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Premier quality Goldenberg tool identification

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Mar 23, 2020
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Inherited this from father-in-laws shop. I don’t know what it’s purpose is and would appreciate any help that I can
 
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Mar 23, 2020
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Yankee Josh. Thank you for your input. I’ll try to figure it out. I’m so clueless on this type of forum that I accidentally deleted your reply!
It originally had good edges to it. I just took a bastard file and 3 different grits of diamond stone to the tool. By its shape I believe that it may be for cleaving off pieces of kindling from seasoned firewood. I tried it out on a piece of old 4x4 and it works like a dream. If I can figure out photo posting , I’ll include a video.
 
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17226q

Great link!! I believe that I have deduced it's use. For lack of a better name, I’m calling it a “kindling hatchet”. After using a bastard file and 3 different grits of diamond stone, it works like a dream. I have posted pics and a video.(the pic w the house is a video of it in use)
 
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Arathol

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Jan 1, 2003
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Appears to be a woodworking tool, maybe a paring chisel of some sort. Its supposed to have a flat back with a single ground edge, so if it has a grind on both sides its not longer useful in its original purpose.
 

Square_peg

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The flat side is designed to be pressed against something. It's not designed to swing.
 
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Mar 23, 2020
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Appears to be a woodworking tool, maybe a paring chisel of some sort. Its supposed to have a flat back with a single ground edge, so if it has a grind on both sides its not longer useful in its original purpose.
The tool had no file or grinding marks on it before I touched up (and I do mean touched up) the edges. It had not been retouched since it was made. The chisel edge sharpness was dulled over 16 years of being in a bucket of other tools. It was beveled exactly as shown in the pics. It would not have ever been completely flat on the back side. The bevels meet at the center of the thickness.
 
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Dec 20, 2015
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I,too,doubt that it was meant to be held by hand...Chisel-grind would also be an odd choice for hand-held splitting,and balance would be all funky...

It looks like it was meant to be chucked into some mechanical device...Maybe a lathe,or an early mill of some kind?With a bolt or a pin through that hole,for some outboard action?

Good puzzler!:)
 
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Mar 23, 2020
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That handle isn't right for a tool to be used as a kindling hatchet. It's something else.
I can’t for the life of me come up with a better explanation. The wedging of the edge, the very slight bow to the “flat” side plus the angle on the front all add up to grease wood splitting. The handle is definitely unorthodox, but not awkward.
 

Arathol

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If its a chisel or other woodworking tool of some sort there would not be any marks. A good woodworking tool is kept sharp by polishing it on a fine stone to a mirror finish.
 

Arathol

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Jan 1, 2003
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Just out of curiosity, what sort of tools was it found with? Some context might help to discover what it was used for...
 
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