serrations

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Aug 29, 2013
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Hey guys I personaly have never found much of a use for serrations on a knife because I figure, why not just use the easier slicing blade. Some people say its better for cutting rope but I haven't had trouble cutting rope with a plain edge. Do you ever use the serrations on your combo edge blades? Do you think they work better? Any thoughts?:p
Haven't read any of the other posts but I look at this as "very likely you do not sharpen your own blades". Serrations work great on otherwise-dull blades by virtue of turning them into a quasi-saw. Folks will argue with me on this but I will stand my ground. A sharp knife can do anything that a semi-sharp serrated blade can do BUT a straight blade at least can be re-sharpened whereas a saw tooth version is gonna be a SOB to clean up no matter how talented you think you are. I don't buy serrated knives only because I know who is going to be maintaining them.
Having said all that I do appreciate the cutting ability of the cheapie (hey and sometimes expensive) plastic-handled stainless serrated steak knives that appear in my kitchen drawers. Everybody is happy, I don't have to sharpen them and they can go straight off into the dishwasher after use and right into the garbage can as soon as someone tells me they're dull.
 

Kels73

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Feb 20, 2012
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If I were a rescue worker, I'd definitely experiment with a knife with a fully serrated safety blade. I think it would do well cutting through things like seatbelts and clothing very quickly in an emergency roadside scenario. For my uses though, I prefer a plain edge.
 
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Sep 29, 2009
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Haven't read any of the other posts but I look at this as "very likely you do not sharpen your own blades". Serrations work great on otherwise-dull blades by virtue of turning them into a quasi-saw. Folks will argue with me on this but I will stand my ground. A sharp knife can do anything that a semi-sharp serrated blade can do BUT a straight blade at least can be re-sharpened whereas a saw tooth version is gonna be a SOB to clean up no matter how talented you think you are. I don't buy serrated knives only because I know who is going to be maintaining them.
Having said all that I do appreciate the cutting ability of the cheapie (hey and sometimes expensive) plastic-handled stainless serrated steak knives that appear in my kitchen drawers. Everybody is happy, I don't have to sharpen them and they can go straight off into the dishwasher after use and right into the garbage can as soon as someone tells me they're dull.

I would amend that to "freehand sharpen on traditional stones," as I sharpen with a Spyderco Sharpmaker, and it does serrations with ease. It will eventually start to grind down the serrations, and it doesn't do it pretty, but it keeps em going really well.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2013
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Another option to have the best of both worlds is a SAK like the Fireman model, which comes with both an all-straight edge and a separate all-serrated blade.
I just got one. I love it, great for camping, check it out. Around $30 on eBay.
 

SOLEIL

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Mar 20, 2006
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Haven't read any of the other posts but I look at this as "very likely you do not sharpen your own blades". Serrations work great on otherwise-dull blades by virtue of turning them into a quasi-saw. Folks will argue with me on this but I will stand my ground. A sharp knife can do anything that a semi-sharp serrated blade can do BUT a straight blade at least can be re-sharpened whereas a saw tooth version is gonna be a SOB to clean up no matter how talented you think you are. I don't buy serrated knives only because I know who is going to be maintaining them.
Having said all that I do appreciate the cutting ability of the cheapie (hey and sometimes expensive) plastic-handled stainless serrated steak knives that appear in my kitchen drawers. Everybody is happy, I don't have to sharpen them and they can go straight off into the dishwasher after use and right into the garbage can as soon as someone tells me they're dull.

I guess you have never heard of the Lansky Dogbone sharpeners specifically made for serrated edges? Also made for specific serrated edge patterns? How about sharpening the back side of the serrated edge for a quick touch up? How about the thousands of smaller oval or round diamond, ceramic, glass inexpensive rods that can be used? Serrated edges are easy. To each his own. It's all good.
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2013
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I just have to post this, its just so badass-looking!

Spyderco Civilian fully serrated:
65942d1350876648-blade-week-civilian.jpg

3301565475_7cf4033998_o.jpg
 

SOLEIL

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Mar 20, 2006
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Yes, they are nice. Check out the full size Matriarch, same blade design but not quite as long. The tip is stronger and it can be used in more applications without fear of snapping it off. I have carried one for years and use it extensively at work and play.
 
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Sep 7, 2011
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My general preference is towards plain edges because maintenance is easier, and making "clean" cuts does have a certain appeal. I'm generally not a fan of combo edges because it seems I end up with not enough length of either (I generally carry 3" or shorter blades).

I have been trying out a fully serrated Delica recently though. While it doesn't make the nice, neat cuts, it does cut/tear into material very well. One other nice thing I've observed is that the "teeth" on the serrations area pretty handy when cutting tape off boxes. Rather than making the initial puncture with the tip, you can just use any part of the cutting edge. Similar benefit when removing plastic wrap covering an entire pallet of boxes.

Delica_SE_20131022_800x337.jpg
 

kwick72

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Apr 17, 2013
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My presonal taste is plain edge I have yet to need a serrated edge in my EDC tasks. The look of a plain edge is just cleaner.
 

