Stropsanity: Compounds, Substrates, and the Godstones

RadialBladeworks

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
465
Let's talk about stropping

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First off, a question:
How and why do you like to strop?


Hard Strops for Apex Deburring

I don't like deburring on the stone. A good stone is abrasive and fast, therefore raising your angle up and attacking the very apex is going to want to instantly raise a burr. Personally, no matter how light I go, I am unsatisfied. Instead, finishing up on the stone, I will switch sides a few times and sharpen at my original angle as lightly as possible. This does well to minimize the burr.

After that, I need something to actually fully clean up my apex with. I don't use edge-leading strokes for deburring, so this inherently means I am on to stropping as a deburring method. For this, I like a hard strop, so as not to round over my edge. I raise my angle a little during these strokes, so using a soft strop is not a great idea here.

zuGNw4N.jpg


My first deburring hard strops were the Spyderco UF, Fine, Medium, and the Norton India Fine. I purchased all of these because they afforded me a range of specific apex finishes. I noticed that stropping the burr off on leather (a soft strop--not necessarily an optimal primary deburring tool) on, say, a 220, or 400 grit edge, where even after significant burr reduction you still had stubborn remnants to deal with, you ended up doing so much stropping that you ended up polishing your edge higher than a pure 220. Multiple apex stones was my original solution, but over time I found there was a simpler solution which I'll get to later.

Anyway, that all ends up being a tad expensive just for a collection of specifically dedicated deburring stones. I mean, you can sharpen with them too, but I personally found them to be far from the best for that.

So check out my collection of freakin' dope budget deburring "stones"

GoGkcWq.jpg


Green buffing compound, black grinding compound, MDF. I got 2 total pounds of compound and 8 cuts of 12x2.5" MDF for $20CAD, and our dollar isn't worth shit! So you can deburr effectively for very cheap. Let me add a few notes so as to make your MDF strop feel a little more premium.

First, I bought primed MDF so all of my other sides are covered in white primer. Be sure to sand off the excess primer you see there before applying the compound to the stropping surface.

Second, throw some rubber feet on it so it stays put:
aAe0gmk.jpg


Third, my strops are wearing a lengthwise 120 grit sanding pattern which is not optimal. To maximize your deburring aggression, I recommend you sand with something like 60 grit paper widthwise:

DCS9c6V.jpg


This will produce little ridges perpendicular to your stroke which will hold the compound better and attack your burr more effectively, making the process faster.

Why did I choose the above stones?

I chose the aforementioned stones because they are all extremely hard, they basically do not wear, and they cut relatively slowly which minimizes microbevel growth.

A few high angle stropping passes with a light touch on these implements and that burr is essentially obliterated.

Essentially.

Afterwards, I still like to do some final edge cleaning because undoubtedly there is some microscopic burring left on that apex from the high passes. I may not be able to see it, but I suspect it is there nonetheless.

For this, I like to strop on either 1 to 0.5 micron compound, or even completely bare leather. For this step, I strop at my original angle, not my apex angle on a soft strop, not hard. Using a soft strop such as bare leather, I let the slight flex of the strop conform to my edge and clean it all up nicely.

Generally, this process results in something to this effect:
GsFBRh3.jpg


Soft Strops for Edge Bevel and Apex Refinement and Refreshment

yzMZHp5.jpg

(Bullshit artsy shot of some new aluminum-backed strops I made)

Stropping compounds allow you to clean up your edge and remove burrs and generally greatly enhance the results of your sharpening efforts as a final step. The one and half micron pastes above are fantastic for that. However, that stuff is so fine that if you put any significant wear on your blade (yet still don't need a full-on sharpening session), you'll be stropping for days to feel any real improvement. The time investment simply becomes impractical. To circumnavigate this issue, you can employ lower grit stropping compounds.

Woodstock's black grinding compound is a great cheap option that I have used a lot. It is low grit enough to apply a hazy finish to your edge, so something like 1-3k grit. Maybe, like, 10 micron average or something like that. I don't know precisely.

Diamond pastes are also phenomenal options, like the ones seen above, and they are available in a ridiculous range of grit sizes. You can get them for quite cheap and can find them in basically any grit you'd like. If you want to restore a well-used edge that doesn't quite need a full sharpening, consider grabbing some 10 micron compound to quickly get your edge back to crazy sharp.

