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Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
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21,652
So, what blade shape are you thinking on the paring knife? I like the standard, but I’ve gotta say I have a special place in my heart for a billhook one. It’s probably just nostalgia because my grandma use to have one. Good times and fond memories..
Either way, I’d be in for pairing knife and can’t wait to see what you come up with!
Edit: Guess I’ve been calling it by the wrong name lol. Its a peeling knife. Guess I’ll never know if I heard her wrong or just never questioned when she told me what something was. 😂
it'll be pretty standard wrt the edge profile. My general goal will be for a kind of a crossover knife- designed for typical paring knife applications AND for cutting the food you're about to put in your mouth

I left the chef with Edward over the weekend, and will be picking it up today. We have about 3 bushels worth of apples that'll need processed over the next week or so and I'll be glad to have it back for that

Ps. just picked up the knife, tried to pry more detailed feedback out of Edward but all he had to say was 'I wouldn't change a thing- it's just right for a general use chef knife'. He likes everything about the handle, other than it's not wood. Both he and Kelly mentioned how surprised they were with how grippy the Terotuf handle was even with fat, blood, water etc
 
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Joined
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it'll be pretty standard wrt the edge profile. My general goal will be for a kind of a crossover knife- designed for typical paring knife applications AND for cutting the food you're about to put in your mouth

I left the chef with Edward over the weekend, and will be picking it up today. We have about 3 bushels worth of apples that'll need processed over the next week or so and I'll be glad to have it back for that

Ps. just picked up the knife, tried to pry more detailed feedback out of Edward but all he had to say was 'I wouldn't change a thing- it's just right for a general use chef knife'. He likes everything about the handle, other than it's not wood. Both he and Kelly mentioned how surprised they were with how grippy the Terotuf handle was even with fat, blood, water etc
Sounds promising, is terofuff food safe?
 

Nathan the Machinist

KnifeMaker / Machinist / Evil Genius
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Feb 13, 2007
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11,440
Sounds promising, is terofuff food safe?

It's non-toxic, but it does not have any kind of formal food safe rating and could be a problem in a commercial kitchen. I would recommend G10 on a kitchen knife, although people have been using wood for thousands of years. I wouldn't put TT on a kitchen knife that I was going to sell because it is somewhat absorbent and I don't have confidence in it for that application, although I might use it on a knife for myself. It's light and grippy.
 

Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
21,652
I think a nice combination would be G10 liners with Richlite slabs. Richlite is actually foodsafe approved, comes in some very nice kitchen compatible colours- and is sustainably manufactured. Something that I care about.

Terotuf wouldn't be a spec I'd consider for commercial kitchen knives, but I don't know if I'll ever use anything else for my own personal kitchen knives- it's very stable and surprisingly grippy, even when finished to a semi polish. The reason I used it is because I have a few sheets and I could achieve the thickness I wanted combining it with the G10 liners.
 

Lorien

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
21,652
got a chance to scale and 'filet' (aka; pulverize) this poor white fish just now. I haven't filleted a fish in years and years, but I just got my fishing license and now that most of the around the house stuff is squared away for winter, my fingers are crossed for more practice on some local fishies. Obviously I will need to make myself a fillet knife.

nup9Ia8.jpg
 
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