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Removing a glued wedge

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Maine20, Mar 15, 2019 at 6:19 AM.

  1. Maine20

    Maine20

    238
    Aug 8, 2017
    Anyone ever removed a glued wedge? How did it go?
     
  2. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    682
    Mar 31, 2018
    Only removed an epoxied one and it wasn't fun. Did you glue it or someone else?
     
  3. junkenstien

    junkenstien

    628
    Feb 15, 2017
    Did on a couple swiss surplus axes.Drill and a little chisel it wasnt that bad.
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  4. Maine20

    Maine20

    238
    Aug 8, 2017
    I have never glued one but have been thinking about starting to. I will say that I Haven’t had any unglued wedges budge, so I am not sure if it’s worth the extra effort to remove if a rehang is needed.
     
    ithinkverydeeply and Yankee Josh like this.
  5. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I just use a drill w/ a 1/4" bit and a chisel. They come right out. DM
     
    ithinkverydeeply and Yankee Josh like this.
  6. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    682
    Mar 31, 2018
    I shy away from glue or swell lock for the same reason you mentioned. I don't have an issue with heads coming loose or wedges coming out. It happened to me a couple times but it was my choice of material that caused it. I've been using white birch for wedges and i think I'm going to permanently switch. I'm having really good luck with them. It has all the properties of popular but is a tad harder. I know it isn't very rot resistant but kept free from water and well oiled i think they'll hold up fine.
     
    Fmont likes this.
  7. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Just to let people know, Swell Lock has no adhesive properties.
     
  8. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    329
    Oct 2, 2018
    Where does White Birch sit on the Janka scale? I couldn't find white birch on the database. Does it have another name?
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  9. deepobs

    deepobs

    1
    Feb 7, 2019
    I have routed out enough to get the head off and rehang, I used a dremel with a small round bit, it wasn't pretty, but it worked
     
    Square_peg, A17 and Yankee Josh like this.
  10. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    682
    Mar 31, 2018
    Screenshot_20190316-204856_Chrome.jpg I was saying it was harder just from feel and not from a scientific standpoint. It certainly feels harder than poplar. I've been using it exclusively now for awhile and I'm loving it.
    Screenshot_20190316-205707_Chrome.jpg
    I wasn't aware of how hard white(paper) birch actually is! I've found it's still soft enough to conform to the small irregularities in the eye. Good stuff.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019 at 9:07 PM
  11. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    951
    Mar 2, 2013
    This "poplar" or Tulip poplar or Southern yellow poplar, it's no poplar.
     
    Yankee Josh likes this.
  12. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    286
    Apr 20, 2017
    "Common names" are an exacerbated problem in the USA, as the country is so large. Tulip poplar isn't poplar but it's the most common "poplar" wood many people in the USA run into. Our "cedars" aren't cedars, etc. It can be confusing, and that's just commercial timber. It's a problem across the board.

    When you start to talk to people in different parts of the country about the same organism and they call it different things, the same common names but refer to different organisms in different areas, etc. I can tell you as a biologist I figure out what they are talking about specifically in the most literal sense. Because if you don't you're getting nowhere fast.

    Common names aren't reliable without context. It's simpler and more quickly accurate to know the organism by the binomial name and then figure out what people are talking about.
     
    jake pogg and Yankee Josh like this.
  13. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    682
    Mar 31, 2018
    It's the only kind of poplar we have in Maine. It's all junk. So that's why I call it poplar. But what do you guys mean? It isn't poplar? Everyone I know knows what poplar is. Except my uncle and everyone else pronounces it(Regional diction) popple.
    And our eastern white cedar sure seems like cedar to me! What do you mean there?
     
  14. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    682
    Mar 31, 2018
    Oh i see. Cottonwood. Among other things. Wow there really is truth to the statement "the smarter you get the dumber you are". My whole life I thought, because folks here in Maine don't enunciate very well, that when they said popple they meant poplar. WRONG. Screenshot_20190317-093618_Chrome.jpg Screenshot_20190317-093631_Chrome.jpg
    I've always loathed poplar. Or popple I guess. They have a yellow fungus all over the trunk and they're just scraggly and ugly. The wood sucks and they don't live all that long.
    Our eastern white cedar though I do believe is a very good representation of cedar.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019 at 9:45 AM
    A17 and ithinkverydeeply like this.
  15. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    951
    Mar 2, 2013
    For just as long as you're talking with people in your own region then there is no confusion.
     
    Fmont, A17 and Yankee Josh like this.
  16. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    286
    Apr 20, 2017
    Our "cedars" are in the family cupressaceae, which is cyprus. Cedrus spp. are the "true cedars," none of them naturally occurring in the USA.

    Poplar is anything in the genus Populus, but "Tulip Poplar" isn't in the genus. We're victim to a lot of this type of stuff.
     

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