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NEW Work Hawk - 52100 Practical Tomahawk

Discussion in 'For Sale: Fixed Blades' started by Park Swan, Jun 9, 2016.

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  1. Park Swan

    Park Swan

    683
    Mar 15, 2016
    Hi Guys,
    I've got another Work Hawk ready to go. The original idea for this hawk started a few years ago when I began investigating the concept of a single tool for backpacking and bushcraft. There are quite a few "tactical" tomahawks around, but I was always shocked to see that they were so heavy, not usually ground for chopping wood so much as people/tanks/helicopters, and generally unwieldy for normal outdoor use. I wanted to get as much chopping power into a 1lb tool as possible without sacrificing the ability to do all of the basic camp chores and more or muddying the design into a gimmicky survival tool. Eventually, the Work Hawk was born.

    The tomahawk for sale today has a "natural" canvas micarta handle which brings the weight up to 22.5oz. This is the first Work Hawk with the handle scales only bolted on. If you're really worried about weight, you can remove the scales and do a paracord wrap, which pits the weight right around 17oz. The 52100 easily takes a hair popping edge. I stole the octagonalized handle from working axes used through the 19th and early 20th centuries. The handle is gently curved for an ideal position for powerful chopping. The slight beard and hole in the head allow you to choke up and cut with finesse. If you've never carved wood with a small, sharp axe, you're missing out! I'm thinking of putting a video together to showcase the Work Hawk and do some different cutting tasks. If that's something you'd be interested in seeing, let me know!

    The Work Hawk is a blast to use for it's intended purposes, which means processing wood (even game) in a number of ways. It is not intended for concrete chopping, safe-breaching, etc.


    -Aldo's 52100, .25"
    -Sandblasted finish
    -57-58RC bit and poll, spring tempered (47RC) tang
    -Peter's Heat Treat
    -Structurally skeletonized tang (see CAD file picture)
    -Natural Canvas Micarta sanded @ 120 grit and waxed.
    -Sharp!
    -Chainring bolts
    12.75" length, 3.9" bit to poll, 3.75" cutting edge
    1" wide handle, .75" thick
    This Work Hawk comes with the pictured kydex sheath.

    Introductory price of $SPF via Paypal includes USPS Priority Mail to the CONUS. First "I'll take it" gets it.
    You must be 18+ to purchase. You are responsible for compliance with your local laws.

    Here is an image of the final CAD file for this design.
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    I just realized there are still pencil marks on the sheath in this shot. They're gone now; they erase right off.
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    Thanks for looking! All feedback is welcome and appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  2. rodriguez7

    rodriguez7 Gila wilderness knife works

    Feb 1, 2009
    I would love to see a video of this axe, and what it can do. I like the design, and concept.
     
  3. Ritt

    Ritt

    May 17, 2004
    I'll take it, PM inbound.
     
  4. Park Swan

    Park Swan

    683
    Mar 15, 2016
    Thanks, I'll try to make it happen soon :thumbup:

    It's yours! PM replied.
     
  5. Spey

    Spey

    724
    Apr 15, 2012
    Could you describe the grind bevels (primary & secondary degrees including TBE of what appears to be a secondary bevel?). Also, it appears you have two differing handle cut-outs designs (could you describe your reasoning between these two?). What's the design usage of the grooves in the pole? I would 2nd a vote to see an in-use video.

    Regards,
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  6. rodriguez7

    rodriguez7 Gila wilderness knife works

    Feb 1, 2009
    At 17 ounces, this may be a tool I would definitely be interested in for the back country.
     
  7. Park Swan

    Park Swan

    683
    Mar 15, 2016
    TBE? I've been playing with slightly different grinds on these first models. This particular hawk is the most acute, at ~18 degrees inclusive for the main bevels. There is a super small convex transition into the microbevel.

    The "jimping" on the poll is intended to register with the surface being struck (or being used to strike). It grabs the wood a bit more than my prototype with a smooth poll. It also provides a secure grip for the non-dominant hand when using the hawk as a plane or drawknife. Thanks for the feedback!

    Thanks, if you have any ideas about how to go about making the paracord wrap comfortable without adding much padding/weight underneath, I'm open to suggestions. Of course, I could just offer the finished metal hawk with no handle for users to make their own or try their own paracord preferences. I may do that once my website is up. Thanks.
     
  8. Spey

    Spey

    724
    Apr 15, 2012
    TBE = Thickness Behind Edge

    That "jumping" on the pole looks like it would tear up small wooden stake heads (field made tent & tarp pegs, etc. and also the users palm under working pressure during use working wood). Just a couple first hand thoughts/observations.

    A number of interesting elements I see otherwise. Would be interesting to test this design. Please let me know if you choose to do a pass-around test for R.D. purposes. Would be interesting to compare to other Hawks I typically carry.

    Regards,
     
  9. dogrunner

    dogrunner

    Dec 26, 2003
    If you offered one with no scales, I'd buy it and take a shot at a DIY wrap of some sort. I'm also looking to hit sub-20 oz in an effective pack tool and I really like the design of yours.
     
  10. Park Swan

    Park Swan

    683
    Mar 15, 2016
    Ah, the edge was between and 15 and 20 thousandths on this hawk before adding the secondary bevel.

    I could see how jimping might be aggressive for some. I am considering the possibility of some kind of checkering effect on the poll as a middle ground, similar to a knurled texture. I'll keep you in mind for a pass around. I think it's a good idea once there is enough interest.

    Thanks fo the feedback!
     
  11. Spey

    Spey

    724
    Apr 15, 2012
    NO, that is not how/where TBE is measured.

    TBE is a static measurement after the grinds have been completed. Effectively the overall width measurement taken from where the Primary meets the secondary (sometimes called the shoulder(s). Effectively, the sectional dimension at the second transition point of the bevels (the first being the apex).

    So, back to what I was asking related to this tool ..., very standard measurements related to potential performance ...
    1) Primary bevel angle ?
    2) Secondary bevel angle ?
    3) Any additional bevels (like a micro, etc.) ?
    3) TBE ?

    If edge thickness was 15-20 thou before adding the secondary, then the TBE is going to be greater than those dimensions..., because grinding the secondary, it will have climbed further up the primary bevel progressively increasing the TBE (same as happens each time a secondary is reground, resharpened or touched up).

    TBE can, and many times does, vary along an edge. How and where it varies based on intended usage and desired performance.

    Regards,
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2016
  12. Park Swan

    Park Swan

    683
    Mar 15, 2016
    I know what thickness behind the edge is, and I understand why it isn't the same as edge thickness before sharpening.

    As previously stated:
    The TBE on this hawk is consistent along the edge. I did not measure the TBE before sending it to its new home, however it could calculated relatively accurately given the other details of the edge. The small secondary bevel is ~20 DPS. I neglected to provide you with a specific number because the secondary bevel has a small convex transition into the main bevel which can't be seen in these photos. There isn't a specific shoulder to measure TBE, you'd have to specify a distance back from the edge.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2016
  13. Park Swan

    Park Swan

    683
    Mar 15, 2016
    Thanks, that's going to be an option when the next batch of these is due. Shoot me an email if you want to receive updates.
     
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