JD Spydo

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Nov 20, 2004
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Great Pics of that Spyderco Civilian model Brother :) But I do prefer the smaller Matriarch model just a bit better because it just seems more natural in my hand. The Civilian and the Matriarch were both fully intended and primarily designed solely for self defense and were originally target marketed to the law enforcement community.

I like Spyderco's serrated Hawkbills the best myself because of their ability to cut extremely rough stuff fast and efficient. Now there was one of Spyderco's "Reverse S" style blades I loved for work and that is the Dodo model.

There are many outdoor cutting jobs I like serrated edges for. One is for cleaning and processing fish and for field dressing different animals. If people would give serrated edges a fair trial I believe that there would be many more users of them. Most people are intimidated by what they perceive as being hard to sharpen and maintain. But with the right sharpening equipment they aren't hard to sharpen at all.

When it comes to kitchen and culinary knives I have many more serrated blades than I do plain edges. I've also talked to many guys who are work on commercial fishing vessels and other seafaring jobs who also like serrated Hawkbills a lot. Most people just won't give them a fair trial and most people think that all serrations are pretty much the same which is totally false. Serrated blades are like any other knife>> you get what you pay for.
 

cchu518

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Mar 6, 2013
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I use a lansky dogbone solely for my ce and all serrated edges, works great. Takes a bit of time to work each serration individually but you don't have to do it very often!

If we'really talking kitchen cutlery too I have another five fully serrated. I won't cut bread without my serrated bread knife. I also have a pie cutter spatula tool with one of its sides serrated works great! I haven't touched up the bread knife or pie tool in 9 years and they are still ridiculously sharp die to the fact that they aren't used often or hard.
 
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Nov 9, 2009
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One additional point, a serrated edge is "chisel ground", and has a much lower edge angle (thinner & sharper) than a standard plain edge. The concave shape of the serration also lends strength to the cutting area.
 
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May 7, 2013
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I keep a couple of combo knives around for specific jobs. I don't much care for serrations in my personal knives - mostly due to looks. The serrations break the clean line of the knife edge. So, I keep a couple of serrated knives and haven't bought another in a very long time. Just a tool with a function that comes in handy sometimes. When I need one, I'm glad I have a couple to choose from.

Nothing wrong with them, just personal preference.

...I won't cut bread without my serrated bread knife. I also have a pie cutter spatula tool with one of its sides serrated works great! I haven't touched up the bread knife or pie tool in 9 years and they are still ridiculously sharp die to the fact that they aren't used often or hard.

Absolutely. We have a Victorinox serrated bread knife that goes through warm home baked bread (we rarely eat store bought) like butter. Like you, we've never sharpened it as there hasn't been a need for us to do so. The rest of our current kitchen knives are plain edged.

I will admit that when I got my Sharpmaker, I drug out a couple of old (30+ years!) serrated kitchen knives and put edges on them. Easy to do with the Sharpmaker. Then they went back in the drawer as they were cheap knives bought back when that was all we could afford and we really don't use them anymore.
 
Joined
Jul 4, 2009
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i have always liked using combo edged folders; my favorite is a combo edged kershaw select fire...they cut fast...they stay in "cutting" condition a long time...and i got an apex pro kit and a sharpmaker, so i know how to sharpen; i just don't make knife sharpening my hobby or obsession...

i'd say half my folders are combo edged (including zt200st, zt350st, ETst, hest T3)...shoot, if the xm18 was CE i'd probably use it more...
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2006
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230
I would think that sharpening a plain edge with a rough grit stone without progressing to a finer grit would give you an edge with micro-serrations that would be effective for sawing through fibrous material.
 

zl1

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Nov 24, 2012
Messages
1,138
I would think that sharpening a plain edge with a rough grit stone without progressing to a finer grit would give you an edge with micro-serrations that would be effective for sawing through fibrous material.
Definitely gives a plain edge a nice bite
 

JD Spydo

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Nov 20, 2004
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There is a secret to sharpening serrated Edges. Well I'll put it this way it works on 100% of Spyderco's serrrated blades. But on the other hand I've never had it fail on any serrated edge I used the tool on. Spyderco used to have a sharpening kit called the 701 Profiles (medium & fine stones in one kit). The stones are unique in that they have 2 completely different degreeed radii and 2 different degree corners. These 701 Profiles get just about any serrated edged blades so sharp you just can't believe it. They are currently not being made available by Spyderco but I'm sure you all can find a set because many dealers out there still have them on their shelves as of now.

Now Spyderco's 204 Sharpmaker is also a good system for sharpening serrated edged blades but I like the 701 Profiles even better. I think at some point Spyderco will bring back the 701 Profiles because their newest sharpening tool that is supposed to be capable of sharpening any type edge which is called the Goldenstone is not really selling well from what I've been told. They claim that the Goldenstone will sharpen anything that the 701 Profiles will sharpen>> but you can only get the Goldenstone in "fine".

One Brother mentioned the Lansky Dogbone sharpener. I've personally never used one but he isn't the only person I've heard say good things about. I have other Lansky tools I like however. DMT has some conical files that I've also found to be useful for serrated edges as well.

So none of you now can use the excuse about sharpening being a problem because you can do it with the right tools and a little practice. >> JD
 
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