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Off Topic Rusting a cheap harbor freight hatchet to age it ( update )

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Hickory n steel, Aug 22, 2017.

  1. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    I just finished reshaping my harbor freight hatchet head into a Hudson bay ( probably weighs about a pound now ) and now it's time to make it look old, because that's the best look.

    Edit

    I've settled on leaving it on the wet ground occasionally flipping it as well as misting it with water.

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    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  2. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    Oh, at the nice old heads I've came across here in KY that were pitted to hell because of the ammonium nitrate used to grow Burley'Baccer. Don't take long either.
     
    BG_Farmer likes this.
  3. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
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  4. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    A little rock salt, or fertilizer would really speed the process along.
     
  5. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
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  6. quinton

    quinton

    Nov 4, 2006
    Rub some salt on it, and it will form rust overnight.
     
  7. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
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    Agent_H likes this.
  8. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
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    Miller '72 likes this.
  9. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    But salted water is known to the State of California to cause cancer!! :p

    (Sorry, couldn't help myself :|...)
     
  10. Moonw

    Moonw

    Nov 19, 2014
    What if I told you that forcing the distressed look on your tools is a hipster thing to do :p?

    I should've seen this coming...that thread yesterday about old handles was a trap...:)

    (Still couldn't help myself...;) )
     
  11. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Harbor freight tools don't count.
     
    Moonw and FortyTwoBlades like this.
  12. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    I used to rust new traps by first boiling them and then leaving them out side in a wet burlap sack. Three or four days would usually do it.
     
  13. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
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  14. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    I can only share what I've tried, new steel and old steel react differently as well as from head to head and even given the texture of the surface.

    But here are a couple of more low tech approaches/tips you could try:
    First:
    1. mix up a cap of white vinegar with dijon mustard - it's what I had but there are seeds that stick so maybe something like French's. Mix it to not quite a "paste"
    2. cut up some dabbing sized sponges. (you won't want to save these after a couple of runs)
    3. apply with dabs evenly and very thinly across the metal
    4. Let that side dry completely
    5. repeat other side or poll or whatever
    6. wipe it clean and repeat

    Second:
    1. run a looped wire through the eye so you can hang it bit down.
    2. coat the edge with a couple of coats of nail polish
    3. put white vinegar in a spray bottle
    4. mist each side evenly
    5. hang outside

    I think after the vinegar dries it kind of halts the darker look so you can reapply and let it dry as much as you want. Some of it will wipe off but that is when you go at it again. You can also conservatively combine all of the other ideas too.

    Why not have some fun? And besides, if you don't? you are going to wonder what happens if you did, right? Hickorynsteel - you're not a hipster.

    Yuck, I can taste it now lol. :thumbsup:
     
  15. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
    Btw mustard and vinegar are a no go because my nose is allergic to them, I'm not joking they both make me vomit nine times out of ten with only a couple of whiffs.

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  16. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    I hear you there. I actually taste "tin foil" right now thinking about it when it should be Hefeweizen lol.

    Oh, the sacrifices we make for science...
     
  17. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel

    Feb 11, 2016
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  18. Bimjo

    Bimjo

    101
    Oct 3, 2001
    Hahaha! Well played!
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  19. Zombie411

    Zombie411

    630
    Aug 5, 2017
    The hydrogen peroxide IS an oxidizer so whatever process you choose it (peroxide) will hasten the process.
    You can also buy it in gallons at higher than average (pharmacy/dollar store) concentrations.
     
  20. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    543
    Jun 25, 2017
    Quickest way is using electrolysis, but the results are unpredictable. Most forms of pitting on axes come from the steel itself. Most modern axes won't pit that much, since its mainly homogenous steel. The older axes usually aren't that homogenous so work better with it.
     
    Lapedog likes this.

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