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Premier quality Goldenberg tool identification

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by HyperHarold, Mar 23, 2020.

  1. HyperHarold

    HyperHarold

    14
    Mar 23, 2020
    That is a definite possibility.
     
  2. HyperHarold

    HyperHarold

    14
    Mar 23, 2020
    This most likely came to the US from Germany by way of my wife’s great grandfather Rupert. It was hung on a pegboard with a plethora of common modern hand tools. No additional context.
     
  3. HyperHarold

    HyperHarold

    14
    Mar 23, 2020
    I had noticed the similarity to a modern double bladed cleaver. However I was convinced that it was a wood working tool due to the company’s connection to axes. your comment has me thinking that this is the most likely explanation.
     
    jake pogg likes this.
  4. HyperHarold

    HyperHarold

    14
    Mar 23, 2020
    This also explains why the handle resembles a cast iron frying pan handle.
     
    Square_peg, jake pogg and garry3 like this.
  5. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    It reminds me of a batte de vannier handle. Probably the material is softer than what's needed to maintain a keen edge. S'why it sharpened up with so little effort. In fact the long edged sides are not for cutting but giving pointed blows and ought to be rounded, the flat back-side used to break up the cells of the meat so it doesn't shrivel in the frying pan.
     
  6. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    [​IMG]


    Bob
     
  7. HyperHarold

    HyperHarold

    14
    Mar 23, 2020
    I exaggerated when I said 10 minutes. It took about 150 strokes w steady pressure along the length of each surface w a good bastard file followed up w about 10-15 minutes of honing through 3 grits of diamond stone. I left in some nicks that would have taken appreciatively longer to remove. The time and effort expended were in keeping w the time required in maintaining the edges on my planes and chisels. It is good quality steel.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020 at 2:16 PM
  8. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Winner!
     
    HyperHarold likes this.
  9. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Made for flattening chops to a uniform thickness so they will cook the same.
     
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  10. jake pogg

    jake pogg Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 20, 2015
    You guys solved the mystery!

    What a cool implement!:)...i now feel like a savage,using the edge of a plate all these years....
     
  11. HyperHarold

    HyperHarold

    14
    Mar 23, 2020
    Ernest, you may have the answer. I looked up “vannier “ and found that it meant “basket weaver”. It didn’t make sense to me but I reached out to my father-in-law’s sister and it turns out that her grandfather was a wire weaver! I think that the tool was not meant to be sharp edged but rather used to tighten the weave in cable making!
     
    Square_peg likes this.
  12. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    Hey man I'm glad you got your answers! You didn't delete my comment. Haha:). I did. I no sooner posted it and you reposted with a great description. :thumbsup:. Glad you got it all figured out. :D:D
     
    HyperHarold likes this.
  13. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    I once made such a battering implement for preparing dried hams with the same intention in mind which I call "batte de jambone" or "ham slapper".:)
     
    HyperHarold likes this.
  14. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    You can see the similarities.[​IMG]
     
    garry3 and HyperHarold like this.
  15. Square_peg

    Square_peg Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    I ain't touching that. :eek:
     
    HyperHarold likes this.

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