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Michigan Vs. Jersey Pattern

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by KiwiBloke, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    I was just reading through some old threads from 2014 about phantom bevels and was admiring this photo posted by double ott of his Kelly Perfect axes.. In looking at the Jersey pattern shape vs. the Michigan pattern it got me thinking what is the major difference in the results the heads produce? I understand the Jersey has those lugs which hold the head onto the haft more securely and a longer bit so what tasks can this head preform better at than the Michigan? And vise versa there must be a job it is less suited for than the Michigan is?

    Just some things I am thinking about as I have never seen/used both side by side.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  2. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    I am wondering if I am getting confused here are the 2 single bits facing the left hand side Dayton's and the one single bit looking right is a Michigan? I only say that because their 2 poles look well squared off compared to the other one?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  3. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    Also the rounded pole over the squared off pole? Is this purely stylistic or serves to support its overall intended purpose of use?
     
  4. binoclard

    binoclard

    16
    Nov 2, 2018
    @Square_peg replied that in my thread, about the same subject:

     
  5. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    Ah Yes! Thanks binoclard I literally wrote this thread and then read that afterwards.

    Still interested in knowing why people who have both choose one over the other for certain tasks.. ?
     
  6. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    I can tell you right now that most michigans I see are fairly heavy with very round cheeks so they'd be pretty good with splitting, other than that idk, never swung an old Michigan. I do have one I need to get to
     
    Brian Rust and KiwiBloke like this.
  7. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Pound for pound a Michigan will be a little better splitter. But watch out for the newer ones with flat cheeks. While Mann owned Collins they made a ton of these and most American made Collins you find these days fall into this group - those Collins Homesteads with the blue sticker with the big 'C'.

    The Jersey will generally be a better bucker, wider, thinner but still convex enough to pop the chip.

    And these are all subtle differences. It's really more about what pleases your eye.
     
  8. Old Axeman

    Old Axeman

    502
    Jan 10, 2015
    When you get down to the subtle differences, yes, what pleases your eye. But also, what feels right in your hands. Two axes side by side, one feels right to you, the other feels right to the guy standing next to you.
     
  9. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    When doing any job with sufficient frequency, intensity, or duration, small differences add up to make big differences. You won't find much difference between the two in most cases if doing a single small job, but if using it often, intensely, or for extended periods of continuous work you'll find you prefer one preferable to the other.
     
  10. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    Thank you phantomknives, Square_peg, Axeman, FortyTwoBlades! Appreciate the input. Cleared a lot up for me and it makes sense.

    Jersey pattern axes are rarely on the market in NZ (if I had some nice ones I wouldn't be letting them go either) so haven't had the opportunity to get one other than importing which I may end up doing some day.

    I am eye up this Michigan True Temper Kelly Perfect however.. I have a TT Flint Edge but it is a hatchet so this would be my first proper vintage American axe (I currently have several euros but am taking my time now and spending my money more wisely to even up the American/Canada - Europe playing field). From what Iv'e seen NZ has a lot of Euro heads, heaps of vintage English Brades and Hytest's as well as Canadian Kelly's mostly being Dandenongs, so would love to acquire a nice vintage American axe now. Other than a new, perhaps longer, handle from my eye it looks mostly in good nick.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018 at 1:27 AM
  11. FLINT77

    FLINT77

    94
    Apr 8, 2013
    Very nice. I like it. That handle is a big bonus in my opinion. Do you know the weight of the head? Most Michigan's seem to be 3.5-4lbs.
     
  12. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    Oh right, apparently the handle is sound with no wiggle but it didn't look like a great hang to me with the gaps as the bottom of the eye. Also the top of the eye is looking a bit weathered. I was thinking a new handle well hung would really make this girl shine. Doesn't have to happen immediately of course but did plan on putting it on the to do list. I am however a novice so perhaps the 'use it until it breaks. replace it.' mindset is most appropriate here.
     
  13. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    I do not know unfortunately. It looks sizable but hard to tell with the handle length can make perspective a bit out of wack. I am hoping it is 3.5 - 4.. I really do need something with a bit if heft in it to do splitting work!
     
  14. Jasper33

    Jasper33

    107
    Jan 18, 2015
    I may be wrong, but I thought the Michigan pattern was made for cutting frozen hardwoods. The rounded corners of the toe and heel are much stronger than pointed ones and less likely to snap off.
     
    Square_peg and garry3 like this.
  15. Jasper33

    Jasper33

    107
    Jan 18, 2015
    The hang could be better, but I think that’s a nice looking axe in great shape overall!
     
    KiwiBloke likes this.
  16. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    Thanks Jasper appreciate your input. Not much frozen wood around here but definitely some insanely hard wood. Heaps of eucalyptus..hard as steel!
     
  17. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    114
    Oct 2, 2018
    The Pole. Was wondering if that part that is a bit deformed was smashed across a wedge? Would you take a file to that and tidy it up or not worth it? How about those couple of minute hairline cracks anything to keep an eye on?


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018 at 1:30 AM
  18. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Console yourself with a Hytest Forester or Craftsman which are a match for the best American choppers. Very similar to our Connecticut pattern.
     
    Trailsawyer likes this.
  19. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Either way. It's got a pretty clean poll. I'd probably leave it alone.
     
    garry3 likes this.
  20. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    Having damaged a few axes in hardwoods I would think a frozen sugar maple would be a heck of a challenge. I have looked for historic footage of them being axe felled but have not found one yet. The amount of salvaged maple logs being pulled up from the great lakes says they harvested plenty of them though.
     

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