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seal workout?

Joined
Nov 20, 2001
Messages
2,600
2 quick ones--Where can I find a good basic training outline, and a seal workout, and, how do you , Chris feel about weightlifting vs. pushups, etc for overall conditioning- I know the SEALs lift crazy weights, but does that kill muscular endurance? Thanks
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2001
Messages
189
Here, I threw this onto a tripod storage account for you.

US Navy SEAL Physical Fitness Guide
http://members.tripod.com/sick_-_city/US_Navy_SEAL_Physical_Fitness_Guide.pdf

It's a 15.8 MB PDF, so save it to disk instead of just opening it. You'll need Adobe Acrobat Reader (free) to open it. If you don't have it, you may find it here:
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep.html


UPDATE: It seems tripod didn't like actually having a file in that account, so they've banged me out of it. If someone has a server who's willing to mirror that file for awhile, let us know and I'll send it to you.
 
Joined
May 12, 2001
Messages
11,707
imho ya outta try push-ups AND weightlifting, i always lift chest 2X a wk, and pushups virtually everyday, along w/situps......

also pushups are an excellent way to warm up for chest days .....

just my .01 worth

sifu
 
Joined
May 31, 1999
Messages
643
I can't get that link for the fitness specs to work. Tried copy and paste. It says it can't find the page or something like that.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2001
Messages
189
I can't get that link for the fitness specs to work. Tried copy and paste. It says it can't find the page or something like that.

Yes, I mentioned that tripod had cancelled my account because that file was too big.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2000
Messages
194
There are several books available at Barnes+Noble written by former SEAL's that outline some workouts. There are also video tapes including some by the same guy this forum is named for. These might answer all of your questions.
 

edmoses

Usual Suspect
Joined
Apr 28, 2000
Messages
1,095
Bodyhammer,

If you send the file to my email, I will post a link in the morning.

Regards,

Ed
 
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
Messages
82
Aren't the exercises recommended for the SEALS just endurance purposes? Will these exercises benefit me in self defense? Isn't there a tradeoff between having large muscle and speed?
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2000
Messages
194
If you are training for selfdefence ie. boxing, martial arts, then weight training/cal/running/swimming will only help you. Endurance is a great asset to possess in many regards, don't over look it. I would not worry about getting too big. Stay away from illegal drugs, and workout as much as you like, its unlikely you will be too big or become slow.---Kevin
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
296
I remember watching one of those Discovery channel segments on the SEALS; the guy who was talking about training said that each class they started would have a few lads who were "pumped", so to speak, but that none of them ever made it through the primarily-endurance-related training.
It's possible to have good muscle mass, speed, and endurance, but it requires a lot of specialized training. The more muscle, the more oxygenation required. There comes a point at which you just can't keep oxygenating all that tissue.
Endurance athletes, such as pro bicycle road racers and long distance runners, tend to be rather slender, with a preponderance of slow-twitch muscle fiber. Genetics plays more than a small part in all this; your lung capacity cannot be increased to any great degree, for instance.
Olympic wrestlers are a good example of speed, power, and endurance, and they go through ungodly training to maintain it.
 

Ken Cox

Moderator
Joined
Dec 11, 1998
Messages
15,923
Most people don't realize the enormous amounts of energy required by SEAL and Force Recon types of operations.
Strength counts almost for nothing.
The ability to put in long hours of activity, cover great distances and function around and in cold water matter most.
For those with SEAL aspirations, a half hour of stretching, pull-ups, push-ups, followed by a daily three-mile run and a two-mile open-water swim will do.

However, most people don't have SEAL aspirations; rather they want to wear their body like a costume, for the same reason we choose a car to drive.
Cars ought to provide nothing more than transportation.
Nonetheless, we lust after cars that will go 180 miles per hour and SUV's that have the appearance of ability to go off road, accross the great deserts, through the jungles and over the mountains.
We do this to impress other people, convince ourselves of our own personal worth, and to maintain our illusions of power, safety and control.
If a person wants to wear a wrestler's body as a costume, he can put in three or four hours a day, six days a week, and possibly sustain this for six years before injuries make it imossible to continue.

In the real world, cardio-vascular fitness and healthy movement mean everything.
Run at a comfortable pace 20 minutes a day, three days a week.
Swim laps for 20 minutes twice a week.
Learn to play handball (not raquetball) and play twice a week (hard to find players anymore, start a club).
Study Tai Chi or purchase some Feldenkrais tapes and use them.
Study judo and Brazilian JuJitsu twice a week.
Hang a speed bag and a heavy bag in the garage (for those who have no garage, I have a method for hanging a heavy bag in the house that will not transmit sound to the rest of the building - contact me).
Learn to skip rope.
Buy a door frame pull-up bar from a wrestler's supply house and do pull-ups three days a week.
Use the floor for push-ups and sit-ups three days a week.
Learn to walk on the hands until one can walk around for a few minutes upside-down, and then do it regularly (Archie Moore, the greatest fighter in history, trained by walking on his hands).

