown cows. Anyone choosing a coyote or three over a pig in a fight has never worked a lot with pigs.

I'd always hear "coyotes mauled my horse" or "coyotes stole my pigmy goat" and it would mostly be the neighbor down the road's dog. I do know a women who's jack russel terrier , off the leash on her own property, got carried off by a coyote right in front of her. The dog's name : "Jelly".

I don't think that anyone would deny that a coyote could or would take a child. They are wild canines. But by the same token coyotes are not a threat to adults, armed or unarmed. A rabid coyote is a different story, but anything rabid is dangerous. I've never seen a rabid coyote but know that they are fairly common.

The spread of the coyote doesn't have much to do with the "treehuggers", but with the decline of the wolf and the cougar. Wolves were the primary predator of the coyote, followed by the cougar.

Do a little research outside the feedstore and you'll change your tune.

Take Care,
Jeff
 

yam

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I did not believe many of these stories either. However, they have been confirmed by our large animal veterinarian as well. But I'm not here to argue either, around here it's not rural legend, it's rural fact. I live on an island and the coyote population is quite large with no place for them to go. Consequently, they have become rather emboldened. They do pack up around here and people know it. They have and do take large animals. Yes, pigs are tough once they get old enough and large enough.

But here's another rural truth around here. Eagles have made off with small dogs while people have been walking on the beach.

That's ok that you think I'm spreading rural legends, that's your opinion and your more than welcome to have it. But come spend a few years where I live and maybe you'll change your tune.
 
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BTW coyotes in the NE are much larger than those in the SW.70 lbs is not unusual ! They hunt small game alone and large game in groups.
 
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mete said:
BTW coyotes in the NE are much larger than those in the SW.70 lbs is not unusual ! They hunt small game alone and large game in groups.


That would be big, I would guess most I have seen are 50 pounds and under.
 
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Yam, Aye! I believe what you say. I've seen fish and game films of coyotes attacking the ever smaller pronghorn herds (antelope) as the females give birth, pulling the newborn(?) right from the mother. That's why the herds keep getting smaller.

Fish and game have told me there have been many cases of packs of coyotes doing the same to cattle.

They come right into the town and go to yards with fenced dogs. One will put on a lame act and get the dog half crazy and it goes over the fence after the coyote, who then runs like Hell. The dog gives chase and all of a sudden it's surrounded by a pack who drag it down for the kill.
They are very intelligent animals.

They used to hunt them every year by helicopter up here and pay bounties, but the tree huggers got that stopped, just like they got the trapping of the wretched things stopped by a ruse of calling leg traps cruel etc. and the law was passed not allowing leg traps. No alternative has been produced that's used here anyway. The coyote population continues to grow.

No urban legends here. I won't put it down if I don't know it to be true. Those things are a serious menace. :eek:
 
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The coyote population in North America continues to grow, continuously, year by year. They are very adaptable and intelligent creatures, and being opportunistic predators have become very dangerous to children, livestock and all domesticated pets. There have been many confirmed instances of dogs of all sizes, especially those chained out alone all night, being killed and eaten by packs of coyotes here in N. E. Ohio.

Coyotes, being very adaptable, have moved easily into suburban environments. They can live off of the existing populations of small game, as well as dogs and cats and even trash. They have even moved into urban environments, with a mating pair having been found in New York City back in the nineties. Amazing...
 

nifrand

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They love cats and puppies.Snacks.
Been around them all of my life.
Been hunting them for almost 40 years.Very intelligent.
Came upon a pack in Montana on a snow machine just above Yellowstone,suprised them out in the open.There were seven and they took off in seven different directions,away from me.Smart.
Randy
 
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