PgXJbyd.jpg


The blade above is wearing a lightly used 800 grit edge. The knife itself is a D2 Boker Hitman, a fantastic budget option. Try as I might, that edge was whittling no hairs, but it was also still in good enough condition that I was reluctant to hit the stones.

I intended to turn that around by refreshing the edge with some 6, 3, and 1 micron diamond paste.
mV6Kdc3.jpg

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After stropping for just a couple minutes, I wound up with a nice milky mirror. And then I finished on some heavily oiled bare leather, just to really clean 'er up.

q3VBRED.jpg


And the result?

89jiyI5.jpg


Notice how my soft stropping effected the entire edge bevel? That is no longer an 800 grit edge. That is more like a 5k edge, so its performance has changed drastically. It is now more of a pushcutter than a drawcutter.

This is why I don't recommend deburring with excessive soft-stropping. You may end up with a hair whittling 220 edge, for example, but it isn't really a 220 grit edge anymore. So if you require a specific grit edge for a certain performance factor (like a toothy bastard of an edge for lots of rope cutting), use a hard strop to set your apex. If you strop excessively, in a sense, it is merely really slow sharpening. Make sure you aren't altering the effective grit of your edge with too many stropping strokes.

That being said, if you recall, I have forty micron diamond paste, so if you can't stand hard strops, and really want to maintain a toothy edge, you can pick up some of that badass paste and soft strop to a seriously toothy edge (just make sure you don't round over that apex!). I have 40, 28, 20, 14, and 10 micron compounds for deburring and refreshing low grit edges without altering the specific edge finish. This stuff works like magic. It's so effective, it feels like you're cheating. Just, again, remember that even the stiff leather that I use will flex, so be super careful you don't round off your apex.

Stones So Good It Feels Like You're Cheating

Dz2y3Rv.jpg


Remember my overkill hard-stropping stone collection that I bought? Yeah, they were a waste of money.

Turns out if you deburr on a fine enough stone it doesn't actually alter the effective grit of your edge. That is, if you set a 400 grit edge then deburr on a Shapton 16k, the edge will be refined, yet still perform like a 400 grit edge. This allows you to avoid the performance change induced by over-stropping.

The Shapton 30k and Gokumyo 20k half micron stones are so damn good at this, I deburred that S90V Manly Peak and it was easily whittling hairs without even doing any clean-up stropping on bare leather.

But I still cleaned up on bare leather anyway...

8k is what I would call the bare minimum for this kind of apex cleaning. Any lower and you will basically just start applying a visible microbevel, which is fine, but if that microbevel gets too large, it will start altering the performance of your edge, so if you need a low grit drawcutting edge, you may begin to experience a decline in the performance you're looking for.

Make Your Own Strop And Join The Party

Wanna know how to make your own strop?
https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/the-stroppening.1561184/

That being said, there are a few points I want to clarify with making your own strops:
- First, if you use wood backing, spend the time and sand your surface perfectly flat
- Second, I use thicker 8-9oz veg tanned leather because, ironically, it is very stiff. There is a lot more involved in the stiffness of leather than simply the thickness. Generally I find thinner leathers, because of the way they have been treated, actually flex the most, although it may not seem like it.
- Third, using thicker leather allows you to literally sand it flat. There are imperfections within the flesh that can be felt in your stroke. Use 60 grit paper to quickly sand the leather flat, then surface finish it with 220 grit paper, then rub the shit out of it with a strip of denim to clean out the fibers and bring out a nice suede.

V66NOIc.jpg

vzgAL5J.jpg

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And now that your strop bases are sanded flat, your leather substrate itself is sanded flat, and you have a nice nappy suede finish, its time to play with some compounds!

8VntdZb.jpg
 
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Joined
May 11, 2012
Messages
785
Where can I get those round plastic boxes with diamond paste? Got a link or exact search term for it?

And how much did you spend on all the stropping related products, the $$$ total?
 

RadialBladeworks

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
465
K kreisler
Those are Kent Supplies diamond pastes. Got them on Amazon. They are a Canadian company, so it was nice to finally support my own nation lol. I bought 2 sets for a total of, like, 20 or 25 20g containers. Costed like $150CAD, but it's a shitload of compound.

