Is H1 a good steel for an edc knife?

I don't think they get any harder from normal use and sharpening. Its a nice idea but I've never seen any evidence of it occurring. I just don't think running the edge across a piece of diamond or ceramic is creating enough molecular activity to change the hardness of the steel. I could be wrong. But I'm usually not. Hahaha. JK. :cool: :p
 
I don't think they get any harder from normal use and sharpening. Its a nice idea but I've never seen any evidence of it occurring. I just don't think running the edge across a piece of diamond or ceramic is creating enough molecular activity to change the hardness of the steel. I could be wrong. But I'm usually not. Hahaha. JK. :cool: :p

That's my experience as well, no noticeable improvement over the years.
 
I have a new Atlantic about to join the club. I also have a PE ark that I have to sharpen after every use. Use involves cutting bait sometimes so YMMV. My new mule will get that duty from now on and the ARK will be for cutting braid but I digress.
 
This is how H1 was explained to me.

H1 is not like normal steel that gets heat treated, there is actually no heat treatment involved. Instead the steel is compressed under tons of force and this Work Hardens the steel to a level suitable for a knife. So, if your knife is 3mm thick at the spine then it was 6mm thick before being Work Hardened. This compressing of the steel is what makes it harder but it's not an even hardness, the outer "layer" of the steel is the hardest point while the middle is the softest.

So, when grinding the blade with a serrated edge the edge is offset to one side of center putting the serrations into harder parts of the alloy. The plain edge being 50/50 ground puts the edge in the center of the steel which is the softest point of the alloy.
 
So if you sharpened the PE like an Emerson would that put the edge into the harder part of the metal?
 
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Sounds like it would benefit from a chisel grind if the above explaination is true
 
I love this knife, edge retention isn't super steels but it sharpens easily and the serrations help a working edge longer but quick touch ups on a strop with compound and the sharpmaker as others have mentioned will bring an edge right back (I would recommend picking up a tapered diamond rod or something like that also (I use a pocket field sharpener) because once every month or two you may want to individually sharpen each serration as the sharpmaker will file the points down), so for use as an edc steel I'd say yes if you don't mind minimal maintenance but if someone was going to be putting their knife to hard use daily considering the materials being cut might choose something else
 
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always with me!

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I cannot remember when this photo was taken, but my Salt 1 is going 10+ years now. Reground numerous times, has a zero edge on it, use it in the shop to cut silicone carbide sandpaper, trim branches, scrape gunk, you name it. You use steel, it dulls, you sharpen repeat. In my experience it has been good.

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It's liberating to be able to do anything and not worry about rust. H1 is great for serrated edges but I am looking forward to lc200n being available because I prefer plain edge for edc.
 
I sometimes sharpen mine at the garden using the bottom of ceramic flowerpots.
Works nice and quick

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This thread has inspired me to order a knife in H1. More than likely it will be one in plain edge since I enjoy sharpening my knives.
 
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