Looking for first Khukris

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Jul 3, 2009
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Hey guys, this is the first post i've made in this forum. I have been looking at khukris for a while now and am soon going to be getting one, however I don't know exactly what I should get. I want something that is battle ready (not that I am going to war, but who knows right) and something that can be used in the bush. This is not going to be a piece that will be placed on the wall to look at. Are the Himalayan import blades full tang? I am considering one of the Cold Steel products but am not sure as of yet. I need to know how tough the Himalayan imports are.
 
Welcome roughneckrob!

You have found the place with the best traditional nepalese khukuri to be had, you will find none tougher. H.I. makes their khukuri in both hidden tang and Chiruwa styles.(Here we call full tang Chiruwa to avoid confusion) If you see a khukuri with pins thru the handle it is the Chiruwa style. H.I. make it's hidden tangs extra stout and they are pinned at the buttcap. They are almost as strong as a chiruwa model.

In order to help get you the right khukuri, we will need to know how big a person you are, what size hands you have and what your intended usage is. Then we can start to narrow it down from there. Take some time to read all you can. Much info is posted in the Link Library at the top of the forum. There is even more in the Archives.

Feel free to ask any question and we will do our best to answer and steer you in the right direction.
 
Your in the right place!

First off ALL H.I. Kukri's are full tang construction in that the tang goes all the way through the handle. However some models are of hidden tang construction. Not to worry they are not weak rattail tangs they are incredibly strong. The kukri's which have what is commonly called a chiruwa handle construction have slab handles and are what many here in the west call full tang.

Most All of H.I.'s Kukri's are made tp be used. However there are some which are better suited to Hard Heavy use than others. i.e.

My Favorite is the M-43 model it is full tang and served me tremendously well during a several years long period of survival living.

The Chiruwa ang khola's are also well known as very tough hard use blades. They are generaly heavier than the M-43.

Then there are the WWII model, the BAS and several others including the new ASTK model. Plus the standard Ang Kholas.

So in order for us to be able to better help ya. What do you see yourself using it for most. How heavy are you willing to work with. About what is your stature it may have an influence on how long of a kukri you are comfortable with. For example my M-43 is 18" overall length, I stand 6'4".

Welcome
 
Welcome roughneckrob!

You have found the place with the best traditional nepalese khukuri to be had, you will find none tougher. H.I. makes their khukuri in both hidden tang and Chiruwa styles.(Here we call full tang Chiruwa to avoid confusion) If you see a khukuri with pins thru the handle it is the Chiruwa style. H.I. make it's hidden tangs extra stout and they are pinned at the buttcap. They are almost as strong as a chiruwa model.

In order to help get you the right khukuri, we will need to know how big a person you are, what size hands you have and what your intended usage is. Then we can start to narrow it down from there. Take some time to read all you can. Much info is posted in the Link Library at the top of the forum. There is even more in the Archives.

Feel free to ask any question and we will do our best to answer and steer you in the right direction.

Wow, that was the best welcome I have ever recived in any forum here. That alone just sold me on H.I. I am a fairly large man. 6'2" 195lbs with pretty large hands. I'll do more research before I decide, but if anyone can offer suggestions based off what I have so far to give me ahead start, please do and once again thank you.:thumbup::D
 
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I plan on using my Khukris for chopping in the Canadian wilderness mostly. As a survivalist it could very well be used for other things as well depending on whatever situation life may throw at me.
 
Here's my obligatory spine comparison of a Kabar kukri-machete and HI Vojpure... about ~17/32" on the Vojpure vs ~5/32" on the kabar (that's a bit over 4x as thick). Oh, and the Kabar kukri-machete is actually THICKER than the Cold Steel ones (which I believe are only ~1/8") :p

There's a lot of other differences between authentic kukris and modern interpretations, but speaking specifically about usage, I would say this is the primary one. An authentic kukri can do the tasks of a large knife as well as those of an ax whereas most modern day interpretations (or KLOs) perform the tasks of... well... a bent machete :eek:

P1020014.jpg
 
Oh! And by the way, I see you mentioned you're from Canada. I actually took the aforementioned kukri (an 18" Vojpure weighing about 2.4lbs) up with me to Canada during winter break. My father's side of the family lives in a small town about an hours drive from Kamloops, BC.

During a hike to find a Christmas tree, I used the Vojpure to hack down about three 6" thick, bug killed, still standing, frozen-solid pines just for funsies. It took me about 4-5 minutes a tree and I was quite worn out by the end - but if you've ever tried chopping frozen trees, you'll know how hard they can be so I was fairly impressed with the kukri (as well as myself). This was also in -15C below weather mind you (not factoring in windchill) and I'm a pretty small fellow at 5'3 and 110lbs...

Here's a shot of it - left most:
P1030317.jpg
 
Ok

Large guy with large hands. You would easily be able to make use of a bunch of models.

My M-43 has worked exceptionaly well while being lighter than the Ang Kholas. Works real well as a drawknife as well.

the 18" Chiruwa Ang Khola will also serve well it is heavier with a thicker edge. occasionaly you will find 20" CAK's but not as often

both the 18" and 20" Ang Khola's will work as well, though they have the through tang instead of the Chiruwa handle.

The newer Amar Singh Thapa Kukri is another heavy duty kuk that several folks have reported performing very well in outdoor applications.

Ther are also a few other kuk's that would serve well. The YCS being one.

Lot's of folks here also favor the bonecutters thoguh I haven't had the chance to use one of those yet.