I don't even know how much I ended up spending on everything, but I do know that the setup I have built is absolute gross overkill lol. If I wasn't an enthusiast, I wouldn't have more than 4 strops: a coarse, medium, fine, and bare. Short answer: hundreds
 

RadialBladeworks

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Joined
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Messages
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RadialBladeworks RadialBladeworks
Your post is so real good, that I've saved it to PDF for reference.
You've explained everything so all-round-perfectly, your "artsy shots" are so wonderful, that I'll be surprised to see anyone raising more questions about stropping on this forum after your post.

Thanks for the feedback man! Glad you found the article useful. Yeah, stropping is a dynamic technique. Lot of fun to put to use, that's for sure haha
 
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
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I felt compelled to post and thank you for this post. This was the most well thought out, informative post I've read on any topic in quite some time.

Stropping technique is a dynamic and tricky thing indeed. I've always struggled to maintain the consistency needed to not round off and screw up my edges. For me, Edge Pro strops have been a godsend. Currently I use .5 micron diamond paste on a balsa strop followed by the same paste on Kangaroo leather. I should probably pick up another Kangaroo leather strop to use bare as a final step.

(PS, I have one other thing to thank you for. I'm showing this post to my wife the next time she accuses me of being obsessed with sharpening.)
 

RadialBladeworks

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
465
I felt compelled to post and thank you for this post. This was the most well thought out, informative post I've read on any topic in quite some time.

Stropping technique is a dynamic and tricky thing indeed. I've always struggled to maintain the consistency needed to not round off and screw up my edges. For me, Edge Pro strops have been a godsend. Currently I use .5 micron diamond paste on a balsa strop followed by the same paste on Kangaroo leather. I should probably pick up another Kangaroo leather strop to use bare as a final step.

(PS, I have one other thing to thank you for. I'm showing this post to my wife the next time she accuses me of being obsessed with sharpening.)

Haha yeah if she still isn't convinced, send me a message; I'll snap a pic of my stone collection for you

Yeah, I really liked the 'roo EP strops. I used those with with a couple CBN sprays. I even used them freehand a few times because I didn't like setting up my EP just to do a little stropping. Actually worked pretty well. I would definitely recommend a bare strop, I use one very often, and, I mean, can you ever have too large a sharpening arsenal? :D

Thanks for the kind words, man
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
361
How and why do you like to strop?
How? Strops that shall not be named (or STSNBN for short) with 600 grit compound. (I'm working on it, slowly but surely) It takes the stubborn super small burr and evens it out

Why? Because I don't have the patience to deburr on the sharpmaker because I'm on a reprofiling kick right now

TIL that you can have a collection of stropping compounds as well as knives lol. Great job! Thank you for going into so much detail.
 

RadialBladeworks

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
465
How? Strops that shall not be named (or STSNBN for short) with 600 grit compound. (I'm working on it, slowly but surely) It takes the stubborn super small burr and evens it out

Why? Because I don't have the patience to deburr on the sharpmaker because I'm on a reprofiling kick right now

TIL that you can have a collection of stropping compounds as well as knives lol. Great job! Thank you for going into so much detail.

How exactly do you go about stropping on that compound? What form is it in? Dry? Paste?

I have long wanted to simply use 400-1200 grit lapping grits in powder form simply because they are so ridiculously cheap and you have full control of your abrasive density, but I didn't like using them dry, and various attempts at supplying my own matrix (typically petrol jelly and thick oils) never really panned out satisfactorily. I know of a company that makes a lapping grease, which is basically those powders suspended in bearing grease, but after so many failed attempts, I have been hesitant to grab some
 
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Joined
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Messages
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How exactly do you go about stropping on that compound? What form is it in? Dry? Paste? I have long wanted to simply use 400-1200 grit lapping grits in powder form simply because they are so ridiculously cheap and you have full control of your abrasive density, but I didn't like using them dry, and various attempts at supplying my own matrix (typically petrol jelly and thick oils) never really panned out satisfactorily. I know of a company that makes a lapping grease, which is basically those powders suspended in bearing grease, but after so many failed attempts, I have been hesitant to grab some

TLDR: IMO because the compound that I use did not dry out, I believe that you can just put it on leather as is (try it on smaller strips first if you buy it;)) Also I have not used any jelly/oils because of what the STSNBN are made of.

