serrations

whitty

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Aug 25, 2005
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We had such low sales on serrated knives that we only carry a few styles with serrations. Hopefully as we grow we will carry more but I have definitely noticed the majority of knife buyers prefer a plain edge!
 

bdmicarta

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Feb 16, 2012
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Years ago I bought a few combo edge knives because I thought they were the best of both worlds, but I don't ever recall cutting anything with the serrations. Today I only buy plain edge unless I have no choice.

I still believe that there might be things that are easier to cut with serrations but apparently I don't ever have to cut them.
 

SSonnentag

Stay Sharp!
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Feb 25, 2009
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Serrations cut faster and easier than a plain edge. If you don't mind the rough edges left behind and don't cut often enough to dull your knife, they're great. :) They're a pain to sharpen. If I had to rescue people from a burning vehicle and needed to cut through seatbelts, I'd like to have a fully-serrated blade. :D Other than that (and for slicing tomatoes) I much prefer a plain edge.
 

SSonnentag

Stay Sharp!
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Basically, a dull serrated knife will still cut things. A dull plain edge tends to slip off instead of cutting.
 
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Sep 3, 2012
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This has been a pretty balanced discussion so far. It has been basically said already but I will throw my .02 in. I don't think serrations are the most attractive addition to most knives, but I have found very little if anything that can be done with a plain edge, that can't be done just fine with a serrated edge. Go with your preference, but remember, when people say their sharp pe can do everything just as well, they're forgetting something.

That's where serrations really shine, is when they get dull. They will still cut/rip/tear. A dull pe just stops cutting. All you have to do is offer a challenge to those who say serrated knives can't keep up. A straight cutting competition with simllar sized blades, one se and one pe. No chopping, batonning, just cutting with a slicing motion, and see who lasts the longest. We'll throw in a few pieces of burlap, PVC, maybe some electrical wire, and see who comes out on top. You'll know who the winner is going to be every time.
 

jbmonkey

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Jun 9, 2011
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Doesnt apply to most of us....but most regular folks love their serrated for two reasons. They look mean....and the points work like a saw....so since these folks dont like to sharpen....the serrated can keep sawing tearing much longer than a dull plain edge.

I myself find little use for a serrated edge....on thick vines and such I just shave it through with a plain edge. I used to use a serrated but dig into something hard enough and watch those points bend. Now I use a saw when something is too thick for a pocket knife or smallee fixed blade. Too each their own though....
 
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Dec 2, 2012
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Why they invented sharpening stones/kits.

especially knife nuts, who probably prefer to sharpen their own knives.

But I agree, a serrated probably would last longer in that test.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2010
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I don't mind my FS H1 LadyBug, it cuts all out of proportion to it's size, very impressive. Cardboard, tape, and rope/string don't stand a chance, but it's lackluster when it comes to finer tasks like whittling.
 

JD Spydo

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Nov 20, 2004
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First and foremost not all serrated edged knives are created equal by any means. There are certainly many serrated edged knives on the market that are pure trash and I know that first hand through trial and error. But back in 1995 when I purchased my very first Spyderco serrated/Spyderedged folder ( Stainless handled MARINER model with a sheepsfoot serrated blade) I immediately saw a huge difference between their great serrated edges and most of the others on the open market.

Now I'm not saying that Spyderco is the only production knife company with decent serrated edges by any means but I've certainly had great luck with all the serrated Spyders I've owned and used up to this point in time. I've owned 2 great Benchmade models with combo edges and their wavy type serrated edge on their combo edged blades really work great for me.

But there is something special about Spyderco's Spyderedged blades and I can't stress enough that if many of you would give them a chance I think you would be pleasantly surprised. Particularly in Spyderco's H-1 Salt Series is some of their best serrated blades. Now not all of Spyderco's great serrated blades have the same pattern either. Because I have one of their older Catcherman models with an AUS-8 fully serrated blade and they didn't make many of them and they are hard to find. The older full SE CAtcherman has some low profile, wavy type serrations that are similar to the ones that come on many of their culinary full SE kitchen blades.

I have one of the older Spyderco first generation Temperance 1 models ( fixed blade) in full SE which is nothing short of a beast of a knife. And it can cut/saw through just about anything that steel can cut through.

Most of the serrations that Spyderco has on many of their folders are a spikey type serration with scallops between the spikes. They are relatively easy to sharpen compared to many other serrated blades on the open market and they perform really well. Spyderco truly has taken the serrated edge to another level and their quality on most all of their blades ( fixed and folders) are about as good as you can get on the production knife market. If any company has serrations that can compete with Spyderco I would sure like to know about them. Great thread guys.
 

cchu518

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Mar 6, 2013
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I have to agree with JD not all serrations are created equal. My last combo edge was a cheap Gerber knockoff branded Sheffield that I picked up from home depot. The serrations sucked on that model compared to the benchmade. For utility tasks good combo edges work really well. Not so well on the delicate stuff. I edc a slipjoint for those tasks but for yardwork and such the ce is perfectly suited!
 