Treat the body with respect, as one would a friend, and do not cause it injury.
The body desires and appreciates wholesome exercise; it loathes pain and punishment.
If we push our body too hard, it will respond to exercise with anxiety, and we will find ourselves not doing our workouts.
Do no more than 80% of maximum during exercise.
With consistency, the maximum, and the 80% of maximum, will increase dramatically.
Schedule out the week on Sunday evening.
Put it on paper.
Make appointments with yourself and keep them, just as one would an appointment with the doctor.

Then go kick some SEAL butt.
Buncha sailors, for Pete's sake.
Real men join the Marines and go Recon. :)
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
296
Good advice, Ken. I remember reading Dr. Schwartz's "heavyhands" book a few years back; he had a program of aerobics which involved using handweights, on the theory that involving the upper body in aerobic activity made for the best combination of cardiovascular fitness and upper-body strength. For instance, rowers, cross-country skiers, etc, tend to post the very highest VO2 MAX levels.

I digress, however; he said, "generally, the smallest, lightest body you can finess through life will be best for overall health."
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2001
Messages
571
as far as what they put you through BUD/S and while on duty; not for me to say- chris has handled that. http://www.navysealteams.com/Caracci.htm (his 4 part workout series)


as far as BUD/S qualifying fitness tests:
http://sealchallenge.navy.mil/buds.htm
and i imagine it gets worse from there. (i dunno... picture doing that and more for 5 days straight?)


and if the navy recommends it as BUD/S prep, i imagine it can't be TOO bad.
http://sealchallenge.navy.mil/workout.htm
http://sealchallenge.navy.mil/workoutcont.htm

it appears to be almost all endurance training. distance seems to be key in the specop missions that we hear about, and probably those that we don't. check out what happened in Mogadishu. Which do you think helped the Rangers and Delta survive: brute strength, or endurance?

You've got a primary and a side-arm. Brute strength will rarely gain anything. If you've gotta go to hands, you've got endurance on your opponent, you've got training, and you've got that dedication and tenaciousness that people seem to agree are common qualities in special forces. What if you need to move some 300 pound piece of equipment somewhere? Thats why its a SEAL team (emphasis on team, not SEAL). i'm sure you've heard the stories about log PT and carrying around an IBS all day, right? :)
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2001
Messages
2,600
thanks for all the info--this is why I love BF. Good people taking time out..thanks again
 
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Messages
482
Ken -

What great, common sense, clearly practiced insight and advice you gave all of us.

So good I copied it, printed it, and have put it under plastic in my workout book.

Thank you:)

It's been my experience over the years that the guys who hit the gym ultra hard do so because they enjoy that aspect of fitness and working out. Plus, the units now provide them with both the time and the facilities / equipment to pursue body building / shaping for all the right reasons.

Yet a far greater number of operators are content to pursue a fitness program much like what Ken describes. Balanced time and energy wise with other necessary daily activities, supplemented by a sound diet and rest, and geared toward long term fitness and durability over anything else.

This is especially important as you are injured and/or grow older.

The only time one could really be a gym rat was when you and your team was on "down time" at the flag pole. Serious deployments into primative or hostile environments of over 60 days would end up tearing you down pretty quickly. Working out was restricted to time available, and your interest in pumping anything (don't go there, fellas:rolleyes: ) after conducting mission related business 14 to 16 hours a day, 7 days a week. Physical training was most often some push-ups, sit-ups, a run and that was about it.

Once back at the flag pole you again had the luxury of becoming a gym rat, track rat, or whatever it was that flipped your switch.

Again, Ken's insight is superb. I'm very much into injury recovery and avoiding getting hurt by working out smartly these days as opposed to X-Treme bouts on the weight pile. Find a solid "peak" you can maintain for years and you'll be able to do anything anyone else can do...longer and injury free.
 
Joined
Mar 19, 1999
Messages
2,275
I like Ken's view! Although, I did buy my car because it will go very fast and not to impress others. I like to drive very fast for my own "amusement".:D
 
Joined
Aug 4, 1999
Messages
388
Great advice Ken, after 16 years of trying to kill myself with the weights I've reached a point where I need a more sensible approach to fitness. The joints just can't take it anymore. Flexibility and cardiovascular fitness are becoming far more important to me now. There's a place for weight training, IMO, it should be a small part of a total fitness program. If your going to weight train don't fall into the trap of chasing heavy lifts. Focus more on muscle endurance and full range of motion. A program that allows you to exercise consistently(free of injury induced layoffs) will get you a lot further in the long run.
 
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