To answer your question, it was a Woodstock Extra Fine Green big 1lb stick. It's rated for 400-600 grit. It is just a giant crayon that I take and color, and it feels like I'm a kid again because I put it on giant surfaces and then cut those down for travel size. (Marines, this doesn't taste as good as Crayola lol) I keep it in a big Ziploc so it doesn't dry out, because I did get the 1000 grit version dry, and it ruined all of the work that I did on the 600 grit.

My experience on the one leather strop that I ruined (explanation below) with my knife is that it works just as well as my STSNBN. Because I keep it in good condition, I applied it to the rough side and it sort of did its work (?) I am still working out on how much to cake the surface (I notice that for me, caking does not make it either better or worse). Keep in mind that these are supposed to be used on paper/ cotton buffing wheels, so caking it might be desirable.

(Ruined the strop by trying to scrape some undesired 1000 grit super dry compound with the knife edge, yes I'm not a smart man, and yes I'm looking all over the house for some sandpaper)

Overall, the size of the brick and low grit allow me to make portable strops that I can just throw away. It's an amazing compound that just slaps the burrs off the knives and has revived my low end knives over and over (but then again, I shouldn't cut down pizza boxes with my micro recon 1).

As for my newb technique? Take the knife, line up the angle, and slap it 10 times over or until you see the green compound turning black. Switch sides, repeat.
 
Joined
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Even the best threads don't get bumped often enough! This is the reference thread on strops imho. Anywho the other day i came across a great inexpensive source of wood strops. The wood's hardness is between balsa (soft) and basswood (hard) and the finish is nicely smooth and fortunately not polish-smooth. One pack contains a set of six paint stirring staffs which can be used as strops once loaded with compound.


The pack costs EUR0.68 lol:p in local Action Shops.

Applying a hard wax-based polishing compound (hard paste) is similar to preparing a PTS paper tape strop, just without the paper tape:
  1. Distribute fine crumbs of the hard compound along the wood,
  2. Possibly crush-rub them with your index finger on the wood surface,
  3. Place one drop of oil on your index finger,
  4. Rub the finger over the compound/crumbs on the wood surface again, now dissolving the compound through the oil and rubbing the "liquefied" paste into the wood finish,
  5. That's it, no need to wait or let dry. You can start stropping!
Applying a compound (diamond paste, diamond spray, diamond emulsion, jeweller's rouge, SiC paste, industrial-grade polishing compound, etc) on a smooth balsa wood surface for stropping purposes is nothing new; wood accepts compound pretty well. The point of my post was to share the info that wooden paint stirring staffs can be conveniently used as such strops, they even have handles! They're inexpensive, do not need much compound (unlike paper tape strops!), and can be reused several times for multiple stropping sessions, before you decide to bin the "11 Eurocent strop" ( 0.68 ÷ 6 = 0.113 ) and prepare a fresh one. (In contrast, a paper tape strop can be used for the 1 current session only, because the oil gets soaked into the balsa holder leaving a semi-effective stropping tape.)

If you already have experience with stropping on wood (like balsa or basswood), then you probably like this budget-friendly alternative. On a side note, paper tape is not needed here as intermediary because this type of smooth yet micro-textured wood finish accepts the compound well enough and provides a stropping surface without give (similar to basswood), if that's what you're after.

Just note that the preferred stropping technique with this staff is "techniqueA" :cool:, and not your standard stropping technique ("techniqueB").

I like it! :thumbsup:
 
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RadialBladeworks

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Apr 15, 2014
Messages
465
Even the best threads don't get bumped often enough! This is the reference thread on strops imho. Anywho the other day i came across a great inexpensive source of wood strops. The wood's hardness is between balsa (soft) and basswood (hard) and the finish is nicely smooth and fortunately not polish-smooth. One pack contains a set of six paint stirring staffs which can be used as strops once loaded with compound.
2568458_8718964039036-110.png

The pack costs EUR0.68 lol:p in local Action Shops.