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Apr 1, 2013
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I do and love a fully serrated edge. In fact, I carried a fully serrated Para and Endura for years. There is nothing that I could not do with plain edge, that I cannot also do with a fully serrated knife.

love the full para, loads of fun and versatility, i used mine before swapping it as a camp knife. could to everything you asked of it. I could even trim my nails really well with it
 
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Dec 1, 2010
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I'm a big fan of the plain edge, but I reach for my Endura with combo edge when I have to cut through tough plant stems in the garden. The serrations go through the really tough stuff that can be trouble for even my razor sharp plain edges.

Joe
 

JD Spydo

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Nov 20, 2004
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I'm a big fan of the plain edge, but I reach for my Endura with combo edge when I have to cut through tough plant stems in the garden. The serrations go through the really tough stuff that can be trouble for even my razor sharp plain edges.

Joe

You're spot on there "Frisky" and don't forget how great serrated edges are for stringy and fibrous materials like rope, cordage, leather and polymers of all types.

The Spyderedged blades in particular literally have a type of sawing action that can just about cut through anything. Fully serrated Hawkbill blades I find to be about the best for all kinds of rough cutting. Also Spyderco has 2 fully serrated models that work great for really tough jobs. The fully serrated NATIVE ( if you can still find one) and the original full SE Dodo model are both short bladed bulldogs when using for tough cutting jobs.

The original full SE Police model is Spyderco's stalwart full serrated edge blade and truly sets the standard of the knife industry. And do keep your eyes out for the upcoming Sprint model C-44, VG-10 Dyad model which has a wicked clip point plain edged blade and a full sized, sheepsfoot serrated blade all on one great folder. I think it's Spyderco's best all time working blade.
 

JD Spydo

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Nov 20, 2004
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Spyderco's serrated Hawkbill blades for instance are truly the best you can get for any type of "pull cutting" job. At one time I worked in an automotive modification shop and I encountered many different types of rough cutting chores and with my full SE 440V Spyderco Native and my G-10, ATS-55 Harpy I was able to complete all of them with little or no problem at all.

Spyderco's kitchen/culinary line in full SE are about the very best you can get without going into chef's knives that cost $400+. But again Spyderco's H-1 Salt Series has all kinds of fully serrated blades that are designed for hard and rugged cutting jobs.

Many people shy away from serrated blades because they feel they don't have the skill or talent to sharpen them. But I'm here to tell you that at one time I was sort of that way myself>> but after aquiring many of Spyderco's great sharpening tools I found serrated blades not that hard to sharpen at all. Because Spyderco has many sharpening tools which do a great job on serrated blades. They are a bit more time consuming to sharpen but they don't need sharpening nearly as much as a plain edged blade does.

I can't stress enough that if you do elect to check out serrated knives of any brand that you please stick with the higher end brand names like Spyderco and some of the German and Japanese made culinary knives have many serrated models that will serve you well.
 

Rhinoknives1

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Jul 1, 2013
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If you want to cut bread of anything else that requires sawing, Serrations are the way to go!
Also for the Soldier in the field that may only have a rock to sharpen their knife. Serrations have a place.

Like others have said, not all serrations are created equal. Emerson serrations work fine for a soldier. Benchmade & Spyderco also have very good ones.

I personally don't care for serrations on anything other than a bread knife and I can touch a plain edge quite easily.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2013
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After my first post I had some Florida yard work to do so I decided to try some all-straight edge knives on my job of green palm fronds instead of the serrated knives I would normally use( from experience) on palm, which if you've never cut it, is extremely fibrous, springy, resistant and generally tough to cut with slicing versus sawing. Especially when the frond is green and wet and still 'alive'.

So I used my straight edge KaBar USMC's, 7", versus the identical KaBar USMC 7 inchers with the back half of the blade serrated. Identical knives, only difference the serration.
Both got the job done. But the serrated blades did the palm cuts much, much easier than the straights. No contest.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
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3,010
CRKT Veff Serrations slice like no other. They are a one of a kind style, though, and they modified them recently. Only used the original style, so I can speak for them only. The cut rope, strap, plant material (saplings and vines), and, ahem, fleshy materials, like no other serrations I've used.

I have an Endura SE that is my go to work edge, and go to SD blade (again, back to the the fibrous and fleshy materials). Plus, damage done with a SE is a bit worse even with a glancing cut, as it adds a nice little tear as well as a slice. Not that knives are weapons. Neither are tire irons, though.
 
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Aug 24, 2007
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I never liked a serrated blade until I was recently educated on them. I love them now. They are just wicked at slicing and cutting.
But, I like the PE also.
 
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Sep 29, 2009
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I like my all SE Spyderco UKPK Rescue, because the serrations give it a nice grab and cut effect. It works extremely well for cutting things that I can't hold taut with my free hand. Also eats cardboard alive, and works very well on plants. I find that with most of my PE blades, I have to grab on end of the plant and pull it taut then slice/saw with the edge, but with my SE, I can just flick my wrist and it snaps right off. My Spyderco Cricket PE does it pretty good too, but A) its very small, and B) it is pretty much a giant serration itself.

I don't like serrations for the finer work I usually am using knives for, but for just cutting up stuff that needs to be cut and not necessarily sliced prettily, serrations are boss!
 
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