The M-43 worked for me in the building of a couple trappers cabins and dozens upon dozens of shorter term survival shelters, the building of camp items, traps, cutting firewood and much more.
 
Well.... Wildmike pretty much covered it and actually gave recommendations of something other than an M-43 this time! :p :eek: :thumbup: :D
My advice, and others will tell you also....watch the DOTD sales that get posted about 2:30EST most every day, depending on available stock. Sizes are Over all length, weight is usually posted. All you need do is find the style you like and pick the one that calls to you saying "buy me and i will serve you well"..... Here we believe these fine handmade blades have a Soul that only love and fine craftsmanship can instill. They really do call to you.
 
wildmike said:
So in order for us to be able to better help ya. What do you see yourself using it for most. How heavy are you willing to work with. About what is your stature it may have an influence on how long of a kukri you are comfortable with. For example my M-43 is 18" overall length, I stand 6'4".

Sounds about right. I'm 6'5" and I like my khukris about 20" long.
 
If you wanna carry it on your belt, there's a lot to be said for the 16" CAK. Its such a tank there's no way to describe it, but you'll feel what I mean as soon as you handle one. Its kinda like a pry bar with a sharp edge. Its a great compromise between power-chopping & ease of carry, a hatchet & a knife.

CIMG0129.jpg
 
I originaly chose the M-43 due to reading a FAQ on the H.I. site. It compare the blade drop of all the then current models. I factored in the additional drop of the M-43 handle. Which puts the point in natural alignment for a thrust and increases tip speed in use. That and a thinner edge w/ lighter weight. promised a blade wich would have enhanced shearing/cutting power. I wasn't disapointed in the least.

However the dropped handle design does not lend itself as well to using the spine of the kukri in a reverse manner.

The Chiruwa Ang Kholas have a great reputation as hard workers as do the standard Ang Kholas.

If you wanted a smaller blade then the 15" BAS, and 16" WWII are both fine blades.

As are the 15" Ang Khola and 16" Chiruwa Ang Khola.
 
At 6'5", IMO, anything under 20" (they are measured by OAL, so that translates to 15" or so of blade) will probably feel a bit small, and even at considerably under 6'5", I find anything under 18" OAL, to be unimpressive for heavy work.

I'd probably reverse the order of the top two given my Wildmike, and recommend the Chiruwa Ang Khola as my top pick. Here's my 20" CAK (The knife is an HI R-10):
100_0187.jpg


Second choice would most definitely be an M43:
100_0123.jpg
 
@ roughneckrob

Welcome:D to the Himalayan Imports Khukuri Virus (HIKV)

Things to consider while browsing the models:

Handle: Shape, Size, Material
Shape - some are curved others not so much.
Size - most (with some exclusions) are made to fit large western hands
Material - some folks find the wooden ones have more grip

Blade: Shape, Size, Weight (not discussing the strength or quality, those come standard)
Shape - nice curved belly for chopping, "straighter" blades for self defense etc.etc.
Size - 18" up (for your size)
Weight - you will probably not want to carry it on your belt when trekking (size dependable...) 25 to 35oz

You will probably want to have 2 different models (or more when the HIKV hits you:D) as to cover all possible wilderness applications.
One for chopping and heavy camp duty and one to carry on your belt for all else.
 
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HI makes many very good and useful models. Everybody has their favorites, for various reasons. I use my khuks often here on our property where the bulk of the chopping duties are performed using khuks in the 15"-18" range, chopping mostly oak but sometimes other woods such as hackberry, elm and pecan.

I normally use a Ganga Ram or a Pen Knife. I often have to cut branches one handed which are over my head, so a very heavy khuk is not optimal for me.

If you are interested in a general duty khuk, personally, I would stay away from the smaller or larger khuks and look for a size which can be packed or carried easily yet is heavy enough to chop branches and trees up to 4" or so without undue strain. IMO that means a khuk which is in the 16-18" range (OAL).

I personally prefer through tang or hidden tang khuks, as they are lighter and more blade-heavy, and because I feel they transfer less shock to the hands while chopping.

Andy
 
By the Power of Ayo Gorkhali,

CopyofIMG_4649-1.jpg


I summon General Amar Thapa Singh to unleash its wrath

CopyofIMG_4647.jpg


Destroy anything on the way!

IMG_4829.jpg
 
The Cold steel kukri machetes (<20$) are 1/8 inch thick, but the gurkha kukri is 8mm thick. Very stout and great value on the sk5 version.

I say if its for collection then get a HI but if your planning on putting hard use (not to say that HI kuks cant take hard use:)) on it then get a cold steel gurkha kukri.
 
By the Power of Ayo Gorkhali,

CopyofIMG_4649-1.jpg


I summon General Amar Thapa Singh to unleash its wrath

CopyofIMG_4647.jpg


Destroy anything on the way!

IMG_4829.jpg

My god, thats it. Thats the one right there. Amazing, this is exactly what I had in mind when I think about a khukris. What is the name of this model and how do I go about getting one.:D
 
jackdaripper,
Having used a KLO (Khukuri Like Object) in thin stainless for many years and then using the REAL thing. There is no comparison! The Cold Steel is going to handle like a heavy(for a machete) weight forward machete. A real Khukuri (HI or otherwise) at 3 times the thickness and weight really doesn't handle like anything else but a Khukuri. IMHO if you are going to get a cheaper Cold Steel Khukuri you might as well just get a good quality machete.
I've broken the tips on Khukuri like objects made from stainless (The cheaper Cold Steel might be 1095 carbon steel), the 5160 carbon steel the HI's are made of will bend a little if they have any deformation at all.
 
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