Applying a hard wax-based polishing compound (hard paste) is similar to preparing a PTS paper tape strop, just without the paper tape:
  1. Distribute fine crumbs of the hard compound along the wood,
  2. Possibly crush-rub them with your index finger on the wood surface,
  3. Place one drop of oil on your index finger,
  4. Rub the finger over the compound/crumbs on the wood surface again, now dissolving the compound through the oil and rubbing the "liquefied" paste into the wood finish,
  5. That's it, no need to wait or let dry. You can start stropping!
Applying a compound (diamond paste, diamond spray, jeweller's rouge, SiC paste, etc) on a smooth wood surface for stropping purposes is nothing new; wood accepts compound pretty well. The point of my post was to share the info that paint stirring staffs can be conveniently used as such strops, they even have handles! They're inexpensive, do not need much compound (unlike paper tape strops!), and can be reused several times for multiple stropping sessions, before you decide to bin the "11 Eurocent strop" ( 0.68 ÷ 6 = 0.113 ) and prepare a fresh one. (In contrast, a paper tape strop can be used for the 1 current session only, because the oil gets soaked into the balsa holder leaving a semi-effective stropping tape.)

If you already have experience with stropping on wood (like balsa or basswood), then you probably like this budget-friendly alternative. On a side note, paper tape is not needed here as intermediary because this type of smooth yet micro-textured wood finish accepts the compound well enough and provides a stropping surface without give (similar to basswood), if that's what you're after.

I like it! :thumbsup:


The disposable nature of this is awesome. I like to polish bevels with metal polish, but maintaining a single, reusable strop of metal polish is quite messy. This would let you just one, two, or three time use the thing and toss 'er. :thumbsup:
 

RadialBladeworks

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
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Messages
465
You have two sets; is one water-base and one oil-base? Which do you prefer?

Both of them are oil based, I just doubled-up on my order so I had a lot on hand.

However, I have used both water-based and oil-based compounds and I generally prefer oil-based pastes over everything else. It stays "wet" allowing me to really work a small amount into the leather most easily. I've also used water sprays then lubricated them with oil for the application procedure, but that just adds one more step. And regarding sprays, I don't like how much of it deflects off the strop and into the air.

So: oil pastes>oil emulsions>water emulsions>water sprays
 
Joined
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Messages
785
I saw people NORTHWEST_KNIFE_GUY NORTHWEST_KNIFE_GUY :thumbsup: successfully "treating" their leather strop with sandpaper, mostly for resurfacing the smooth side of the leather. Sanding the leather on a flat backplate would also mean-flatten the leather/strop, nice idea! My inexpensive commercial CN strop, which i had been using for various tests/experiments/mounts, was just perfect for trying the sandpaper treatment, because my scrap leather on it wasn't mean flat, so i was looking forward to trying the whole thing out. If the sanding test failed, i could simply order a new CN strop.
Well, i failed:
img_20200522_102518vdj6q.jpg

I didn't get far. Didn't get to the sanding part. Here is what happened:
As mentioned, the surface wasn't mean flat. Moreover, the leather strop was loaded with compound, plenty of waxy SiC compound. I had to scrape off the compound first, before i could start the sanding, right? Otherwise the sanding/paper would have become a mess. But how do you scrape off gunk with a scraper (edge-following or edge-leading) if the surface isn't flat, plane? You doht, can't. Before i could scrape off the compound from the "valleys", i had to cut down the "peaks" from the "leatherscape";). Edge-leading scraping got me only so far, cutting flakes out of the leather surface. And the more/deeper i cut, the grainier the surface got. At this point i realized that i had just ruined the homogeneous smooth surface texture and a few scraper miscuts later the entire leather was fully ruined. 'To **ll:poop: with the scrap leather', 'i can glue on a new fresh piece of leather', i thought. So i tried to remove the leather from the wooden handle. That was a fail too. The Stanley cutter could cut off the leather but there's no way to get the glue off the wood face in an acceptable manner. Basically i am saying, if you use glue to mount a piece of leather on sideA of your double-sided wood strop and a year later you discard the leather, then you can't use sideA anymore for mounting a new piece of leather on it, because the hard-to-remove glue residue on the wood ruins the (re-usability of the) wood side. So for all my future leather wood strop builds i will be applying double-sided adhesive tape, e.g. carpet tape, instead of glue. Not that i exchange the leather regularly but there will be unfortunate mishaps when you do want to exchange the leather (or want to try a new leather type) without letting the wood/handle go to waste. Tape has some potential disadvantages but

I am trashing now the ruined wood strop, even though sideB is 100% flat/smooth/mint/usable. I got the product 3.5yrs ago time flies:confused:, it looks ugly by now, and it's time to let go or move on. I've ordered a new one, US$3.68 shipped lol from AX. It's not a great strop (the leather is too thin and imho not functional, and lasts only for a few stropping sessions) but the wood quality is stunning and makes a perfect base for your own strop builds with thicker custom leather types. It'll take 4 weeks to receive the package in the mail but i doht need the CN strop urgently anyway. Most of my stropping i do is with wood paint stirring staffs, not with leather: micro-deburring on a super fine ceramic stone (not easy:mad: but can be done!), sometimes followed by a clean-up by one (compound loaded) paint stirring staff strop. And here, yes, i exchange the staffs regularly, i doht maintain them. Guess i am the lazy dude :D

I appreciate my sweet collection of leather wood strops but whenever i can i opt to use 1 paint stirring staff strop instead.
 
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NORTHWEST_KNIFE_GUY

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
534
I saw people NORTHWEST_KNIFE_GUY NORTHWEST_KNIFE_GUY :thumbsup: successfully "treating" their leather strop with sandpaper, mostly for resurfacing the smooth side of the leather. Sanding the leather on a flat backplate would also mean-flatten the leather/strop, nice idea! My inexpensive commercial CN strop, which i had been using for various tests/experiments/mounts, was just perfect for trying the sandpaper treatment, because my scrap leather on it wasn't mean flat, so i was looking forward to trying the whole thing out. If the sanding test failed, i could simply order a new CN strop.
Well, i failed:
img_20200522_102518vdj6q.jpg

I didn't get far. Didn't get to the sanding part. Here is what happened:
As mentioned, the surface wasn't mean flat. Moreover, the leather strop was loaded with compound, plenty of waxy SiC compound. I had to scrape off the compound first, before i could start the sanding, right? Otherwise the sanding/paper would have become a mess. But how do you scrape off gunk with a scraper (edge-following or edge-leading) if the surface isn't flat, plane? You doht, can't. Before i could scrape off the compound from the "valleys", i had to cut down the "peaks" from the "leatherscape";). Edge-leading scraping got me only so far, cutting flakes out of the leather surface. And the more/deeper i cut, the grainier the surface got. At this point i realized that i had just ruined the homogeneous smooth surface texture and a few scraper miscuts later the entire leather was fully ruined. 'To **ll:poop: with the scrap leather', 'i can glue on a new fresh piece of leather', i thought. So i tried to remove the leather from the wooden handle. That was a fail too. The Stanley cutter could cut off the leather but there's no way to get the glue off the wood face in an acceptable manner. Basically i am saying, if you use glue to mount a piece of leather on sideA of your double-sided wood strop and a year later you discard the leather, then you can't use sideA anymore for mounting a new piece of leather on it, because the hard-to-remove glue residue on the wood ruins the (re-usability of the) wood side. So for all my future leather wood strop builds i will be applying double-sided adhesive tape, e.g. carpet tape, instead of glue. Not that i exchange the leather regularly but there will be unfortunate mishaps when you do want to exchange the leather (or want to try a new leather type) without letting the wood/handle go to waste. Tape has some potential disadvantages but

I am trashing now the ruined wood strop, even though sideB is 100% flat/smooth/mint/usable. I got the product 3.5yrs ago time flies:confused:, it looks ugly by now, and it's time to let go or move on. I've ordered a new one, US$3.68 shipped lol from AX. It's not a great strop (the leather is too thin and imho not functional, and lasts only for a few stropping sessions) but the wood quality is stunning and makes a perfect base for your own strop builds with thicker custom leather types. It'll take 4 weeks to receive the package in the mail but i doht need the CN strop urgently anyway. Most of my stropping i do is with wood paint stirring staffs, not with leather: micro-deburring on a super fine ceramic stone (not easy:mad: but can be done!), sometimes followed by a clean-up by one (compound loaded) paint stirring staff strop. And here, yes, i exchange the staffs regularly, i doht maintain them. Guess i am the lazy dude :D

I appreciate my sweet collection of leather wood strops but whenever i can i opt to use 1 paint stirring staff strop instead.


You have access to any coarse sandpaper like 60, 80, 120 grit? That on a flat surface will remove the old leather / glue very quickly down to bare wood.
 
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